Stories about
Charlie Rangel


Charles Bernard Rangel (/ˈræŋɡəl/; born June 11, 1930) is an American politician who was a U.S. Representative for districts in New York from 1971 to 2017. A member of the Democratic Party, he was the second-longest serving incumbent member of the House of Representatives at the time of his retirement, serving continuously since 1971. As its most senior member, he was also the Dean of New York's congressional delegation. Rangel was the first African-American Chair of the influential House Ways and Means Committee. He is also a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Daily Ohio

Published  1 week ago

The House ethics committee today released three charges of ethical wrongdoing against Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters of California.The charges relate to whether Waters gave inappropriate assistance to a bank to which she had personal connections in getting federal bailout money.

The committee says Waters organized a meeting in 2008 between Treasury officials and executives from OneUnited Bank, where her husband was once a board member and had large investments. The bank received $12 million from the federal government’s Troubled Asset Relief Program.

The first charge against Waters states she violated a House rule that members must “behave at all times in a manner that shall reflect creditably on the House.” Waters should have instructed her chief of staff to stop assisting OneUnited once it became clear she should not be involved in helping the bank, but she failed to do so, the charges state.

Her staff’s “continued involvement in assisting OneUnited created an appearance that [Waters] was taking official action for [Waters’] personal benefit, which did not reflect creditably on the House,” the charges state.

Waters was also charged with violating the “spirit” of the House rule that prohibits a member from receiving compensation for exerting improper influence from her position in Congress. Waters’ husband’s investments in OneUnited constituted compensation, according to the charges.

The congresswoman was also charged with violating the Code of Ethics for Government Service.

Waters, who serves on the House Financial Services Committee, has defended her request for the meeting between Treasury officials and OneUnited executives as part of her efforts to advocate on behalf of minority-owned businesses. She maintains she is innocent of any wrongdoing and would rather face a public trial before the ethics committee this fall than admit to any of the charges against her.

House Democrat Charlie Rangel was also charged with multiple ethics violations this summer and will stand trial before the committee in the fall.

cbsnews

Published  2 weeks ago

The House ethics committee today released three charges of ethical wrongdoing against Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters of California.

The charges relate to whether Waters gave inappropriate assistance to a bank to which she had personal connections in getting federal bailout money.

The committee says Waters organized a meeting in 2008 between Treasury officials and executives from OneUnited Bank, where her husband was once a board member and had large investments. The bank received $12 million from the federal government's Troubled Asset Relief Program.

The first charge against Waters states she violated a House rule that members must "behave at all times in a manner that shall reflect creditably on the House." Waters should have instructed her chief of staff to stop assisting OneUnited once it became clear she should not be involved in helping the bank, but she failed to do so, the charges state.

Her staff's "continued involvement in assisting OneUnited created an appearance that [Waters] was taking official action for [Waters'] personal benefit, which did not reflect creditably on the House," the charges state.

Waters was also charged with violating the "spirit" of the House rule that prohibits a member from receiving compensation for exerting improper influence from her position in Congress. Waters' husband's investments in OneUnited constituted compensation, according to the charges.

The congresswoman was also charged with violating the Code of Ethics for Government Service.

Waters, who serves on the House Financial Services Committee, has defended her request for the meeting between Treasury officials and OneUnited executives as part of her efforts to advocate on behalf of minority-owned businesses. She maintains she is innocent of any wrongdoing and would rather face a public trial before the ethics committee this fall than admit to any of the charges against her.

House Democrat Charlie Rangel was also charged with multiple ethics violations this summer and will stand trial before the committee in the fall.

Fox News

Published  1 month ago

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, was removed from all of his committee assignments by House Republicans Monday evening following bipartisan condemnation of his recent remarks on white supremacy and white nationalism. King was serving on the committee on agriculture, the committee on small business and the committee on judiciary, according to his website.

"We will not tolerate this type of language in the Republican party ... or in the Democratic party as well," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told reporters. "I watched what Steve King said and we took action."

In a statement, King insisted that his comments had been "completely mischaracterized" and blasted McCarthy for what King called "a political decision that ignores the truth."

The announcement came just hours after Reps. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., and Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, introduced separate censure resolutions against King. Censure is one of three formal modes of punishment in the House. It is more severe than a reprimand, but not as severe as expulsion. The House has only censured 23 members in history, most recently, former Rep. Charlie Rangel, D-N.Y., in December 2010.

The removal of King from the roles comes just hours after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., slammed the representative for remarks he made about the terms “white nationalist” and “white supremacist." McConnell argued that if the representative “doesn't understand why 'white supremacy' is offensive, he should find another line of work.”

“There is no place in the Republican Party, the Congress or the country for an ideology of racial supremacy of any kind,” McConnell said. “I have no tolerance for such positions and those who espouse these views are not supporters of American ideals and freedoms. Rep. King's statements are unwelcome and unworthy of his elected position.”

King, 69, was already under fire from Republicans for aligning himself with a white nationalist politician and making a series of racially charged remarks when he made the head-turning comment in an interview published last week.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?” King asked The New York Times. “Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?”

In a statement after the article was published, King insisted that he rejected what he called the "evil ideology" of white nationalism and supremacy, and reiterated that he considers himself a "nationalist" who supports the values of "Western civilization."

GOP CAMPAIGN BOSS CONDEMNS REP. STEVE KING: 'MUST STAND UP AGAINST WHITE SUPREMACY'

But King has faced criticism over a series of racial remarks.

Last year, he tweeted “culture and demographics are our destiny” and said we “can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies.”

In 2013, he commented that while he has some sympathy for some illegal immigrants, "they aren't all valedictorians, they weren't all brought in by their parents -- for everyone who's a valedictorian, there's another 100 out there who weigh 130 pounds and they've got calves the size of cantaloupes because they're hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert."

"I think Steve King’s comments are his own and his exclusively and what he said was reprehensible and ought to lead to his resignation from Congress," Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, said following McConnell's statement. "Our Senate leader also said today that Steve King ought to find a different line of work. I think he’s absolutely right. I think it’s very clear that the party leadership is unified that Steve King is out of bounds and that he should no longer be serving in Congress.”

"As with any animal that is rabid, Steve King should be set aside and isolated," Rush said Monday in a statement that also called on Republicans to strip King of his committee memberships until he apologizes.

"It doesn't matter if you're a Democrat or Republican, we all have a responsibility to call out Rep. King's hateful and racist comments," Ryan said.

King's position in the GOP had been imperiled even before his remarks about white supremacy.

Shortly before the 2018 midterm elections, in which King was running, Rep. Steve Stivers, R-Ohio, then the head of the GOP campaign committee, issued an extraordinary public denunciation of him.

King has already drawn a primary challenger for the 2020 election: Randy Feenstra, a GOP state senator.

Fox News' Gregg Re and The Associated Press contributed to this report

MichelleMalkin.com

Published  1 month ago

Border Wall: Monument for the People, Not Pols

Creators Syndicate

Profligate politicians have never met a multibillion-dollar infrastructure project they didn’t like — except when it comes to President Donald Trump’s border wall.

Think about it.

Boston’s Big Dig black hole, the nation’s most expensive highway project, burned through $25 billion and was plagued by deadly engineering incompetence, endless cost overruns, leaks, lawsuits and debt.

California’s high-speed rail boondoggle is a $100 billion bullet train to nowhere. Gov. Jerry “Moonbeam” Brown promised a 2020 completion date for the miracle transportation system. The latest estimates predict it won’t open until at least 2033, and the costs keep rising.

Seattle’s ill-fated Alaskan Way Viaduct replacement topped out at $4 billion in local, state and federal funds for a two-mile bored road tunnel that will finally open next month — nearly four years behind schedule and hundreds of millions of dollars over budget.

What the Big Dig, bullet train boondoggle and Seattle squander all have in common is that political elites, lobbyists and corporate heavy-hitters trampled over grassroots citizen opposition to get their way. Too many government construction projects are built because these publicly subsidized gravy trains reward campaign donors, powerful public employee unions and assorted control freaks in the urban planning and transportation sectors.

Another glaring example? Across the country, voters have repeatedly rejected billion-dollar sports stadium and arena subsidies over the past 30 years — only to be sabotaged by bipartisan alliances overruling the will of the people. I used to run a watchdog website called “Porkwatch” filled with so many field-of-schemes case studies that I couldn’t keep track of them anymore.

Then there are all the tax-funded highways, bridges, museums and other edifices glorifying Beltway swamp creatures. The infamous Democratic Sen. Robert Byrd of West Virginia steered billions of federal dollars back to his home state, where more than 50 government buildings bear his or his wife’s name — not to mention an eponymous telescope, multiple libraries and “lifelong learning centers,” wellness centers, industrial parks, community centers, gardens, interchanges, highways, expressways, bridges, locks and a dam. A bas-relief sculpture of the alpha porker greets visitors at the Byrd dam, deemed unnecessary by locals.

Not to be outdone, GOP Sen. Mitch McConnell has his own park; former Democratic Sen. John Dingell has his own transit center; the late Democratic Sen. Frank Lautenberg has his own rail station; tax cheat Democratic Rep. Charlie Rangel has his own tax-funded “Charles B. Rangel Center for Public Service” at the City College of New York; and the recently retired powerbroker Democratic Sen. Harry Reid sponsored billions of dollars in egotistical earmarks, including several million for a “research and technology park” named after him.

Was there a swell of grassroots support for all these vanity projects? Was there overwhelming demand for the 10,000th long and windy road named after some blowhard incumbent hack?

Wouldn’t it be refreshing, for once, for the federal government to prioritize infrastructure that serves the national interest over special interests? And how about dedicating and consecrating this project in the memory of the thousands of Americans and law-abiding immigrants who have sacrificed their lives for our security? We’ve already got Adopt-a-Highway sponsors. Why not an Adopt-a-Wall program?

Open borders academics and media propagandists keep lecturing that Americans don’t want a wall. Yet, more than 325,000 citizens have raised $19.5 million in 22 days to fund the border that the Beltway obstinately refuses to fund.

President Trump’s defining battle against the Beltway to fortify our borders — by concrete, steel, increased manpower, electronic surveillance, all of it — isn’t just about fulfilling a campaign promise. The wall is a necessary monument to sovereignty in a nation clogged with billions of dollars of worthless political monuments to Me, Me, Me.

GOP

Published  1 month ago

House Democrats’ choices for committee leadership may be even more questionable than their ethics and politics

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