Stories about
Matthew Whitaker


Matthew G. Whitaker (born October 29, 1969, in Ankeny, Iowa) is an American lawyer and the acting United States Attorney General. He was appointed as such by President Donald Trump on November 7, 2018, after the forced resignation of Jeff Sessions, for whom he served as Chief of Staff.

I Love My Freedom

Published  1 month ago

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been slapped with a third ethics complaint in the past week.

The first complaint involves allegations that she illegally funneled money to her boyfriend, Riley Roberts, who is apparently working for her campaign.

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The second complaint alleges Ocasio-Cortez and her chief of staff, Saikat Chakrabarti, may have intentionally concealed information about their control over a far-left Super PAC.

Now, a third ethics complaint accuses Ocasio-Cortez of using government resources for campaign purposes.

It appears that Ocasio-Cortez’s U.S. House of Representatives Instagram account is linked to her official campaign account, which features a video of her on the House floor and a place for supporters to donate money to her re-election fund.

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As detailed by The Daily Caller, that is not permitted:

A Washington, D.C.-based ethics group is claiming that New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s social media usage violates House ethics rules against using taxpayer resources for political purposes.

Ocasio-Cortez’s political Instagram account contains direct links to her House Instagram account and includes a link for political contributions, alongside posts of official video footage on the House floor, according to a complaint Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust (FACT) plans to file Thursday with the Office of Congressional Ethics. The group claims these actions violate House ethics rules.

“In a way, it’s a straight forward complaint,” Kendra Arnold, executive director of FACT, told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “Broadly speaking, the rules clearly define that politics and government works cannot overlap. There are reasons for that: mostly because we don’t want our taxpayer dollars going toward campaigns.” FACT is a nonprofit group whose past president was Matthew Whitaker, an attorney who served as President Donald Trump’s acting attorney general in 2018 and 2019.

House ethics rules forbid lawmakers from using resources like House video for political purposes, the complaint notes. House ethics rules prohibit a member from posting a link to her official social media site on a campaign social media site. She solicited donations on the page that used official House video footage, according to FACT. This is not the first ethical complaint Ocasio-Cortez has had this week.

In one week, the face of the Democratic Party was hit with three ethics complaints, and that’s not all.

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On Monday, it was also reported that Chakrabarti allegedly funneled over $1 million in political contributions to his private business.

Just consider that for a second.

Ocasio-Cortez and her chief of staff “could be facing jail time” if their control over a far-left PAC was intentionally hidden.

It was revealed that Chakrabarti, while working with Ocasio-Cortez, allegedly funneled over $1 million in political contributions to his private business.

And now, Ocasio-Cortez has been slapped with three ethics complaints over allegations that she violated congressional rules, some of which may have been illegal.

That’s the exact definition of the corruption in Washington that many Americans want drained from the swamp.

American Oversight

Published  1 month ago

American Oversight has uncovered the signed directive from former Attorney General Jeff Sessions instructing a federal prosecutor to carry out President Trump’s authoritarian demand to investigate Hillary Clinton.

The document, obtained through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) litigation by American Oversight, is a formal, November 2017 letter from Sessions to U.S. Attorney for Utah John Huber and has never before been released to the public. In a sworn declaration filed in November 2018 in response to American Oversight’s lawsuit, the Justice Department had insisted that no written directive existed and that all guidance to Huber had been delivered verbally.

Trump has repeatedly tweeted demands for DOJ to investigate Clinton. Throughout the 2016 presidential general election campaign and at multiple rallies after taking office, Trump and his supporters have used the rallying cry “Lock her up” to call for the prosecution of Clinton.

“’Lock her up’ was wrong at campaign rallies, and it’s even worse coming from the Department of Justice,” said Austin Evers, American Oversight executive director. “Even after this long, it’s still deeply shocking to see the black-and-white proof that Jeff Sessions caved to President Trump’s worst authoritarian impulses and ordered a wide-ranging investigation of his political opponents based on demands from Congress instead of the facts and the law.”

On November 13, 2017, Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd wrote to former House Judiciary Committee Chair Robert Goodlatte informing him that Sessions had directed “senior federal prosecutors” to evaluate issues the congressman had raised in previous letters. Goodlatte had written to Sessions calling for the appointment of a second special counsel to investigate Clinton, the Uranium One sale, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s handling of the inquiry into Clinton’s use of a private email server.

But until now, the full scope of Huber’s mandate had not been disclosed. The new documents obtained by American Oversight show that on November 22, 2017, Sessions wrote to Huber and directed him to review the matters referenced in Boyd’s letter, and to make recommendations about whether to open new investigations or potentially even appoint a second special counsel.

The documents also show that former Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, who was then serving as Sessions’ chief of staff, personally sent the letter to Huber as an attachment to an email that read simply, “As we discussed. MW.”

DOJ Claimed No Written Directives Existed

After Boyd’s letter to Goodlatte became public in November 2017, American Oversight submitted FOIA requests with DOJ, seeking the release of any directives or guidance given to the “federal prosecutors” mentioned in the letter. Three months later, after DOJ failed to provide the requested records, American Oversight sued.

In November 2018, DOJ filed a motion for summary judgment in the ongoing litigation, asserting that no records of any written directives existed. In support of that motion, DOJ submitted a sworn declaration claiming that officials with direct knowledge of the situation — including both Huber and Whitaker — had stated there were no written directives and that all instructions to Huber had been delivered orally in meetings or small discussions.

On February 28, 2019 — two days before Whitaker was scheduled to leave DOJ — the department reversed course and informed the court that it had located a record responsive to American Oversight’s request for written directives.

The letter from Sessions, and the email from Whitaker to Huber transmitting it, directly contradict DOJ’s prior sworn declaration, including information Whitaker had provided in response to the declarant’s inquiries.

“It strains credulity to believe that the Justice Department didn’t know about this letter when they swore under penalty of perjury that it didn’t exist — you don’t exactly forget about a formal directive to investigate Hillary Clinton signed by Jeff Sessions,” said Evers. “The fact that they only ‘found’ it the same week Matthew Whitaker was heading for the exit makes it hard to see DOJ’s previous denial as anything but a deliberate attempt to conceal the extent to which President Trump’s authoritarian demands were being put into action.”

American Oversight is continuing to seek answers about DOJ’s actions in support of Trump’s unprecedented demands to investigate his perceived political rivals. The case remains in active litigation and we are considering our options to bring the DOJ’s misstatements to the court’s attention and to uncover how they were made in the first place. We’ve also sent multiple follow-up FOIAs to DOJ seeking records about Huber’s investigation.

View the Sessions directive to Huber obtained by American Oversight below:

DocumentCloud

Published  1 month ago

Obtained via FOIA litigation by American Oversight. November 22, 2017 email sent by former Justice Department Chief of Staff Matthew Whitaker to U.S. Attorney John Huber, attaching a November 22,...

David Harris Jr

Published  1 month ago

I don’t know if all socialists are ethically challenged, but AOC certainly is. She has been hit with her 3rd ethics complaint in the past week. Number one is the $6k transferred to her boyfriend. The second was where she and her chief of staff hid over a million dollars from her campaign and now, she has been hit up over using government resources for campaign purposes. It seems that her House Instagram account was linked to her campaign account, which has video of her on the House floor and a place where you can donate money to her reelection fund.

A Washington, D.C.-based ethics group is claiming that New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s social media usage violates House ethics rules against using taxpayer resources for political purposes.

Ocasio-Cortez’s political Instagram account contains direct links to her House Instagram account and includes a link for political contributions, alongside posts of official video footage on the House floor, according to a complaint Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust (FACT) plans to file Thursday with the Office of Congressional Ethics. The group claims these actions violate House ethics rules.

“In a way, it’s a straight forward complaint,” Kendra Arnold, executive director of FACT, told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “Broadly speaking, the rules clearly define that politics and government works cannot overlap. There are reasons for that: mostly because we don’t want our taxpayer dollars going toward campaigns.” FACT is a nonprofit group whose past president was Matthew Whitaker, an attorney who served as President Donald Trump’s acting attorney general in 2018 and 2019.

My book is here! And I personally handed a copy to our President at the White House!!! I hope you enjoy it @realDonaldTrump!

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Fox News

Published  1 month ago

House Democrats opened a huge new avenue Monday in their investigations into President Trump, as the chairman of the Judiciary Committee began firing off document requests to dozens of figures from the president's administration, family and business.

The White House confirmed Monday it had received a letter from Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., pertaining to his pursuit of documents related to potential obstruction of justice and corruption.

“The House Judiciary Committee’s letter has been received by the White House,” Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said in a Monday statement. “The Counsel’s Office and relevant White House officials will review it and respond at the appropriate time.”

NADLER ANNOUNCES SWEEPING DOCUMENT REQUESTS, SAYS TRUMP OBSTRUCTED JUSTICE

The White House did not detail the specific requests, but they come on the heels of former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen's dramatic House testimony last week in which raised questions about the president's personal finances, his charity and more even as he testified he had no evidence of collusion with Russia.

Nadler, who would oversee any impeachment proceedings against Trump, on Sunday first announced the document requests and said the goal of the probe was "to present the case to the American people about obstruction of justice, corruption and abuse of power" within the Trump administration.

Appearing on ABC’s “This Week,” Nadler said they were “issuing document requests to over 60 different people and individuals from the White House to the Department of Justice, Donald Trump, Jr., [Trump Organization CFO] Allen Weisselberg.”

Congressional Democrats have repeatedly promised to exercise tight oversight of the Trump administration since securing a majority in the House of Representatives in last November's midterms. But Nadler's comments signaled that Democratic leaders are not counting on Special Counsel Robert Mueller's forthcoming report on possible Russia collusion to mark the end of such investigations.

Nadler, in recent weeks, hired two veteran lawyers and Trump critics as the committee gears up to investigate the department and review Mueller's final conclusions. The lawyers, Barry Berke and Norman Eisen, have been retained on a consulting basis.

Nadler's committee has also called in the former acting attorney general, Matthew Whitaker, and plans to question him again in the coming weeks. Whitaker is a close Trump ally who had criticized the Mueller report before he was appointed. William Barr has since been confirmed as attorney general.

The Judiciary Committee isn't the only House panel planning to look into Trump aggressively. Massachusetts Democratic Rep. Richard Neal, the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, is expected to eventually try to obtain Trump's tax returns, which the president has refused to release. But for now, Neal is taking it slow.

Without naming Nadler, Trump tweeted Sunday that he was being "persecuted by some very bad, conflicted & corrupt people in a Witch Hunt that is illegal & should never have been allowed to start - And only because I won the Election!"

Meanwhile, Axios reported Monday that House Democratic leaders are hoping to use a series of hearings to effectively put Trump on trial.

Leaders are planning to roll out a “slow-bleed strategy with lengthy public hearings and scores of witnesses to methodically pick apart Trump's finances and presidency,” the outlet reported. A House leadership source told Axios the push is designed to avoid giving Trump a boost in 2020 by going the impeachment route, though it's unclear whether rank-and-file members eying impeachment would be satisfied with mere hearings.

“Many in leadership believe impeachment could help Trump get re-elected,” the leadership source said.

Fox News’ Jenny Buchholz and Liam Quinn and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Washington Examiner

Published  1 month ago

Attorney General William Barr will not recuse himself from special counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing Russia investigation.

"Following General Barr's confirmation, senior career ethics officials advised that General Barr should not recuse himself from the Special Counsel's investigation,” Justice Department spokesperson Kerri Kupec said in a statement to the Washington Examiner. “Consistent with that advice, General Barr has decided not to recuse.”

Barr, who was confirmed last month, attracted scrutiny from Democrats due to a 19-page memo he wrote last June that outlined why he thought President Trump didn’t obstruct justice when he ousted former FBI Director James Comey in 2017. The memo argued it was "fatally misconceived" to probe obstruction of justice charges against Trump and said “Mueller should not be permitted to demand that the President submit to interrogation about alleged obstruction.”

Meanwhile, some conservatives expressed concern over Barr’s relationship with Mueller. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said he was caught off guard when he was informed Mueller was a guest at Barr’s daughters’ weddings and that their wives are involved in the same Bible study.

Barr did not commit to recusing himself from the Russia investigation in light of the backlash and instead said he would confer with ethics officials.

Mueller is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Kremlin. He is also looking at whether Trump obstructed justice by firing Comey. Trump has repeatedly denounced the investigation and called it a “witch hunt.”

Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the investigation due to meetings with Russia’s ambassador, paving the way for Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to oversee the investigation as its acting attorney general. Rosenstein then appointed Mueller to lead the investigation.

After Sessions’ departure, former acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker refrained from recusing himself, even though the Justice Department told Congress that ethics advisers believed he "should recuse himself ... because it was their view that a reasonable person with knowledge of the relevant facts likely would question [his] impartiality." Whitaker had previously been critical of Mueller.

Fox News

Published  1 month ago

House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerry Nadler, who would oversee any impeachment proceedings against President Trump, announced that he will more than 60 document requests to the White House and Justice Department on Monday -- a barrage that Nadler called the opening salvo in wide-ranging investigation.

True Pundit

Published  1 month ago

Potentially troubling news in the quest to drain the Swamp.

Former acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker has left the Department of Justice.

A Justice Department spokesman told The Hill that Whitaker’s last day was Saturday but did not expand on the circumstances surrounding his departure or his plans after leaving. It is unclear where Whitaker might go, including whether he might seek another role in the Trump administration.

Whitaker served as the chief of staff for former attorney general Jeff Sessions until last November, when President Trump tapped him to lead the department temporarily following Sessions’ ouster. Sessions resigned at Trump’s request the day after the November midterm elections, after enduring months of criticism from the president over his decision to recuse himself from special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.

Whitaker’s departure comes less than three weeks after Bill Barr was confirmed as Trump’s next attorney general. Barr was widely expected to bring new blood to top leadership roles in the department, raising questions about Whitaker’s tenure.

Whitaker, a former U.S. attorney in Iowa, quickly emerged as a controversial figure as a result of his past criticisms of Mueller’s investigation, which he began overseeing when he took the reins at the Justice Department. Democrats and other Trump critics feared that Whitaker would take steps to impede Mueller’s probe.

Whitaker endured a contentious appearance before the House Judiciary Committee last month, during which he was grilled on the Mueller investigation and his communications with Trump. READ MORE:

TheHill

Published  1 month ago

Former acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker has left the Department of Justice.

A Justice Department spokesman told The Hill that Whitaker’s last day was Saturday but did not expand on the circumstances surrounding his departure or his plans after leaving. It is unclear where Whitaker plans to go, including whether he might seek another role in the Trump administration.

Whitaker served as the chief of staff for former attorney general Jeff Sessions until last November, when President Trump tapped him to lead the department temporarily following Sessions’ ouster. Sessions resigned at Trump’s request the day after the November midterm elections, after enduring months of criticism from the president over his decision to recuse himself from special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.

Whitaker’s departure comes just weeks after Bill Barr was confirmed as Trump’s pick to serve as attorney general. Barr was widely expected new blood to top leadership roles in the department, raising questions about Whitaker’s tenure.

Whitaker, a former U.S. attorney in Iowa, quickly emerged as a controversial figure as a result of his past criticisms of Mueller’s investigation, which he began overseeing when he took the reins at the Justice Department. Democrats and other Trump critics feared that Whitaker would take steps to impede Mueller’s probe in his role.

Whitaker endured a contentious appearance before the House Judiciary Committee last month during which he was grilled on the Mueller investigation and his communications with Trump. Whitaker insisted he did not interfere with the investigation and that Trump did not ask him to make commitments or promises with respect to Mueller’s probe or other investigations. But he angered Democrats by refusing to directly answer several inquiries during the public testimony.

House Judiciary Chairman Jerold Nadler (D-N.Y.) said last week that Whitaker would return to clarify his testimony before the committee voluntarily, after alleging that his answers were “unsatisfactory, incomplete or contradicted by other evidence.”

Since Whitaker’s testimony, the New York Times reported that Trump at one point asked Whitaker whether the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York Geoffrey Berman could be put in charge of an investigation there related to campaign finance violations stemming from a scheme to pay off women who alleged affairs with Trump before the 2016 election. Trump has denied doing so and the Justice Department said Whitaker stood by his testimony before the Judiciary Committee.

Lydia Wheeler contributed.

NBC News

Published  1 month ago

WASHINGTON — Former acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker left his position at the Justice Department on Saturday, a department spokeswoman said.

Whitaker had been serving as a senior counselor at the Justice Department since Attorney General William Barr was sworn in last month.

His next career move is unknown, but Whitaker has told friends that he will remain in Washington because there are "many opportunities here," according to sources who have spoken with him in recent days.

Whitaker previously served as former Attorney General Jeff Session’s chief of staff. He was accused by some within the Justice Department of being more loyal to the White House than to Sessions as President Donald Trump grew frustrated with his attorney general.

Trump publicly criticized Sessions for recusing himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, a move that allowed Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to appoint special counsel Robert Mueller to lead the probe. Sessions was eventually forced to resign after the November midterms.

When Whitaker took over Sessions’ position last November, Democrats expressed concerns that he would hamper the Mueller probe. Whitaker, who had previously questioned the scope of the special counsel investigation, ultimately decided not to recuse himself from the probe.

Barr now holds oversight power in the Mueller probe and with that, has the job to decide what portions of the probe, which is reportedly in its final stages, to share with Congress.

Talking Points Memo

Published  1 month ago

Sun Sentinel/Tribune News Service

A D.C. federal judge rejected a motion Wednesday from GOP operative Roger Stone claiming that special counsel Robert Mueller’s team tipped off CNN before his Jan. 25 morning arrest.

Stone had petitioned Judge Amy Berman Jackson to hold a hearing demanding that prosecutors “show cause” for why they were not in contempt of court for allegedly leaking a copy of the indictment to the press. A CNN news crew captured Stone’s arrest on video, after having a team stake out the spin artist’s Florida home.

But exhibits Stone provided “supplied no reason to believe that any contempt of court had occurred,” Berman Jackson wrote in the order, adding that evidence and filings he introduced into the record “demonstrate that there is no basis” to issue a contempt order.

Berman Jackson addressed the allegations around CNN directly in the filing, as well. The theory has taken root in conservative media over the past month, with former hot tub salesman and onetime acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker giving some credence to it in Feb. 8 testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

“Defendant’s recitation of the events reflects nothing more than the fact that the reporter had the indictment in hand after the defendant was arrested, and there is no evidence that the reporter had it earlier,” the judge wrote.

Stone faces charges of obstruction, witness tampering, and lying to Congress. Berman Jackson strengthened a gag order on Stone last week after he posted a picture of her on Instagram with what appeared to be crosshairs next to her head.

In Wednesday’s order, Berman Jackson also noted that Stone’s argument had shifted from the initial allegation that prosecutors leaked a copy of the indictment to CNN.

As the dispute wound on, Stone’s attorneys began to argue instead that special counsel prosecutors released the indictment before an unsealing order came down in the case.

“The defendant misapprehends the clear purpose and the intent of the sealing order,” she wrote. “The OSC’s publication of the indictment after the defendant’s arrest was not unauthorized.”

Rantt

Published  1 month ago

After Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation ends, President Donald Trump’s legal troubles are just beginning.

1. President Trump is preparing for a perilous legal road ahead: The Daily Beast reported that President Trump is well aware of the fact that after Special Counsel Robert Mueller ends his investigation and submits his report, the battle is just beginning. Trump reportedly told his lawyers late last year that he would like them to stay on even after Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference and Trump’s potential obstruction of justice ends. President Trump’s most immediate concern was reportedly the Southern District of New York’s (SDNY) investigations. This makes sense given the fact President Trump has taken a great interest in who would lead the SDNY in the earliest days of his administration. Trump reportedly also asked then-Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker to re-install a Trump ally to lead the office. The Wall Street Journal just reported tonight that the House Judiciary Committee believes they have evidence indicating that was indeed the case.

The SDNY led the investigation which uncovered Michael Cohen’s hush money payments on behalf of Trump that garnered a prison sentence for Cohen and an unindicted co-conspirator status for Trump. The SDNY is also probing the Trump Inaugural Committee to determine whether or not Russian oligarchs or other foreign entities illegally funneled money into the committee. There is also the emoluments probe investigating Trump International Hotel. And last, but certainly not least, the Democratically-controlled House Committees are going to use Mueller’s report as a roadmap for their investigations and run their own in a manner that will not be restricted by the Justice Department. The House plans on leaving no stone unturned, diving into Trump’s lifetime of corruption. What the result will be is unknown, but what we do know is they have plenty of material to work with already if their plan is to draft Articles of Impeachment in the House Judiciary Committee.

This is only a partial version of our Rantt Rundown newsletter covering Day 767 of Trump’s presidency. To get the full newsletter breaking down the top 5 stories of the day in your inbox every weeknight, please subscribe below.

Rantt Media’s comprehensive articles source reporting from top news organizations, but they’re also built on brilliant analysis from our team. We are independently-owned and strive for quality, not clicks. But the only way to truly have a media for the people is for media to be funded by the people. We take pride in being reader-funded so that we are beholden to you, not corporate interests. If you like the work we do, please consider supporting us by signing up for a monthly subscription.

Rundown // Donald Trump / Obstruction Of Justice / Robert Mueller / Russia Investigation

WSJ

Published  1 month ago

A House panel believes it has evidence that President Trump asked Matthew Whitaker, at the time the acting attorney general, whether Manhattan U.S. attorney Geoffrey Berman could regain control of his office’s investigation into Mr. Trump’s former lawyer and his real-estate business.

Rantt

Published  1 month ago

President Trump’s authoritarian tendencies become the bedrock of his presidency.

I Love My Freedom

Published  1 month ago

"We'll subpoena you! No, we'll SUE you!" Is that the juvenile voice of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez? Nope, as odd as it may sound, this is actually coming from California Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff. Get Your FREE 'Build

POLITICUSUSA

Published  1 month ago

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) is not a person to trifle with. He has already taken steps to hold Donald Trump and his administration accountable since taking charge of his committee on January 3. And there is no reason to think that in the coming months he will let up and go easy on the president or any of his appointees.

In a radio interview on Sunday, Nadler made very clear where he stands on the current occupant of the White House when he called Trump the “greatest threat” to U.S. democracy since “the Civil War.”

Speaking with radio host John Catsimatidis on AM 970 in New York Nadler said:

“I view this president and his conduct as the greatest threat to the democratic system and to the constitutional government since the Civil War.”

“Whether it’s threatening the newspapers or threatening the judiciary or calling people who criticize him treasonous.”

Nadler is one of the key Democratic committee chairmen who will soon begin to investigate many different aspects of the Trump administration.

This morning he said that the his committee will soon be holding hearings into “abuse of power” and “obstruction of justice.”

“Clearly…there have been major abuses of power, major obstruction of justice, obvious violations of the emoluments clause of the Constitution,” Nadler said. “All of these have to be looked at.”

He also make clear that his hearings would look at all actions, including those conducted in a “noncriminal manner,” to determine of governmental norms have been violated. He said he will investigate whether Trump administration policies have threatened the U.S. democratic system.

Nadler also said that Democrats in the House will introduce legislation which requires that special counsel Robert Mueller’s final report be made public.

As chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Nadler will be in charge of an impeachment investigation if Democrats pursue that course of action.

In public comments last week Nadler stated that if Attorney General William Barr tries to stop Congress from using Mueller’s work for its own probes, he will have a major fight on his hands. He also said that he will not hesitate to subpoena the Mueller report if necessary.

Nadler also plans to continue to investigate former acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker for possible perjury committed during his sworn testimony before Nadler’s committee. During his testimony Whitaker was nonresponsive, rude and evasive in all of the questions posed to him by Nadler.

www.theepochtimes.com

Published  2 months ago

Americans need to turn off their TVs and look into President Donald Trump on their own, said Andrew Pollack, father of Meadow Pollack who was slain in the Parkland shooting

www.theepochtimes.com

Published  2 months ago

Commentary Former Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker is owed an apology by an awful lot of people in ...

Mediaite

Published  2 months ago

Fox News’ Judge Andrew Napolitano said today if the latest New York Times report on President Donald Trump‘s call with former Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker is true, it’s evidence of “corrupt intent” and “clearly an attempt to obstruct justice” from the president.

To recap: the Times reported that Trump spoke to Whitaker a few months ago about whether US Attorney Geoffrey Berman could oversee the SDNY Michael Cohen investigation despite his recusal. The report notes Whitaker “knew he could not put Mr. Berman in charge” and Trump ultimately “soured” on him in the end.

Napolitano noted to Shepard Smith that Whitaker could be in some trouble if this report his true, given his recent congressional testimony.

But, he continued, it’s really bad news for Trump:

SMITH: This phone call––if the Times reporting is accurate… the phone call would be evidence of what?

NAPOLITANO: Corrupt intent. That is an effort to use the levers of power of the government for a corrupt purpose, to deflect an investigation into himself or his allies.

When Smith brought up the question of obstruction, Napolitano it would only be actual obstruction if it succeeded, “but if you try to interfere with a criminal prosecution that may knock at your own door by putting your ally in there, that is clearly an attempt to obstruct justice.”

He also expressed some amazement at the part of the report concerning Trump “using his allies in the Congress to interfere with an ongoing criminal investigation.”

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“This breaks new ground,” he said.

You can watch above, via Fox News.

[image via screengrab]

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Breitbart

Published  2 months ago

The Justice Department could announce the completion of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on his investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential election as early as next week, according to report Wednesday.

CNN reports that newly-confirmed attorney general Willian Barr is expected to turn over a summary of the report to Congress soon after its completion. The outlet cautioned that President Donald Trump’s overseas trip to meet with North Korea dictator Kim Jong-un could impact the “precise timing of the announcement.”

Preparations undertaken by Barr and Justice Department officials is the clearest sign yet that the nearly two-year-old investigation is drawing to a close. CNN writes: “The scope and contours of what Barr will send to Congress remain unclear. Also unclear is how long it will take Justice officials to prepare what will be submitted to lawmakers.”

Barr has cited Justice Department regulations that say Mueller’s report should be confidential. They require only that the report explain decisions to pursue or decline prosecutions.

The Justice Department, nor the special counsel’s office would comment to CNN regarding its report.

In a press conference last month, then-Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said he believed Mueller’s investigation was “close to being completed.”

“Right now the investigation is I think close to being completed,” the Justice Department official told reporters. “I hope we can get the report from Director Mueller as soon as possible.”

Appearing on CNN’s New Day Wednesday morning, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said that Mueller’s report could be “anti-climactic.”

“I think the hope is that the Mueller investigation will clear the air on this issue once and for all. I’m really not sure it will, and the investigation, when completed, could turn out to be quite anti-climactic and not draw a conclusion about that,” he said.

Mueller, a former FBI director, was named by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in May 2017 to look into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Mueller’s team has indicted a total of 34 people — yet thus far, no charges of outright collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow have been filed. Last month, Roger Stone, a veteran Republican operative and longtime Trump adviser, was arrested at his south Florida home by FBI agents on charges of making false statements to Congress and witness tampering. Six Trump associates have pleaded guilty to various charges so far including his former campaign manager Paul Manafort, former lawyer Michael Cohen and former national security advisor Michael Flynn.

House Democrats are stepping up their efforts to investigate President Trump and his associates, hiring new lawyers and staff as they take on oversight responsibility and prepare for a showdown over access to Mueller’s report. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY) confirmed last week that he hired two veteran lawyers and Trump critics — Barry Berke and Norman Eisen — as his panel gears up to investigate the Justice Department and review Mueller’s final conclusions. Nadler and other Democrats have pressured Barr to release as much of the report as possible.

Meanwhile, it appears Senate investigators may be winding down their own probe without finding evidence of collusion. NBC News, citing Democrats and Republicans, reported last week that the panel has yet to uncover “direct evidence” of “conspiracy” between Trump officials and Russia. “If we write a report based upon the facts that we have, then we don’t have anything that would suggest there was collusion by the Trump campaign and Russia,” Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr (R-NC) told CBS News.

The Agence France-Presse and Associated Press contributed to this report.

Dan Bongino

Published  2 months ago

Discredited third-rate conspiracy theorist, Congressman Adam Schiff (CA) indicated that wouldn’t accept the findings of the Special Counsel’s investigation into the Trump campaign and Russia if it concludes there was no evidence of collusion between the two.

Breitbart reports that on yesterday’s CNN show, State of the Union, host Dana Bash asked Schiff, “We expect at some point maybe soon, maybe not, the findings of the Mueller investigation to finally be completed. If he finds that there was no direct collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, will you accept that?”

Schiff responded, “We’re going to have to do our own investigation, and we are. We’ll certainly be very interested to learn what Bob Mueller finds. We may have to fight to get that information. Bill Barr has not been willing to commit to provide that report either to the Congress or to the American people. We’re going to need to see it. The American people need to see it. We may also need to see the evidence behind that report. There may be, for example, evidence of collusion or conspiracy that is clear and convincing but not proof beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff says Congress “may also need to see the evidence behind” the Mueller report, saying there could be “clear and convincing” evidence of collusion, but not “proof beyond a reasonable doubt” that would prompt Mueller to bring charges. #CNNSOTU pic.twitter.com/ftm1zQRJNj

When Bash noted that Mueller conducted an “extensive investigation” and asked whether or not Schiff would accept the findings “separate” from the investigation the Congressman is doing, he replied. “You know, I will certainly accept them in this way, Dana; I have great confidence in the special counsel. And if the special counsel represents that he has investigated and not been interfered with and not been able to make a criminal case, then I will believe that he is operating in good faith.”

Mueller’s investigation is rumored to be wrapping up. Last month, Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker told reporters, “The investigation is, I think, close to being completed and I hope that we can get the report from Mueller as soon as possible.”

Dan Bongino

Published  2 months ago

Discredited third-rate conspiracy theorist, Congressman Adam Schiff (CA) indicated that wouldn’t accept the findings of the Special Counsel’s investigation into the Trump campaign and Russia if it concludes there was no evidence of collusion between the two.

Breitbart reports that on yesterday’s CNN show, State of the Union, host Dana Bash asked Schiff, “We expect at some point maybe soon, maybe not, the findings of the Mueller investigation to finally be completed. If he finds that there was no direct collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, will you accept that?”

Schiff responded, “We’re going to have to do our own investigation, and we are. We’ll certainly be very interested to learn what Bob Mueller finds. We may have to fight to get that information. Bill Barr has not been willing to commit to provide that report either to the Congress or to the American people. We’re going to need to see it. The American people need to see it. We may also need to see the evidence behind that report. There may be, for example, evidence of collusion or conspiracy that is clear and convincing but not proof beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff says Congress “may also need to see the evidence behind” the Mueller report, saying there could be “clear and convincing” evidence of collusion, but not “proof beyond a reasonable doubt” that would prompt Mueller to bring charges. #CNNSOTU pic.twitter.com/ftm1zQRJNj

When Bash noted that Mueller conducted an “extensive investigation” and asked whether or not Schiff would accept the findings “separate” from the investigation the Congressman is doing, he replied. “You know, I will certainly accept them in this way, Dana; I have great confidence in the special counsel. And if the special counsel represents that he has investigated and not been interfered with and not been able to make a criminal case, then I will believe that he is operating in good faith.”

Mueller’s investigation is rumored to be wrapping up. Last month, Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker told reporters, “The investigation is, I think, close to being completed and I hope that we can get the report from Mueller as soon as possible.”

Jihad Watch

Published  2 months ago

Merkel’s Germany has a new and massive Muslim population; Merkel is clearly much more interested in keeping that population happy than in honoring Germany’s alliance with the United States.

“Germany: No Choice But to Reject Terrorist Extradition to US,” Associated Press, February 7, 2019:

BERLIN — An American request for the extradition of a Turkish man wanted in the United States on terrorism charges was rejected because there was no other option under German law, authorities said Thursday, in a case that has raised the ire of officials in Washington.

Adem Yilmaz, who was indicted under seal in the U.S. in 2015 on charges of participating nearly 10 years earlier in attacks on U.S. military forces along the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan, was convicted of membership in a terrorist organization in Germany in 2010.

To extradite him to face trial in the U.S. on terrorism charges would constitute double jeopardy under German law, Frankfurt state court spokeswoman Gundula Fehns-Boeer told The Associated Press.

“An extradition could have only occurred if the Americans said they would restrict the charges to crimes not already punished,” she said.

After the Frankfurt court’s decision on the American request last week, Hesse state officials on Tuesday deported Yilmaz to his native Turkey, said state Interior Ministry spokesman Marcus Gerngross.

Gerngross said there was “nothing unusual” about deporting a foreign national who had violated German laws, but the decision angered American officials.

American officials filed additional assurances on Monday, attempting to address the Frankfurt court’s decision, but the deportation was carried out before those arguments could be considered.

After learning of the deportation, Deputy U.S. Secretary of State John Sullivan called a meeting with German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, who was in Washington to take part in meetings of the coalition fighting against the Islamic State group, to express American displeasure.

“We are gravely disappointed by Germany’s decision to deport a dangerous terrorist — Adem Yilmaz — to Turkey, rather than to extradite him to the United States to face justice for his complicity in the murder of two American servicemen,” acting U.S. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said in a statement later Wednesday after the two diplomats had met.

I Love My Freedom

Published  2 months ago

On Friday afternoon, President Trump announced he was officially declaring a national emergency at the southern border in order to protect the American people.

The Democrat-Led House Judiciary Committee immediately opened an investigation into the emergency’s legitimacy.

Get Your “Build The Wall” Coin For 50% Off And We’ll Send Nancy Pelosi A Foam Brick!

From Washington Examiner:

The House Judiciary Committee will investigate President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency at the border, citing his statement Friday, “I didn’t need to do this, but I would rather do it much faster.”

Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and fellow Democrats have requested a hearing with Department of Justice officials and White House counsel, writing in a letter to the president, “We believe your declaration of an emergency shows a reckless disregard for the separation of powers and your own responsibilities under our constitutional system.”

“The House Judiciary Committee is commencing an immediate investigation into this matter, which raises both serious constitutional and statutory issues,” the letter signed by Nadler and six other House Democrats said.

The ACLU is now set to challenge Trump’s decision, also.

VOTER POLL: Do You Support Trump’s NATIONAL EMERGENCY Declaration To Build The Wall?

Following Trump’s Rose Garden announcement, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) wasted little time in announcing its plan to sue the Trump Administration. The ACLU press release reads, in relevant part:

The ACLU will argue that President Trump’s use of emergency powers to evade Congressional funding restrictions is unprecedented and that 10 U.S.C. § 2808, the emergency power that Trump has invoked, cannot be used to build a border wall. Congress restricted the use of that power to military construction projects, like overseas military airfields in wartime, that “are necessary to support” the emergency use of armed forces.

Many conservative legal scholars disagree with the ACLU’s analysis. In particular, John Eastman of the Claremont Institute and John Yoo of Berkeley Law and the American Enterprise Institute, each of whom formerly clerked on the U.S. Supreme Court for Justice Clarence Thomas, have both expressed their belief that President Trump’s national emergency is being enacted declared pursuant to Congress’s delegated statutory authority. There is also the separate threshold question as to whether the ACLU would even have proper standing to sue, under Article III of the U.S. Constitution.

Washington Democrat Rep. Pramila Jayapal wants America to pay “reparations” to border crossers.

Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) said on Friday that the United States government should pay reparations to families that were separated after they entered the United States legally or illegally and faced immigration proceedings.

Jayapal appeared on MSNBC to talk about her interaction with Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker during a House Judiciary hearing on Friday, where she asked him about family separations.

“Our country is still reeling from the horror of family separations that occurred at the border,” Jayapal said ahead of questioning Whitaker.

I’m proud of my passion, Mr. Whitaker. We all should show real passion and a real commitment to fixing what was done to these families and these children. This is lasting trauma for thousands of children—we must make reparations. pic.twitter.com/hceesi4xk5

— Rep. Pramila Jayapal (@RepJayapal) February 9, 2019

By the time Democrats wake up and realize the harm they are causing, it will be too late.

TheHill

Published  2 months ago

President Trump on Wednesday decried The New York Times as "a true enemy of the people" a day after the news outlet published an extensive report detailing the ways in which he has sought to influence the investigations into his presidency and allies.

"The New York Times reporting is false," Trump tweeted. "They are a true ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE!"

The president did not refute any specific reporting from the news outlet.

The Times did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The newspaper reported Tuesday that Trump asked then-acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker late last year to put U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman in charge of the investigation in New York's Southern District into Trump's former lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Berman, an ally of Trump who donated to his 2016 campaign, had been recused from the investigation, and Whitaker did not act on Trump's request.

Trump dismissed the report when asked about it Tuesday afternoon.

“I don’t know who gave you that,” Trump said, calling the report "fake news."

A Department of Justice spokeswoman said in a statement that the White House has not asked Whitaker to interfere in investigations, pointing to his congressional testimony from earlier this month indicating as much.

The president has a well-documented track record of attacking the press, and The New York Times in particular. He has decried negative coverage of him and his administration as "fake news" and referred to reporters and news outlets as the "enemy of the people."

Earlier Wednesday morning Trump claimed writers "don't even call asking for verification."

The New York Times report on Trump's request to put Berman in charge of the Cohen investigation noted that the White House did not respond when given an opportunity to provide comment before publication.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  2 months ago

On Tuesday afternoon, the Senate invoked cloture to end debate on AG nominee Bill Barr and passed in a 55-44 vote.

The Senate then voted to confirm Bill Barr as Trump’s new Attorney General on Thursday.

Bill Barr secured enough votes in the Senate Thursday — Three Democrats voted to confirm Barr, Senator Joe Manchin (WV), Senator Doug Jones (AL) and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (AZ).

At the time of this publication, the vote is still open, although Bill Barr has the votes to secure his confirmation.

Update: The Senate confirmed Bill Barr as Trump’s new Attorney General in 54-45 vote.

Senate has the votes to confirm Barr as Attorney General. But vote is still open. Not final until they gavel it closed

— Chad Pergram (@ChadPergram) February 14, 2019

The vote to confrm William Barr as Attorney General has been open since 12:31 pm et. He has the votes to be confirmed. But the vote remains open

— Chad Pergram (@ChadPergram) February 14, 2019

It’s official – the gavel has come down.

Senate confirms William Barr as Attorney General, 54-45

Three Democrats voted aye.

Sens. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ), Doug Jones (D-AL) and Joe Manchin (D-WV).

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) was the lone GOP nay.

— Chad Pergram (@ChadPergram) February 14, 2019

Bill Barr will be taking over control of the Mueller investigation from Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

During his confirmation hearing, Bill Barr revealed he is Mueller’s best friend, so don’t expect Mueller’s inquisition to end any time soon.

Judicial Watch

Published  2 months ago

(Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch announced today that it sent an official complaint to the Justice Department’s Office of Inspector General (IG) calling for investigations into leaks of information about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The complaint asks for an investigation of any leaks to CNN about the controversial raid on the home of Roger...

Washington Examiner

Published  2 months ago

The Senate voted Thursday to confirm William Barr, President Trump’s pick to serve as his next attorney general.

Barr’s confirmation passed a 54-45 mostly party line vote in the GOP-led Senate. The vote came more than three months after Jeff Sessions, Trump's first attorney general, was fired.

Democrats who oppose Barr’s confirmation have criticized his ability to fairly oversee special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into the Trump campaign’s alleged collusion with Russians. Many said they were alarmed by a 20-page memo Barr authored in June questioning the legitimacy of the Mueller probe and making the case that Mueller should not demand Trump “submit to interrogation about alleged obstruction.”

Barr told Judiciary Committee lawmakers during his confirmation hearing his memo aimed to narrowly address the obstruction question and that he believes Mueller should be able to complete his investigation into alleged collusion.

“The Justice Department needs a leader who will be independent of the White House and who is able to stand up to President Trump, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, of California., who is the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, said. "Bill Barr hasn’t demonstrated that he would be that independent leader."

Despite complaints from most Democrats, three of them voted to confirm Barr: Doug Jones of Alabama, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona. Republican Rand Paul, R-Ky., who questioned Barr’s support of federal surveillance tactics, voted against him.

Barr won the overwhelming support of Republican senators, who praised his long career as a lawyer and former attorney general for President George H.W. Bush.

The position has been filled temporarily by Sessions’ chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, since Sessions was fired.

Fox News

Published  2 months ago

William Barr was confirmed Thursday by the Senate to serve as President Trump’s next attorney general, sending him to lead a Justice Department whose past officials have come under sharp criticism from the president over the ongoing Russia investigation.

www.theepochtimes.com

Published  2 months ago

News Analysis On Dec. 7, 2018, CNN published an article discussing events in the eight days following the ...

Fox News

Published  2 months ago

Veteran criminal defense attorney John Dowd has savaged Robert Mueller’s Russia probe as a "terrible waste of time" and questioned whether a report will ever be produced.

Dowd, who served as a member of President Donald Trump’s legal team from June 2017 until March 2018, made the explosive comments during an interview with ABC News.

“I will be shocked, if anything regarding the president is made public, other than, ‘we’re done’,” the 77-year-old said.

This is one of the greatest frauds this country's ever seen

— John Dowd

“I know exactly what he has. I know exactly what every witness said, what every document said. I know exactly what he asked. And I know what the conclusion or the result is.”

When pressed on what he believes the conclusion of the probe will be, Dowd unleashed a blistering attack.

“It's been a terrible waste of time… This is one of the greatest frauds this country's ever seen,” he said. “I'm just shocked that Bob Mueller didn't call it that way and say, ‘I'm being used.’ I would’ve done that.

FBI SCRAMBLED TO RESPOND TO HILLARY CLINTON LAWYER AMID WEINER LAPTOP REVIEW, NEWLY RELEASED EMAILS SHOW

“I'd have gone to Sessions and Rosenstein and said, "Look. This is nonsense. We are being used by a cabal in the FBI to get even.”

The 77-year-old’s explosive remarks fly in the face of public comments made by members of the Justice Department.

While being quizzed on the Russia probe during an oversight hearing last week, Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said he respects Mueller and his “ability to conduct this investigation”.

President Trump has repeatedly referred to the investigation as a “witch hunt”.

STAR POLITICAL

Published  2 months ago

As the Special Council’s investigation which was supposed to be limited to Russian Collusion begins to come to an end with absolutely NOTHING to show forth, top Dems are now shifting the blame to Robert Mueller.

According to The Washington Examiner, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) kicked off a torrent of criticism on Sunday, questioning whether “Mueller has adequately investigated President Trump’s financial dealings with a German bank,” and suggesting that Mueller’s investigation could be so woefully incomplete that the House has no choice but to resume investigating the president themselves.

“If the special counsel hasn’t subpoenaed Deutsche Bank, he can’t be doing much of a money laundering investigation,” Schiff said. “So that’s what concerns me, that that red line has been enforced, whether by the deputy attorney general or by some other party at the Justice Department. But that leaves the country exposed.”

Matthew Whitaker acting AG told Congress two weeks ago that Mueller was close to ending his probe, and the Senate Intelligence Committee told reporters including NBC News on Tuesday that after “two years and 200 interviews” they’re close to wrapping up their own investigation, having found no concrete evidence that the Trump campaign knowingly colluded with the Russians to steal the 2016 presidential election.

As noted by The Daily Wire, The revelations have clearly caused the Democrats to dramatically shift position on Mueller. Just six months ago, the Democrats were spearheading efforts to shield Mueller from the president’s criticisms and protect Mueller if the president decided to fire the Special Counsel, even going so far as to promise Mueller would find a job with the Democratic House Intelligence committee if he were summarily booted from the Justice Department.

As you can imagine this didn’t sit well with Democrats hell bent on removing a duly elected President.

If Trumps inauguration is any example of how liberals may react to the news, it is safe to say we may see a few tantrums, a significant amount of “safe spaces” open, and a shortage of crayons for a few weeks.

Coupled with The President’s approval rating now at the highest it’s ever been, Libs are in for a Rough month.

a 9-point jump in 10 days…

POLITICO

Published  2 months ago

Former acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will remain at the Justice Department despite William Barr’s being sworn in to lead the department.

Whitaker, who served as chief of staff to then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions until President Donald Trump tapped him for the acting role in November, is now a senior counselor in the associate attorney general’s office, a department spokesperson said Friday.

Attorney General William Barr was sworn in at the White House on Thursday after the Senate voted 54-45 to confirm him.

The Office of the Associate Attorney General, whose titular role is currently filled on an acting basis, oversees, among other things, the DOJ’s divisions on civil rights, antitrust, tax and the environment.

Whitaker was a controversial player in the president’s Cabinet, drawing backlash from congressional Democrats who protested his past public statements that were critical of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, an inquiry Whitaker oversaw during his time as acting attorney general. Democrats also attacked Whitaker for his time serving as an advisory board member for a patent company banned from the industry by the Federal Trade Commission for fraud.

The former acting attorney general was the first major Trump official to face a grilling by the House Democratic majority, testifying in a contentious hearing before the House Judiciary Committee last Friday.

Whitaker’s career plans had until now been something of a mystery. On Monday, a representative of the National Sheriffs’ Association offered the outgoing acting attorney general a gift after he wrapped up a speech to the organization during a Washington, D.C., conference.

“Great, is it a new job?” Whitaker quipped.

Mediaite

Published  2 months ago

Fox Business’ Lou Dobbs went on a rant blasting Republican leaders for, as he argued, not doing enough to stand by President Donald Trump amid what POTUS himself has dubbed “presidential harassment.”

He spoke with Congressman Andy Biggs and asked him why the leadership of his party isn’t doing more to stand up for Trump, bringing up House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler in particular given the back-and-forth over Acting AG Matthew Whitaker‘s testimony.

“One of those chairman who’s going after the president,” Dobbs said. “At what point do you believe––is there such a point––that the Republican party will rise up and say ‘The hell with you! This stops, and we mean now!’ Where is Mitch McConnell? Where is your minority leader? Is there anyone that has any kind of heart, any kind of soul left in the corporate-owned Republican party?!”

Biggs said they need “more people with hearts of lions” before slamming Nadler. But Dobbs brought things back to the GOP and asked, “Where are the voices of the Republicans on Capitol Hill?! Or do you guys all just simply represent the Chamber of Commerce, the business roundtable, the Koch brothers, Wall Street––I mean, who the hell do you represent?! You don’t raise your voices for integrity, for the working man and woman in this country, the middle class. Who the hell do you represent?!”

And he was clearly frustrated with the GOP, because the issue came up again later in his show.

In talking with former federal prosecutor Sidney Powell, Dobbs again talked about the Democratic investigations and said Trump shouldn’t have to “put up with that.” Powell agreed that Republicans “aren’t standing up for him like they need to.”

And Dobbs went off again, asking, “Why is the leadership of the Republican party filled with so many hollow carcasses?!”

You can watch above, via Fox Business.

[image via screengrab]

Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

USA TODAY

Published  2 months ago

As the special counsel probe grinds toward its conclusion, there are growing signs that Mueller will never say anything about his own investigation.

Breitbart

Published  2 months ago

Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) said on Friday that the United States government should pay reparations to families that were separated after they entered the United States legally or illegally and faced immigration proceedings.

Jayapal appeared on MSNBC to talk about her interaction with Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker during a House Judiciary hearing on Friday, where she asked him about family separations.

“Our country is still reeling from the horror of family separations that occurred at the border,” Jayapal said ahead of questioning Whitaker.

Jayapal told MSNBC host Joy Reid that the separations are “a heinous crime that has been committed on thousands of children.”

Jayapal slammed Whitaker for what she called a “dismissive” attitude and for saying that people have “a lot of passion” about children whose parents brought them to the border and an uncertain fate.

“This is an issue that I know there is a lot of passion about,” Whitaker said. “I appreciate your passion.”

“It’s something we share together,” Whitaker said.

“If we all don’t have real passion, real commitment to figuring out what happened and making reparations, the U.S. government should make reparations for what we have done to these families,” Jayapal said.

Jayapal posted the MSNBC interview on her Twitter account.

According to a Health and Human Services (HHS) press release from June, the difference in how immigration cases are adjudicated causes family separation.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Health and Human Services (HHS) have a process established to ensure that family members know the location of their children and have regular communication after separation to ensure that those adults who are subject to removal are reunited with their children for the purposes of removal. The United States government knows the location of all children in its custody and is working to reunite them with their families.

As part of the apprehension, detention and prosecution process, illegal aliens, adults and children, are initially detained by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) before the children are sent to HHS’ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) and parents to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody. Each entity plays a role in reunification. This process is well coordinated.

William Barr is expected to replace Whitaker next week if the Senate confirms him as the next Attorney General.

Diamond & Silk

Published  2 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker is no one’s puppet. He made this absolutely clear during a House Judiciary Committee when pressed by Democratic Congressman Eric Swalwell.

Swalwell, a potential 2020 presidential candidate, questioned Whitaker on the Mueller investigation and whether he would relay a message to President Trump.

According to the Washington Examiner, the Democrat asked Whitaker if he thought Mueller was conflicted, or whether he was running an honest investigation.

Whitaker said he thought Mueller was truthful and not conflicted.

Swalwell then asked Whitaker if he would echo the following line to Trump: “Mr. President, Bob Mueller is honest and not conflicted.”

“Congressman, I am not a puppet to repeat what you’re saying,” Whitaker responded. “I have answered your question as to what I believe about the special counsel.”

Whitaker then gestured to the House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold “Jerry” Nadler who said Swalwell was out of time.

Swalwell retorted that Whitaker did not answer the question and that he still wanted to hear his answer.

Whitaker said he had thought he did answer the question and had nothing further to say.

Check it out:

Here’s more on Whitaker from the Washington Examiner:

Whitaker took over as acting attorney general in November after then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions was forced from the position. He previously served as Sessions’ chief of staff.

Since taking over the Justice Department in an acting capacity, Whitaker has come under scrutiny for his past comments about Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with Russia.

His criticisms of the Russia probe led to calls for him to recuse himself from overseeing the investigation. However, the Justice Department said in December Whitaker would not step aside.

The House Judiciary Committee Hearing included a number of testy exchanges between Whitaker and Democrat lawmakers. The exchanges were called a “pony show” by Republican Congressman Doug Collins.

Check them out:

MAGAVoter

Published  2 months ago

Discussing acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, as well as the issue of family separation among illegal aliens detained in the US, Democrat Rep. Pramila Jayapal demanded "reparations" for detainees. Jayapal called the processing of detained illegal

American Greatness

Published  2 months ago

The Indecent Inquisitors

02/09 2:56 pm

Post by @theamgreatness.

Daily Ohio

Published  2 months ago

Democratic Rep. Pramila Jayapal (Wash.) said Friday that the United States government should pay reparations to be made to migrant kids who had been separated from their families at the border.

Jayapal was speaking to Joy Reid on MSNBC about a contentious interaction she had with acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker over family separations at the border.

“This is such a compelling issue, Joy, you and I have talked about it before,” Jayapal said, “Republicans and Democrats agree that this was a heinous crime that has been committed against thousands of children.”

“And so I think he really didn’t know what to do, so he tried to be dismissive,” she added.

“If we all don’t have real passion, real commitment,” she continued, “to figuring out what happened and making reparations, the U.S. government should make reparations for what we have done to these families.”

Jayapal didn’t detail what she meant by reparations to the migrant children or their families, but she reiterated her point on her social media account.

I’m proud of my passion, Mr. Whitaker,” she tweeted.

I’m proud of my passion, Mr. Whitaker. We all should show real passion and a real commitment to fixing what was done to these families and these children. This is lasting trauma for thousands of children—we must make reparations. pic.twitter.com/hceesi4xk5

— Rep. Pramila Jayapal (@RepJayapal) February 9, 2019

“We all should show real passion and a real commitment to fixing what was done to these families and these children,” she added. “This is lasting trauma for thousands of children—we must make reparations.”

Breitbart

Published  2 months ago

Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) said on Friday that the United States government should pay reparations to families that were separated after they entered the United States legally or illegally and faced immigration proceedings.

Jayapal appeared on MSNBC to talk about her interaction with Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker during a House Judiciary hearing on Friday, where she asked him about family separations.

“Our country is still reeling from the horror of family separations that occurred at the border,” Jayapal said ahead of questioning Whitaker.

Jayapal told MSNBC host Joy Reid that the separations are “a heinous crime that has been committed on thousands of children.”

Jayapal slammed Whitaker for what she called a “dismissive” attitude and for saying that people have “a lot of passion” about children whose parents brought them to the border and an uncertain fate.

“This is an issue that I know there is a lot of passion about,” Whitaker said. “I appreciate your passion.”

“It’s something we share together,” Whitaker said.

“If we all don’t have real passion, real commitment to figuring out what happened and making reparations, the U.S. government should make reparations for what we have done to these families,” Jayapal said.

Jayapal posted the MSNBC interview on her Twitter account.

I’m proud of my passion, Mr. Whitaker. We all should show real passion and a real commitment to fixing what was done to these families and these children. This is lasting trauma for thousands of children—we must make reparations. pic.twitter.com/hceesi4xk5

— Rep. Pramila Jayapal (@RepJayapal) February 9, 2019

According to a Health and Human Services (HHS) press release from June, the difference in how immigration cases are adjudicated causes family separation.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Health and Human Services (HHS) have a process established to ensure that family members know the location of their children and have regular communication after separation to ensure that those adults who are subject to removal are reunited with their children for the purposes of removal. The United States government knows the location of all children in its custody and is working to reunite them with their families.

As part of the apprehension, detention and prosecution process, illegal aliens, adults and children, are initially detained by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) before the children are sent to HHS’ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) and parents to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody. Each entity plays a role in reunification. This process is well coordinated.

William Barr is expected to replace Whitaker next week if the Senate confirms him as the next Attorney General.

Mediaite

Published  2 months ago

Former Nixon White House Counsel and key Watergate figure John Dean panned Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker‘s performance at today’s big House Judiciary Committee hearing.

CNN’s Brooke Baldwin spoke with him and said as they were watching, he said Whitaker “was playing way out of his league.”

“I felt that all the way through,” Dean said. “The first signal was when he was trying to tell the chairman he only had five minutes to ask a question. The chairman––he could take all day to ask the question if he wanted to.”

He is referring to when Chairman Jerrold Nadler asked Whitaker about whether he’s had to approve any request or action from the special counsel’s office, and Whitaker responded by saying, “Mr. Chairman, I see that your five minutes is up.”

After Baldwin showed the clip, Dean said, “That’s a rookie mistake.”

“I didn’t see him get more comfortable. I saw him get worn down at the end of the thing,” he continued. “He was totally unresponsive to virtually every question he was asked… It was not a good performance. It’s not attorney general quality performance. It’s acting at best.”

You can watch above, via CNN.

[image via screengrab]

Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

Fox News

Published  2 months ago

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas) snapped at Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker during his testimony before Congress Friday, telling him that making light of the proceedings was "not acceptable."

Jackson Lee took Whitaker to task as she asked House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler if she could have some of her five-minute questioning time restored after a disruption.

Whitaker, who earlier in the hearing called "time" on Nadler, interjected, "I don't know if your time's been restored or not."

Jackson Lee fired back at the perceived light-hearted comments, responding, "Mr. Attorney General, we're not joking here. And your humor is not acceptable."

She said that Congress has a duty and a right to ask him questions, and she told him that he needs to "behave appropriately," and she will do the same.

Jackson Lee went on to press Whitaker on if he had discussed Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation with President Trump or members of his administration.

Whitaker declined to get into the specifics of the ongoing investigation beyond his previous statement that he had no conversations with the president about the Mueller probe and he had not interfered in the investigation.

Watch the exchange above.

WATCH: Hearing Gets Contentious as Whitaker Tells Top Dem 'Your Five Minutes Is Up'

'Totally Unrealistic': Wallace Says Pelosi, Top Dems Just 'Paying Lip Service' to AOC's Green New Deal

Tomi Lahren on VA Dem Controversies: 'If These Men Were Republicans, They'd Be Ruined'

SARAH PALIN

Published  2 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker is no one’s puppet. He made this absolutely clear during a House Judiciary Committee when pressed by Democratic Congressman Eric Swalwell.

Swalwell, a potential 2020 presidential candidate, questioned Whitaker on the Mueller investigation and whether he would relay a message to President Trump.

According to the Washington Examiner, the Democrat asked Whitaker if he thought Mueller was conflicted, or whether he was running an honest investigation.

Whitaker said he thought Mueller was truthful and not conflicted.

Swalwell then asked Whitaker if he would echo the following line to Trump: “Mr. President, Bob Mueller is honest and not conflicted.”

“Congressman, I am not a puppet to repeat what you’re saying,” Whitaker responded. “I have answered your question as to what I believe about the special counsel.”

Whitaker then gestured to the House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold “Jerry” Nadler who said Swalwell was out of time.

Swalwell retorted that Whitaker did not answer the question and that he still wanted to hear his answer.

Whitaker said he had thought he did answer the question and had nothing further to say.

Check it out:

Here’s more on Whitaker from the Washington Examiner:

Whitaker took over as acting attorney general in November after then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions was forced from the position. He previously served as Sessions’ chief of staff.

Since taking over the Justice Department in an acting capacity, Whitaker has come under scrutiny for his past comments about Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with Russia.

His criticisms of the Russia probe led to calls for him to recuse himself from overseeing the investigation. However, the Justice Department said in December Whitaker would not step aside.

The House Judiciary Committee Hearing included a number of testy exchanges between Whitaker and Democrat lawmakers. The exchanges were called a “pony show” by Republican Congressman Doug Collins.

Check them out:

Rantt

Published  2 months ago

Democrats probe Trump's corruption, Nancy Pelosi claps back at the State of the Union, Jeff Bezos makes a consequential accusation, and more in week 107.

Sara A. Carter

Published  2 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker stood his ground Friday against hostile Democratic questioning about his private conversations with President Donald Trump, ongoing litigation and border security issues.

Although Whitaker did not divulge his private conversations with Trump, he did respond numerous times to multiple Democrats on one question regarding Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s office. He emphatically stated that he has never discussed the subject with Trump.

Whitaker and Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerry Nadler wrangled in several dramatic heated exchanges. Nadler pressed Whitaker, who became acting Attorney General last November, on his private conversations with Trump and other senior White House officials. Whitaker had already expressed at the onset of the hearing and earlier in the week that he would not divulge any private conversations with the president, as those conversations are protected by executive privilege.

“I do not intend today to talk about my private conversations with the President of the United States, but to answer your question, I have not talked to the President of the United States about the special counsel’s investigation,” said Whitaker.

Whitaker reiterated numerous times throughout the hearing that he has not interfered with Mueller’s investigation.

Despite Whitaker’s Statement on Mueller, Democrats Kept Asking

But it didn’t stop Democrats from pushing.

Rep. Val Demings, D-Florida, asked combative questions. She interrupted Whitaker multiple times as he attempted to answer her questions.

She questioned Whitaker’s truthfulness. Demings asked Whitaker if he ever talked to anyone in the White House about Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen. She then asked if Whitaker had ever discussed personnel at the Southern District of New York. Cohen is being charged with tax fraud, making false statements to a financial institution, unlawful campaign contributions and unlawful corporate contributions.

“Did you discuss with President Trump anything about Michael Cohen?” charged Demings, as her voice grew louder.

“Did you talk with anybody at all about reassigning or firing any personnel with the Southern District of New York? Anybody from the District of Virginia, firing or reassigning anyone at all,” she scowled.

“I am not going to discuss my private conversations with the President of the United States,” Whitaker responded.

Whitaker Debunks CNN Story

Later under questioning by Rep. David Nicola Cicilline, D-Rhode Island, Whitaker was asked about a CNN story alleging that Trump had lashed out at him several times when Cohen pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about the proposed Trump Moscow project.

This time he answered.

“Did the President lash out to you after Michael Cohen’s guilty plea about a Trump Organization project to build a tower in Moscow?” asked Cicilline.

“The president specifically tweeted that he had not lashed out,” he responded.

Cicilline then said “I’m asking you Mr. Whitaker, did the president lash out at you, I’m not asking what he tweeted. I don’t have a lot of confidence in the veracity of his tweets, I’m asking you.”

“No, he did not,” he said, after a short heated exchange.

Red Journalists

Published  2 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker slammed Rep. Eric Swalwell on Friday after the lawmaker asked if he thinks special counsel Robert Mueller is honest.

The lawmaker from California asked Whitaker at a House Judiciary Committee hearing to say, “Mr. President, Bob Mueller is honest and not conflicted.”

“Congressman, I am not a puppet to repeat what you’re saying,” Whitaker fired back. “I have answered your question as to what I believe about the special counsel.”

Earlier during the hearing, Whitaker told Swalwell he believes Mueller to be honest, but the lawmaker continued to push Whitaker to tell Trump he thinks the special counsel is also truthful and not conflicted.

President Trump called Robert Mueller a “conflicted prosecutor gone rogue” in November. Whitaker declined when pressed again on whether he thinks Mueller is honest.

“Congressman, I am not here to be a puppet to repeat terms and words that you say that I should say,” Whitaker said.

Whitaker gets upset with Swalwell's line of question about if he thinks Mueller is honest, says he's "not a puppet to repeat what you're saying" pic.twitter.com/pP1jPcfHpw

— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) February 8, 2019

Matthew Whitaker took over as acting AG in November after Trump fired Jeff Sessions. He previously served as Sessions’ chief of staff.

Since taking over the Justice Department, Whitaker has come under fire for his past comments about Mueller’s investigation.

His criticisms of the Russia probe led to calls for him to recuse himself from overseeing the investigation. However, the Justice Department said in December Whitaker would not step aside.

What are your thoughts on this? Please share and comment.

dailycaller

Published  2 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said Friday that he found it “deeply concerning” that a CNN crew was present at the FBI raid of Roger Stone’s home in late January.

“It was deeply concerning to me as to how CNN found out about that,” Whitaker told the House Judiciary Committee during a Justice Department oversight hearing.

Whitaker says he was concerned that a CNN crew was camping out outside Roger Stone’s house when he was arrested pic.twitter.com/V3RSmSuzkx

— Yahoo News (@YahooNews) February 8, 2019

Stone was indicted under seal on Jan. 24 in the special counsel’s investigation and arrested at his home in Florida the next day. A CNN camera crew filmed as 29 FBI agents stormed Stone’s house around 6 a.m. local time. (RELATED: How Exactly Did CNN Get Footage Of Roger Stone’s Arrest?)

Stone has alleged that CNN was tipped off to his indictment and arrest, while the network has denied the claim. CNN says it sent reporters to Stone’s home after its Washington-based journalists noticed a flurry of activity at the federal courthouse on the day Stone was indicted.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham asked for an FBI briefing on the raid Tuesday. Graham asked whether CNN had advance knowledge of the raid and whether the FBI used the appropriate force to conduct the arrest.

Whitaker did not say whether the Justice Department has evidence that CNN was tipped off to Stone’s indictment.

“The court had a sealed indictment that after Mr. Stone’s arrest was unsealed. Consistent with all its prior indictments, the DOJ’s basic policy for transparency in criminal cases is that the indictment is posted on the DOJ website, probably after it is unsealed, and then media outlets were notified,” said Whitaker.

“I do not know of any other special counsel’s office notice or DOJ notice to media outlets regarding Mr. Stone’s indictment, or his arrest,” he said.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  2 months ago

Nice. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker informed liberal hack Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) his time was up during testimony Friday in front of the House Judiciary Committee. Attorney General Whittaker: “Mr. Chairman, I see that your five minutes is up I’m here voluntarily I agreed to five-minute rounds.” Hah-Hah! Video: After Nadler went on a rant […]

Breitbart

Published  2 months ago

House Dems and Whitaker faced off Friday during a contentious six-hearing hearing focused primarily on the special counsel investigation. 

Dan Bongino

Published  2 months ago

Today’s ongoing House Judiciary Committee hearing for Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker was slammed as “pointless” and a form of “character assassination” by ranking GOP member Doug Collins (GA).

“This hearing is a character assassination on Acting Attorney General Whitaker, all pure political theater, to go after the president,” said Collins in his opening statement.

The congressman pointed out that Whitaker’s tenure was coming to a close. “By next Thursday, Bill Barr will be attorney general,” said Collins. “This gentleman is finishing up his term as acting attorney general.”

The congressman who then asked the committee to vote to abruptly end the hearing. The committee proceeded to vote, however the measure did not pass and the hearing went on as planned.

“The hearing follows an intense back and forth between the Justice Department and the Judiciary Committee a day earlier.

The Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to give [chairman Jerrold] Nadler the authority to issue a subpoena if necessary, despite Whitaker having already agreed to appear before the panel voluntarily.

Nadler made clear early Thursday that he did not want to have to subpoena Whitaker, but said a “series of troubling events” suggested it would be better for him to be prepared with that authority, just in case he decided not to show up for the hearing.

But Whitaker then warned he would not show up unless lawmakers dropped the threat.”

Whitaker wrote Nadler, “Consistent with longstanding practice, I remain willing to appear to testify tomorrow, provided that the Chairman assures me that the Committee will not issue a subpoena today or tomorrow and that the Committee will engage in good faith negotiations before taking such a step down the road.”

Nadler responded hours later, writing if Whitaker was “prepared to respond to questions from our members, then I assure you there will be no need for the committee to issue a subpoena on or before February 8.”

Watch Collins’ opening statement below:

For the full story, click HERE.

HuffPost

Published  2 months ago

Wallace said on Friday’s broadcast of “Outnumbered” that he found it “kind of rich that Republicans are so outraged that there would be this kind of a hearing of the other party’s president and administration.”

It came during an analysis of acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee.

“You know, it’s not like Republicans sat on their hands when Barack Obama was president,” Wallace said. “They investigated Benghazi, they investigated Fast & Furious, they investigated the IRS, and you know, look, those were all legitimate issues to investigate. Sometimes they found some things, sometimes they didn’t find things.”

Wallace noted how it was all “part of oversight.”

“When Republicans are, have oversight of a branch of Congress or a house of Congress and they’re investigating a Democratic president, they’re gonna make life difficult for them, and now the Democrats are in control of the House and have the control of these committees,” he said.

“That’s the way it works.”

WayneDupree.com

Published  2 months ago

Doug Collins, ranking member, bashed Democratic colleagues for trying to mislead others

Fox News

Published  2 months ago

A House hearing for Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker erupted in fireworks Friday morning, as the top Republican on the judiciary committee accused Democratic Chairman Jerrold Nadler of “character assassination” against the temporary head of the Justice Department and called the hearing a pointless “dog and pony show.”

“This hearing is a character assassination on Acting Attorney General Whitaker, all pure political theater, to go after the president,” Ranking Member Doug Collins, R-Ga, said in his opening statement while urging the committee to adjourn.

A vote was then taken on whether to abruptly end the hearing. The measure did not pass, and the hearing began as scheduled, with Whitaker addressing the issue Democrats are most interested in: his oversight of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe.

In his opening statement, he said he never offered "promises or commitments" regarding the Mueller or any other investigation.

"There has been no change in the overall management of the special counsel investigation," he said.

Whitaker also said he's been briefed and the probe and, during a tense exchange with Nadler, said he has not discussed the status with President Trump or senior White House officials.

The hearing follows an intense back and forth between the Justice Department and the Judiciary Committee a day earlier.

The Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to give Nadler the authority to issue a subpoena if necessary, despite Whitaker having already agreed to appear before the panel voluntarily.

Nadler made clear early Thursday that he did not want to have to subpoena Whitaker, but said a “series of troubling events” suggested it would be better for him to be prepared with that authority, just in case he decided not to show up for the hearing.

But Whitaker then warned he would not show up unless lawmakers dropped the threat.

“Consistent with longstanding practice, I remain willing to appear to testify tomorrow, provided that the Chairman assures me that the Committee will not issue a subpoena today or tomorrow, and that the Committee will engage in good faith negotiations before taking such a step down the road,” Whitaker wrote to Nadler.

Hours later, Nadler responded that if Whitaker appeared before the panel “prepared to respond to questions from our members, then I assure you there will be no need for the committee to issue a subpoena on or before February 8.”

Whitaker accepted the assurances and testified Friday.

The hearing Friday comes as the Senate is close to confirming President Trump’s nominee for attorney general, William Barr. The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday voted, along party lines, to advance Barr’s nomination to the full Senate for confirmation.

The president fired his first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, the day after the 2018 midterm elections. Prior to Whitaker’s appointment as acting attorney general, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein oversaw the Russia investigation.

Nadler and other Democrats have criticized Whitaker for not recusing himself from the Mueller probe, as Sessions did due to his involvement with the Trump campaign in 2016, as Whitaker had made public comments criticizing the investigation.

The hearing is the committee’s first major oversight hearing looking at the Justice Department of this Congress. Whitaker told reporters last week that Mueller’s probe was “close to being completed,” the first official sign that the investigation may be nearing an end. His comments, though, were a departure for the Justice Department, which rarely comments on the status of investigations. Whitaker, though, said he had been “fully briefed” on the probe.

Fox News' Jake Gibson and Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Washington Examiner

Published  2 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker on Friday snapped at Rep. Eric Swalwell after the lawmaker asked if he thinks special counsel Robert Mueller is honest, and refused to answer the question because he's "not a puppet."

Swalwell, D-Calif., asked Whitaker at a House Judiciary Committee hearing to say, “Mr. President, Bob Mueller is honest and not conflicted.”

“Congressman, I am not a puppet to repeat what you’re saying,” Whitaker replied. “I have answered your question as to what I believe about the special counsel.”

The acting attorney general earlier told Swalwell he believes Mueller to be honest, but the California Democrat continued to push Whitaker to tell Trump he thinks the special counsel is also truthful and not conflicted.

[Read more: Sheila Jackson Lee gets in nasty dust-up with Acting AG Whitaker]

The president in November called Mueller a “conflicted prosecutor gone rogue.” Whitaker declined when pressed again on whether he thinks Mueller is honest.

“Congressman, I am not here to be a puppet to repeat terms and words that you say that I should say,” Whitaker said.

Whitaker took over as acting attorney general in November after then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions was forced from the position. He previously served as Sessions’ chief of staff.

Since taking over the Justice Department in an acting capacity, Whitaker has come under scrutiny for his past comments about Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with Russia.

His criticisms of the Russia probe led to calls for him to recuse himself from overseeing the investigation. However, the Justice Department said in December Whitaker would not step aside.

dailycaller

Published  2 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker delegated time to House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler on Friday while he was testifying in front of the committee, and the exchange drew a reaction.

“Mr. Chairman, I see that your five minutes is up,” Whitaker told Nadler during a contentious round of questioning regarding his involvement with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling.

“I’m here voluntarily,” Whitaker continued. “We’ve agreed to five-minute rounds.”

After an uproar ensued among the crowd, Georgia Rep. Doug Collins, the Republican ranking member of the House Judiciary, recommended that the committee take a break from further questioning. (RELATED: Matthew Whitaker: ‘Deeply Concerning’ Than CNN Was At Roger Stone Raid)

“I will point out that we didn’t enforce the five-minute rule on acting attorney general Whitaker,” Nadler responded and demanded that he answer if he “asked to approve any requests or action” for the special counsel.

President Donald Trump appointed Whitaker to serve as the acting attorney general after former Attorney General Jeff Sessions was forced to resign. With the elevation, Whitaker assumed control of oversight of the Mueller’s probe.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

Chicks On The Right — Young Conservatives

Published  2 months ago

Hannah Bleau

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker is testifying before the House Judiciary Committee, and at this point, it’s pretty clear he knows he has nothing to lose. Did you hear the gasp heard ’round the world?

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker tells House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler "I see that your five minutes is up" when asked if President Trump ever requested that Whitaker take action against special counsel Robert Mueller. https://t.co/2nySmKwaK3 pic.twitter.com/imwkvIn3ic

This version is my fav.

This may be the best moment from Acting Attorney General Whitaker's hearing so far.https://t.co/k3ZbiAQuJD pic.twitter.com/MNmipwboYb

— Townhall.com (@townhallcom) February 8, 2019

It’s safe to say that the entire hearing has been fairly contentious.

That brings me to this. Rep. Jackson Lee lost her cool with Whitaker.

Rep. Jackson Lee: "Mr. Attorney General, we're not joking here, and your humor is not acceptable. Now you are here because we have a constitutional duty to ask questions, and the Congress has the right to establish government rules." pic.twitter.com/k1dtaymEwV

— NBC News (@NBCNews) February 8, 2019

Fireworks on Capitol Hill. House Democrats are squelching the Acting Attorney General's one-liners and wisecracks. pic.twitter.com/fzWK9ni3Xw

— Josh Campbell (@joshscampbell) February 8, 2019

LOL. She’s so mad.

NEW: “Mr. Attorney General, we're not joking here, and your humor is not acceptable," Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee tells Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker in contentious moment. "I need to have my time restored so that you can behave appropriately." https://t.co/4vh4SSGWcp pic.twitter.com/W3Rd0ojZaC

— World News Tonight (@ABCWorldNews) February 8, 2019

Whitaker: "I will not be your puppet and repeat what you want me to repeat"

— Kambree Kawahine Koa (@KamVTV) February 8, 2019

Fox News

Published  2 months ago

President Trump on Saturday blasted “vicious” Democrats for their conduct during a House Judiciary Committee hearing a day earlier that featured Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker -- and saw fiery exchanges between Whitaker and House Democrats.

Fox News

Published  2 months ago

Fox News host Tucker Carlson on Friday night aired video of the FBI’s arrest of President Trump’s longtime adviser Roger Stone, questioning the agency’s show of force -- and why a CNN camera crew was at the scene an hour before authorities arrived just before dawn on Jan. 25.

“Until now the only public footage of the raid came from CNN, which somehow knew to arrive one hour before the FBI got there,” Carlson said, before showing a clip of Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker being asked about CNN’s presence at the raid during a congressional hearing.

"It was deeply concerning to me as to how CNN found out about that," Whitaker said.

WHO'S BEEN CHARGED BY MUELLER IN THE RUSSIA PROBE SO FAR?

Security footage shows an SUV with a CNN cameraman parked across the street from Stone's Fort Lauderdale, Fla., home. The cameraman got out and began filming when FBI personnel arrived an hour later.

Carlson also took issue with the way the raid was conducted.

A team of 29 heavily armed FBI agents in tactical gear arrived at the residence and pounded on the front door, the footage shows. Stone, 66, is seen barefoot and wearing a black T-shirt emblazoned with the phrase “Roger Stone did nothing wrong.” He comes out with his hands raised above his head and is put in handcuffs.

“The footage depicts what you’d expect if the FBI raided the home of a Mexican drug lord, maybe even SEAL Team 6 going into [Osama] bin Laden’s compound,” Carlson said.

The show of force has prompted criticism of the tactics of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s office. Stone pleaded not guilty later that day to making false statements to Congress about contacts with WikiLeaks during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Like many conservatives, Carlson has raised suspicions that Stone's arrest was politically motivated.

“The FBI and their water carriers in corporate media tells us, 'Totally commonplace.' 'By the book.' "Happens all the time,'" Carlson said as he ended his segment.

Breitbart

Published  2 months ago

In an appearance on Fox News Channel’s “The Ingraham Angle” on Thursday, Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), the ranking Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, commented on his Democratic counterpart chairman Rep. Adam Schiff’s (D-CA) push to have Acting U.S. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker testify in front of the committee.

Whitaker had said he would not testify if the committee exercised its authority to subpoena him as a witness.

Nunes asked as to why Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who was originally responsible for the probe into allegations of Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election that is led by special counsel Robert Mueller to testify before the committee.

“I don’t know why you would want Whitaker — he’s been the acting AG for a month,” Nunes said. “Why not bring Rod Rosenstein in, who started the special counsel, who it has been leaked that he is going to be leaving? Why would you not bring him in to talk about everything?”

The Gateway Pundit

Published  2 months ago

Another prosecutor has left Mueller’s team and returned to the DOJ as the special counsel investigation reportedly enters its final stages.

Scott Meisler left the special counsel witch hunt in December, a spokesman for the special counsel said, but will remain active on cases related to the Russia witch hunt that he was assigned to before his departure, reported The Hill.

“Scott Meisler concluded his detail with the Special Counsel’s Office in December 2018 and returned to the Criminal Division but continues to represent the office on specific pending matters that were assigned to him during his detail,” spokesman Peter Carr said.

Scott Meisler was an appellate lawyer in the Justice Department’s Criminal Division for several years before joining the Mueller team in the summer of 2017. He specializes in surveillance and fraud cases.

As TGP’s Joe Hoft previously reported, Meisler worked on the Manafort and Gates case, though he has not appeared in court hearings.

The Mueller inquisition is reportedly winding down according to Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and Senator Chuck Grassley.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said in a presser last Monday that he has been fully briefed on Mueller’s investigation and that it is close to being completed.

“The investigation is, I think, close to being completed, and I hope that we can get the report from Mueller as soon as we — as possible,” Whitaker added.

Senator Grassley said this week that he expects Mueller’s report within a month.

Fox News

Published  2 months ago

After a tense back-and-forth between congressional Democrats and the Justice Department, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler announced Thursday evening that Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, likely in his final days as the country's chief law enforcement officer, will appear Friday as scheduled before the panel.

TheHill

Published  2 months ago

A prosecutor working with Robert Mueller's office of the special counsel has exited the team and returned to the Justice Department as news reports indicate that the investigation could be nearing its conclusion.

Scott Meisler left the special counsel probe in December, a spokesman told CNN, but remains active on cases related to the Mueller probe to which he was assigned before his December departure.

"Scott Meisler concluded his detail with the Special Counsel's Office in December 2018 and returned to the Criminal Division but continues to represent the office on specific pending matters that were assigned to him during his detail," the special counsel's office said.

A spokesman for the special counsel's office didn't immediately confirm CNN's reporting when contacted Wednesday.

Reports of Meisler's departure come days after acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker told reporters that the probe was "close to being completed."

“I hope that we can get the report from Director Mueller as soon as possible,” he said at the end of January.

The special counsel's investigation has reentered headlines in recent weeks with the arrest and indictment of Roger Stone, a former adviser and longtime confidant of President Trump, on charges of witness tampering and obstruction.

Stone has entered a plea of not guilty, and vowed to fight the special counsel's efforts to prosecute him or the president.

“The idea that a 29-member SWAT team in full tactical gear with assault weapons would surround my house, 17 vehicles in my front yard, including two armored vehicles, a helicopter overhead … and that I would open the door looking down the barrel of assault weapons, that I would be frog-marched out front barefooted, handcuffed when they simply could have contacted me,” Stone said of his arrest last month.

Breitbart

Published  2 months ago

Friday on MSNBC, Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA) said acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker was "disrespectful toward the process," while testifying before | Clips

Dan Bongino

Published  2 months ago

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) said yesterday that he believes Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s final report will be released “within a month,” Business Insider reports.

Speaking to radio host Hugh Hewitt, Grassley also said the American people deserve transparency with respect to Mueller’s investigation into the Trump campaign and the phony allegations of Russian collusion.

“I don’t care what the report says. The public ought to know what their 25 or 35 million bought. And except for national security and privacy of individuals… everything else I think ought to be out.”

Business Insider states, “Grassley spokesman Taylor Foy said the senator’s estimates ‘weren’t based on any specific information, but rather growing media speculation and reports that it may be wrapping up.'”

On Jan. 28, Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into the Trump campaign and Russia is nearing its end.

“The investigation is, I think, close to being completed and I hope that we can get the report from Mueller as soon as possible,” he said.

Whitaker made the statement during a press conference where the DOJ announced it was charging Chinese company Huawei and its CFO for stealing trade secrets.

Whitaker became Acting Attorney General in November and faced a barrage of criticism from liberals and Democrats who claimed he should recuse himself from the Mueller investigation because he had publicly criticized the probe in the past.

Rantt

Published  2 months ago

Jeff Bezos makes a truly remarkable accusation, President Trump feels the heat from House Democrats, and other news you should know about.

Rantt Rundown, Day 749 of Trump’s presidency – Today’s top stories:

1. The blackmail of Bezos: Jeff Bezos, Founder of Amazon and owner of The Washington Post, published a truly remarkable piece on Medium. In it, Bezos alleges an attempt on the part of American Media Inc. (AMI), the parent company of the National Enquirer, to blackmail him with nude photos and text messages between himself and Lauren Sanchez. Bezos published emails that appear to confirm representatives of AMI threatened to publish these photos and messages if Bezos didn’t stop his investigation into how they obtained his private messages the National Enquirer previously published. Bezos is also probing whether or not their coverage is politically motivated, claiming: “For reasons still to be better understood, the Saudi angle seems to hit a particularly sensitive nerve.”

AMI, who we know purchased Karen McDougal’s affair story on behalf of Donald Trump, is known to “catch and kill” stories, so this blatant extortion isn’t all too surprising, but the manner they went about it surely is. They targeted the richest man in the world, who clearly isn’t moved by the same motivations as their other targets. Bezos has signaled there are others: “If in my position I can’t stand up to this kind of extortion, how many people can? (On that point, numerous people have contacted our investigation team about their similar experiences with AMI, and how they needed to capitulate because, for example, their livelihoods were at stake.)”It’s important to note that the Chairman and CEO of AMI, David Pecker, has been granted immunity and is cooperating with federal prosecutors who probed Michael Cohen and Donald Trump’s conduct.

2. Trump lashes out at checks and balances: President Trump awoke today feeling triggered by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff’s wide-ranging probe into his corruption, finances, and Russia ties. “PRESIDENTIAL HARASSMENT” he tweeted. We responded:

What Trump calls “presidential harassment” is actually the House executing on their constitutional duty to hold Trump accountable for his unprecedented corruption.

Actual presidential harassment is falsely claiming the first black POTUS was born in Kenya.https://t.co/cp3Lx21JPL

— Rantt Media (@RanttMedia) February 7, 2019

House Intel isn’t the only committee who is increasing their oversight. Today, the House Ways and Means Committee began laying the groundwork for their effort to obtain President Trump’s tax returns. Also, the House Energy and Commerce Committee held a hearing on the Trump administration’s migrant child separation policy and their inability to properly track and reunite families. In related news, after Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker tried to seek an assurance he will not be subpoenaed if he testifies, the House Judiciary Committee will question the acting AG tomorrow at 9:30 am ET about his conversations with the White House about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

3. Mueller update: Today, we learned that Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort continued his Ukraine lobbying work into 2018 even while under investigation. In a court filing, prosecutors allege that Manafort met with Russian Intelligence operative Konstantin Kilimnik several times, including when Kilimnik was in DC for the inauguration as well as in February 2017 and 2018. They discussed the Russia-Ukraine peace plan (which would’ve lifted sanctions). We were already aware they had discussed this in August 2016 when Manafort handed campaign polling data to Kilimnik. It’s unclear whether this is related to the Ukraine Peace plan Trump’s former fixer Michael Cohen and associate Felix Sater worked on and reportedly delivered to former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.

This is only a partial segment of our Rantt Rundown newsletter. To get the full newsletter in your inbox every evening, please subscribe below.

Rantt Media’s comprehensive articles source reporting from top news organizations, but they’re also built on brilliant analysis from our team. We are independently-owned and strive for quality, not clicks. But the only way to truly have a media for the people is for media to be funded by the people. We take pride in being reader-funded so that we are beholden to you, not corporate interests. If you like the work we do, please consider supporting us by signing up for a monthly subscription.

www.theepochtimes.com

Published  2 months ago

Commentary For more than a year, various media outlets, journalists, and social media personalities have spun narratives outlining ...

American Greatness

Published  2 months ago

After what seemed to be a done deal following a relatively smooth public hearing last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee now has delayed until February 7 the vote to confirm William Barr, President Trump’s nominee for attorney general. The reason, according to news reports, is lingering concerns about how Trump’s incoming attorney general would manage the investigation of Special Counsel Robert Mueller, which is soon expected to conclude.

Despite Barr’s repeated assurances that he will follow Justice Department rules in his handling of Mueller’s final report, as well as a pledge to resist any attempted interference by the White House, Democrats on the committee remain unconvinced. “[Barr’s] answer was not particularly reassuring or clear as to the public disclosure of the Mueller report,” Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii) told MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell earlier this week.

Democrats also have accused Barr of bias against the Mueller investigation based on a detailed memo he authored last year that objected to the special counsel’s reported interest in whether President Trump obstructed justice. Some have suggested Barr should recuse himself from the investigation, which would be a repeat of a terrible mistake made by former Attorney General Jeff Sessions in 2017.

The committee’s vote is scheduled to take place one day before acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker testifies in front of the House Judiciary Committee on a number of topics, including the Mueller probe; Trump foes claim Whitaker should have recused himself from oversight of the investigation based on some of his past comments, even though a Justice Department ethics review cleared him of any conflicts.

This one-two punch has a purpose: To taint Barr’s impartiality and discredit his office on all matters related to Trump-Russia. Why? Because during his confirmation hearing, Barr agreed—at the behest of Republican senators—to begin his own inquiry into who, why, and how the FBI launched several investigations into Trump’s presidential campaign and, eventually, into the president himself.

As indictments unrelated to Trump-Russia collusion pile up, Republican lawmakers and Trump’s base increasingly are outraged that the culprits behind perhaps the biggest political scandal in American history remain untouched. Barr signaled that the good fortune of these scoundrels could soon take a dramatic shift under his stewardship.

A few days before Barr’s hearing, the New York Times reported that in May 2017, the FBI opened an investigation into the sitting U.S. president purportedly based on suspicions he was a Russian foreign agent. Then-acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe—whom the Times does not mention by name at any time in the 1,800 words it took to report this information—initiated the probe immediately after Trump fired his predecessor, James Comey.

McCabe was fired last year and now is under criminal investigation for lying to federal agents.

“The decision to investigate Trump himself was an aggressive move by FBI officials who were confronting the chaotic aftermath of the firing of Comey and enduring the president’s verbal assaults on the Russia investigation as a witch hunt,” according to the Times. Just days after McCabe opened the investigation into President Trump, it was handed over to Mueller’s team.

That news did not sit well with Republicans on Capitol Hill. A clearly-agitated Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) raised the matter with Barr during his opening comments, reading aloud the Times’ headline from its January 11 front-page bombshell. “Would you promise this committee to look into this and tell us whether or not…a counterintelligence investigation was opened up at the FBI against President Trump? Have you ever heard of such a thing in all the time you’ve been associated with the Department of Justice,” the committee chair asked the nominee.

Barr, the former attorney general for President George H. W. Bush, replied that he had never heard of such a situation.

Graham then ticked off a list of names tied to the scandal, including McCabe, Peter Strzok, Lisa Page, Bruce and Nellie Ohr, and Christopher Steele. He mentioned Fusion GPS and that its political opposition research in the form of the “dossier” was used as evidence to secure a FISA warrant to spy on Trump campaign aide Carter Page. Barr pledged to the committee that he would review whether the certification given to the FISA court by bad actors such as Comey and former acting Attorney General Sally Yates on the Page application was accurate. (The Justice Department’s inspector general is also reviewing potential FISA abuses related to the Page case.) Providing false information to the court is perjury.

The South Carolina Republican seems serious about his mission to clean up the Justice Department and hold people accountable. On Wednesday, he sent a letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray, demanding answers about the agency’s pre-dawn raid at the home of former Trump confidant Roger Stone and whether the arrest was leaked to CNN. (LOL) Wray has until February 5 to reply.

As Mueller’s work winds down and the public becomes increasingly weary of the sideshow that has yet to produce one charge related to collusion, Democrats, the media and NeverTrumpers are extremely nervous that their dependable cacophony of distraction in cries of “Trump-Russia collusion!” will be gone. Unless the final report produces some major bombshell about Trump or anyone in his orbit, Americans will re-examine what the purpose of this whole exercise was, and fume at the wasted time and money. Some will even question whether the political impartiality of that agency can be trusted again. Many will want answers and it appears as though Barr, in tandem with Senate Republicans, are set to deliver.

Barr could take immediate action once he’s confirmed, focusing on low-hanging fruit, including further declassification of the Page FISA application; the release of emails and texts between key Justice Department officials including Comey and McCabe; and any materials related to the interrogation of former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. The testimony of witnesses who appeared before the congressional committee also should be made public, as requested last year by congressional Republicans.

Other materials of public interest include the initiating documents for Crossfire Hurricane, the FBI’s investigation into four Trump campaign aides—which Comey claimed he never saw—and any details about who at the FBI started the unprecedented counterintelligence and criminal investigation into a sitting U.S. president.

And while he’s at it, and before Mueller’s team is finished, Barr should begin a formal inquiry into why the special counsel’s office scrubbed the iPhones used by Peter Strzok and Lisa Page while they worked for Mueller for a brief time in 2017. The phones and the data contained on those devices are public property. Barr needs to find out why that information was not collected and archived since both FBI officials already were under scrutiny. Destroying potential evidence is a crime.

The enormousness of Barr’s task and the devastating consequences for those involved are now coming into clear view. The timing couldn’t be worse for Democrats and NeverTrump Republicans who are desperate to defeat Trump and the GOP in 2020. That’s why we can expect both parties to whip up more criticism of Barr over the next few months. One hopes he will resist that criticism—and both Trump and Graham need to reassure the new attorney general and the American public that his investigation will receive the same amount of protection that was afforded to the Mueller team.

Content created by the Center for American Greatness, Inc. is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a significant audience. For licensing opportunities for our original content, please contact licensing@centerforamericangreatness.com.

Photo Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

TASS

Published  2 months ago

MOSCOW, January 31. /TASS/. US Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into Russia’s alleged interference in the US presidential election has produced no materials (available from open sources) thus far that might be worthy of attention, Russian presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov said on Thursday.

"In open sources we have not seen any materials that might deserve attention or be called serious," Peskov told the media, adding he knew nothing about some Mueller probe-related documents reportedly uploaded in Internet from Russian IP addresses.

"There has been too much fuss over the Mueller investigation," he remarked.

"Miller (the CEO of Russia’s gas giant Gazprom) is far more efficient than Mueller. I can state this with certainty," Peskov said with a smile.

Mueller’s investigation into alleged attempts by Russia to intervene in the US presidential election is about to be completed, US Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said on Monday.

Since May 2017 Special Counsel Robert Mueller has been probing into claims the Russian authorities tried to influence the 2016 US presidential election. President Donald Trump and his aides have repeatedly dismissed all suspicion of unlawful contacts with Russian officials during the election campaign. Moscow, too, has many times denied attempts to influence the US election.

The Independent

Published  2 months ago

Donald Trump’s former political adviser Roger Stone says that his former boss’ presidency is in big danger.

Mr Stone, who on Tuesday pleaded not guilty to seven charges brought forward by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office, said that the Russia investigation that brought him to court is basically a “speeding bullet heading for” Mr Trump’s head.

The remarks were made on “Breitbart News Daily”, a Sirius XM radio show.

The statement comes just after acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker said on Monday that he believes Mr Mueller’s investigation is nearing its end, ramping up speculation after nearly two years of a tight-lipped probe into Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Mr Stone is among at least 34 people to have been charged in relation to the investigation, and is one of several Trump allies to be caught up in probe.

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Others have included individuals like former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, who was convicted last year for financial crimes.

Mr Trump’s former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, has also been charged, and last year pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mr Mueller’s probe.

In Mr Cohen’s plea and subsequent cooperation, the president’s former “fixer” said that he had lied to Congress about conversations with Mr Trump over a major deal to build a Trump property in Moscow.

He also indicated that he had paid off adult film actress Stormy Daniels during the campaign for the president, a felony violation of campaign finance laws.

The president has insisted repeatedly that he and his campaign did not collude with the Russian government during the campaign, and has repeatedly argued that he is not a focus of investigation for Mr Mueller’s probe.

It is not clear when the investigation may actually end, or whether the special counsel’s final report will be made public.

POLITICUSUSA

Published  3 months ago

House Democrats are investigating acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker to determine if he has ever improperly shared information about special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation with President Trump or his lawyers.

In his position as acting Attorney General Whitaker has learned sensitive information about the investigation by participating in Justice Department briefings. Democrats believe that this put him in a position to serve as a “mole” spying on Mueller for the benefit of the president.

House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, (D-N.Y.), wrote a letter to Whitaker that was sent yesterday, in which he addressed these questions. Reportedly Nadler wanted Whitaker to have advance notice of the questions the House Judiciary Committee wants to ask so that he can consider if he will invoke executive privilege and refuse to answer certain questions the committee will have for him.

In his letter Nadler wrote:

“Short of a direct and appropriate invocation of executive privilege, I will expect you to answer these questions fully and to the best of your knowledge. I would view with considerable skepticism any effort to decline to answer on the basis that the inquiry is related to an ongoing criminal investigation.”

“Please take any steps that may be necessary for the White House to consider these communications and for the President to determine whether he will invoke executive privilege.”

The questions Nadler gave to Whitaker “relate to whether there has been interference with the special counsel’s work,” the chairman said, and “do not relate to the underlying substance of the investigation.”

The acting Attorney General is scheduled to appear before the Nadler’s committee on February 8. This will be his first testimony before a congressional committee since he was appointed to his current position after Trump fired former Attorney General Jeff Sessions in November.

Whitaker will also be the first Trump administration official to testify before a House committee since Democrats took control on January 3.

Nadler said he also plans to ask Whitaker about his December announcement that he would not recuse himself from oversight of the Mueller investigation. This announcement caused a great deal of concern among House Democrats.

Sessions did recuse himself, causing Trump to blame him for the Mueller probe. This eventually led to his firing by the president.

Nadler said he also wants to know if Whitaker has had any communication of any kind with Trump or any other White House official about recusal. He’s especially interested in discussions about recusal that took place before Whitaker was appointed by Trump to the position of acting Attorney General.

In refusing to recuse himself, Whitaker rejected the advice of a Justice Department ethics official. This puts him in position to have oversight of the special counsel’s investigation, which he had previously criticized.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s office, however, is still involved with the management of the special counsel’s investigation on a day-to-day basis.

Nadler also said that he wants to know if Trump has reacted to the guilty plea of Michael Cohen, his former lawyer, to him. Trump reportedly “lashed out” at Whitaker after the guilty plea, Nadler noted, and he wants to know if Whitaker has “taken any action” as a result.

Whitaker will also be asked if Trump expressed “concern, anger, or similar frustration” at the Southern District of New York, which prosecuted Cohen for a series of financial crimes connected to the president.

“I intend to ask you about these conversations with the White House because I believe that the independence of the Department has been placed at risk,” wrote Nadler, calling Whitaker’s testimony “vital” to the committee’s oversight of both Mueller’s investigation and the Justice Department.

Whitaker will serve in his current position until a permanent Attorney General is confirmed. William Barr was nominated by Trump in December and it is expected that he will confirmed by the Senate within a few weeks. No vote to confirm Barr has yet to be scheduled on the floor of the Senate, leaving Whitaker in charge for now.

There is no question that Donald Trump appointed Matthew Whitaker to his current position because he thought Whitaker would take orders and work for him instead of for the American people. If this has happened, it is fairly certain that Jerry Nadler will get to the bottom of it and bring to public light whatever dark secrets Matthew Whitaker has.

dailycaller

Published  3 months ago

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was absent for oral arguments again on Monday, as the Supreme Court entered its second week short of a full complement on the bench.

Ginsburg’s absence was previously announced and she will continue to participate in the week’s cases.

“Justice Ginsburg will continue to work from home next week and will participate in the consideration and decision of the cases on the basis of the briefs and the transcripts of oral arguments,” a Supreme Court spokeswoman said in a Friday statement.

Surgeons at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York removed two cancerous nodules from the justice’s lungs in December 2018. The procedure is called a pulmonary lobectomy.

Despite Ginsburg’s continued absence, the court said her prognosis is positive and no further treatment is expected.

“Her recovery from surgery is on track,” the statement added. “Post-surgery evaluations indicate no evidence of remaining disease, and no further treatment is required.”

Indeed, aside from Ginsburg’s absence at oral arguments, it does not seem that she has missed any official business. The Supreme Court released orders in pending cases and petitions on Friday and again on Monday. Those orders generally indicate if a particular justice did not participate in the consideration of a given matter. Since those orders did not contain such a disclosure, it appears Ginsburg was involved in those decisions.

The court’s January sitting will conclude on Wednesday. Thereafter, the justices will not hear arguments again until Feb. 19. That month-long interval provides a lengthy recuperation period for Ginsburg. (RELATED: Supreme Court Turns Down Challenge To Matthew Whitaker’s Appointment As Acting AG)

Still, some conservatives remain bullish on the prospect of a third Supreme Court appointment during President Donald Trump’s first term. The Daily Caller reported that the administration and its allies in the conservative legal movement were making “gingerly preparations” for another vacancy in early January.

GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, the newly installed chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told “Fox News Sunday” that he will make the confirmation of a conservative jurist his top priority should a nomination come before the panel.

“I hope Justice Ginsburg serves for a long time, but if there’s an opening on this court, I’m going to be hell-bent to put a conservative to replace whoever steps down for whatever reason,” Graham said Sunday.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

Fox News

Published  3 months ago

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham kicked off Tuesday’s confirmation hearing for William Barr, President Trump's attorney general nominee, by saying the Justice Department needs a new leader to “right the ship over there.”

duplicitousdemocracy

Published  3 months ago

The Oregonian found at least five Saudi nationals who vanished before they faced trial or completed their sentence including accused rapists, hit-and-run drivers and a man with child porn on his co…

POLITICO

Published  3 months ago

Pelosi’s move to derail Trump’s State of the Union address underscores her aggressive challenge to the president.

Fox News

Published  3 months ago

(Multnomah County Sheriff’s Department)

Saudi Arabia is believed to have aided the escape of one of its citizens from the U.S. after he was charged in a fatal hit-and-run -- and that extraction may not have been a one-time occurrence.

Abdulrahman Sameer Noorah fled America to his home country of Saudi Arabia after he was charged in the death of a 15-year-old girl in August 2016. Saudi Arabia helped Noorah bond out of jail and obtain a passport so he could leave the country, officials said, and the Kingdom didn’t make Noorah’s whereabouts known until June 2018.

SAUDI NATIONAL CHARGED IN FATAL HIT-AND-RUN OF OREGON TEEN BELIEVED TO HAVE ESCAPED TO KINGDOM, REPORT SAYS

The Oregonian on Sunday identified four other cases in which Saudi Arabia helped its own get out of legal binds. The five cases were all similar – all men who were studying at a university or college in Saudi Arabia, all disappeared while facing jail time and all of their current whereabouts are relatively unknown.

“This is even more evidence that the Saudi government has acted to help its citizens escape justice for crimes committed in Oregon,” Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., told The Oregonian.

Abdulaziz Al Duways, Waleed Ali Alharthi, Suliman Ali Algwaiz and Ali Hussain Alhamoud were all identified as receiving help from Saudi Arabia to flee the U.S. amid criminal investigations.

Al Duways was accused of rape at Western Oregon University in December 2014 after he allegedly gave a woman marijuana and shots of whiskey, according to the newspaper. When police arrived at the scene, the woman was crying in the man’s bed and he reportedly told her to tell police she was his girlfriend.

He was charged with first-degree rape, his bail was set at $500,000 and he was ordered to hand over his passport, The Oregonian reported, citing court records. Days later, the Saudi consulate in Los Angeles posted 10 percent of his bail so he could be released from jail. Soon after, he disappeared.

Alharthi was studying at Oregon State University when authorities say they found dozens of child porn videos on his computer, the newspaper reported. He was charged with 10 counts of first-degree encouraging child sex abuse in August 2014. The Saudi consulate in Los Angeles paid his bail.

Days after he failed to show up for a status check in April 2015, officials discovered he left Oregon for Mexico City and boarded a plane for Paris a week later, according to The Oregonian.

Algwaiz, a Portland State University student, pleaded no contest in August 2016 to third-degree assault and driving under the influence of intoxicants. He was drunk when he struck and injured a homeless man as he was driving the wrong way down a street, police said.

He was sentenced to 90 days in jail, which he was allowed to serve on weekends, The Oregonian reported. He managed to recover his passport from Portland police in September 2016 and days later disappeared. Noorah disappeared around the same time as Algwaiz.

Alhamoud, an Oregon State University student at the time, was indicted on multiple sex-crime charges, including first-degree rape in February 2012. The Saudi government had bailed him out of jail and he fled the country the same day, the newspaper reported, citing a criminal complaint.

Wyden has called on Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker for explanations in these cases.

“Secretary Pompeo and the Justice Department need to do a thorough investigation to determine the scope of this abuse of our justice system and start by answering the questions I asked,” he told The Oregonian.

dailycaller

Published  3 months ago

The Supreme Court rejected an unusual challenge to Matthew Whitaker’s appointment as acting attorney general Monday.

The challenge arose in the context of a Second Amendment case from Nevada, where an independent political activist named Barry Michaels challenged a provision of the Federal Gun Control Act which prohibits convicted felons from possessing firearms. Michaels’ convictions were for non-violent crimes and he has lived in accordance with the law for 20 years.

Whitaker became the named defendant in Michaels’ case when he was appointed acting AG. Shortly thereafter, Michaels and his attorneys filed a motion at the Supreme Court challenging Whitaker’s appointment.

The motion argued that a federal law called the Attorney General Succession Act controls the accession of leadership at the Department of Justice. That law provides that the Deputy Attorney General should become the acting AG when a vacancy in that office arises. As such, Michaels said Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is the rightful acting AG, not Whitaker.

Michaels also raised a constitutional issue, arguing that the appointments clause requires Senate confirmation for all principal officers of the government, even those serving in an acting capacity. Whitaker was chief of staff to former Attorney General Jeff Sessions prior to his appointment, which is not a Senate-confirmable position.

The justices rejected that motion in a brief order Monday morning. As is typical of such matters, the order was unsigned and no explanation was provided. (RELATED: Supreme Court To Review Illegal Immigrant’s Gun Possession Conviction)

Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh filed a similar motion in an ongoing Affordable Care Act case before a federal trial court in Baltimore.

The Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, which advises the executive branch on a range of legal issues, issued an advisory opinion confirming the legality of Whitaker’s appointment in November 2018.

President Donald Trump has since nominated William Barr for the attorney generalship. Barr will appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee for a confirmation hearing on Tuesday.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

Fox News

Published  3 months ago

To view this page ensure that Adobe Flash Player version 10.2.0 or greater is installed.

The Senate Judiciary Committee holds a hearing on the nomination of William Barr for the position of attorney general on Tuesday.

Barr is expected to face questions on Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign and immigration policy, among others.

Matthew Whitaker was named acting attorney general after Jeff Sessions resigned from the post in 2018. Barr previously served as attorney general under late President George H.W. Bush from 1991 to 1993.

Fox News' Kaitlyn Schallhorn contributed to this report.

Kathleen Joyce is a breaking/trending news producer for FoxNews.com. You can follow her at @Kathleen_Joyce8 on Twitter.

Breitbart

Published  3 months ago

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is overseeing a revision of the Justice Department’s guidelines regarding how investigators can obtain records from members of the media, with a particular focus on leaks, according to The Hill’s John Solomon.

The proposed revision, in which Rosenstein assumed a larger role after Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ November departure, included a watered-down threshold for DOJ prosecutors to meet before subpoenaing a journalist’s records. The new guidelines, if approved, would allow the department to issue a subpoena without first notifying the reporter’s news organization of its intent to obtain documents, the report states.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker has reportedly voiced concerns about the plan in the last few weeks, worrying the rule changes could attract negative headlines as President Donald Trump is locked in negotiations to end the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. “After a lengthy period of turmoil and regular criticism from President Trump, DOJ has enjoyed a period of calm normalcy that has put employees’ focus back on their work and not the next tweet. Matt doesn’t want to disrupt that unless a strong legal case can be made,” one source told Solomon.

In August, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced his agency was “reviewing” media subpoena policies for reporters who cite anonymous sources in leaking classified information. Sessions, flanked by Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, said at the news conference that federal law enforcement agencies would ramp up efforts to stem the tide of information leaks emanating from within the Trump administration, revealing the DOJ had tripled the number of leak investigations since the president took office.

The government’s war on leaks has seen its share of high-profile causalities, including top FBI and Congressional officials.

Acting on the recommendation of the FBI’s Office of Professional Responsibility, Sessions fired the bureau’s deputy director Andrew McCabe, citing “unauthorized” disclosures to the reporters and lacking candor about it under oath. Federal prosecutors have impaneled a grand jury as part of an investigation into whether McCabe intentionally misled investigators about improperly leaking information to a reporter.

In October, James Wolfe, a former employee of the Senate Intelligence Committee, pleaded guilty to one count of making a false statement to the FBI “during the course of an investigation into the unlawful disclosure of classified national security information.”

In the past, the department has been reluctant to demand reporters reveal an anonymous source of disclosed classified information. However, when subpoenaed to testify, reporters face the possibility of being jailed for contempt of court if they refuse to identify a requested source.

New York Times reporter Judith Miller was jailed for 85 days in 2005 after refusing to divulge the source of a classified leak that revealed the identity of undercover CIA agent Valerie Plame, whose husband had drawn the ire of officials in former President George W. Bush’s administration.

Miller was released from federal prison only after her source, later confirmed as I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby, chief of staff to former Vice President Dick Cheney, identified himself. Libby was subsequently sentenced to federal prison for violating federal law by revealing classified information.

The United Press International contributed to this report.

gellerreport

Published  3 months ago

Why would a racist, violent, dangerous organization like the Nation of islam be receiving taxpayer dollars in the first place?. Smells like Obama.

Breitbart

Published  3 months ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — The incoming chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee said Wednesday that attorney general nominee William Barr has confidence in special counsel Robert Mueller and will let him complete his Russia investigation.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said after meeting with Barr, who led the Justice Department under President George H.W. Bush, that Barr has a “high opinion” of Mueller. Barr was spending most of Wednesday on Capitol Hill, meeting senators on the committee before his confirmation hearing next week.

“He had absolutely no indication he was going to tell Bob Mueller what to do or how to do it,” Graham said.

President Donald Trump pushed out Attorney General Jeff Sessions in November and made Sessions’ chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker, the acting attorney general before nominating Barr in December.

Trump’s critics have expressed concern that Barr may try to curtail Mueller’s investigation, which Trump repeatedly has called a “hoax” and a “witch hunt.” Also, Barr wrote an unsolicited memo to the Justice Department last year critiquing Mueller’s investigation into whether the president sought to obstruct justice by firing James Comey as FBI director.

Graham said Barr also told him about his longtime relationship with Mueller. Barr and Mueller worked together when Barr was Bush’s attorney general from 1991 to 1993 and Mueller oversaw the department’s criminal division. Graham said that the two men were “best friends,” that their wives attended Bible study together and that Mueller had attended the weddings of Barr’s children.

“So his opinion of Mr. Mueller is very, very high in terms of ethics and character and professionalism,” Graham said.

Graham listed a number of questions that he had put to Barr: “I asked Mr. Barr directly, ‘Do you think Mr. Mueller is on a witch hunt?’ He said no. ‘Do you think he would be fair to the president and the country as a whole?’ He said yes. ‘And do you see any reason for Mr. Mueller’s investigation to be stopped?’ He said no. ‘Do you see any reason for a termination based on cause?’ He said no. ‘Are you committed to making sure Mr. Mueller can finish his job?’ ‘Yes.’”

Graham said Barr said that if he were attorney general, he would “err on the side of transparency” when he eventually received Mueller’s report.

The senator said Barr also told him that he has a high opinion of Rod Rosenstein, the current deputy attorney general who has so far overseen the Mueller investigation and is expected to leave office if Barr is confirmed.

“Mr. Rosenstein mentioned to him when they first met, I think, that two years would probably be enough,” Graham said. “He has got some ideas of a deputy. I told him to pick somebody you are comfortable with and that the president can approve, and I trust his judgment to find a worthy successor to Mr. Rosenstein.”

Barr also met with several other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, including the outgoing committee chairman, Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa, who said he believes Barr’s experience “ought to make his nomination very easy.” Sen. John Cornyn of Texas said after his meeting that he is pleased that Barr would be “what I would call a ‘traditional law and order’ attorney general.”

Barr was also scheduled to meet with Sens. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Ben Sasse, R-Neb.

True Pundit

Published  3 months ago

Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Monday called on the Department of Justice to immediately halt federal funding to the Nation of Islam, after the Washington Examiner first reported that the group has received hundreds of thousands of dollars from the government to teach religious studies programs to prison inmates.

In a letter to the Justice Department obtained by the Washington Examiner, Buchanan called the report “disturbing” and said the government’s funding of the openly anti-Semitic black separatist group was “downright immoral.”

“As you may know, the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center have designated the Nation of Islam as a hate group for its racist and anti-Semitic beliefs,” Buchanan wrote in the letter to acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

“The federal government should not use taxpayer dollars to subsidize one of the most infamous hate groups in the United States,” Buchanan added. “That’s why I’m demanding your department immediately cease all contracts with the Nation of Islam and prohibit it from receiving any contracts in the future.”

Buchanan also asked the Department of Justice to “undertake a full review of all ongoing and future contracts to ensure that the U.S. government is not financing domestic or foreign hate groups.” – READ MORE

JNS.org

Published  3 months ago

(January 8, 2019 / JNS) Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.) called on the U.S. Department of Justice to end funding for the Nation of Islam.

The Washington Examiner first reported this development and the funding of “at least $364,500 in contracts and awards” from the DOJ and the U.S. Bureau of Prisons between fiscal 2008 and fiscal 2019.

“The fact that hard-earned American tax dollars are being funded to this extremist group is not only unacceptable, it’s downright immoral,” the congressman wrote in a letter on Monday to Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

“As you may know, the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center have designated the Nation of Islam as a hate group for its racist and anti-Semitic beliefs,” he continued. “Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan has used hateful rhetoric pronouncing that ‘Hitler was a very great man’ and routinely denounces Jews and white people as ‘evil.’ ”

The funding was allocated towards “Nation of Islam religious services,” “Nation of Islam spiritual guide services,” “Nation of Islam study services” and other programming administered by the group’s leaders, according to Bureau of Prisons records.

“The federal government should not use taxpayer dollars to subsidize one of the most infamous hate groups in the United States,” said Buchanan. “That’s why I’m demanding your department immediately cease all contracts with the Nation of Islam and prohibit it from receiving any contracts in the future.”

The Bureau of Prisons declined to provide specifics to The Washington Examiner about the funding, citing a regulation that federal correctional institutions “may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain cannot personally deliver due to, ordinarily, religious prescriptions or ecclesiastical constraints to which the chaplain adheres.”

“The Nation of Islam considers whites to be devils and aspires to break off a blacks-only country from the United States. It’s an ugly phenomenon that minimally overlaps with the normative religion of Islam,” Middle East Forum president Daniel Pipes told JNS. “It’s not exactly something the American taxpayer should be subsidizing.”

The Republican Jewish Coalition, the National Council of Israel and the Endowment for Middle East Truth (EMET) commended Buchanan’s letter.

“We share Congressman Buchanan’s interest in getting answers to the troubling questions raised by the Examiner’s report,” RJC spokesperson Neil Strauss told JNS.

“Because we believe that the Trump administration agrees with Rep. Buchanan that the federal government ‘should not use taxpayer dollars to subsidize one of the most infamous hate groups in the United States,’ we are confident that these serious concerns will be addressed promptly and definitively,” he added.

“We completely support the efforts of Congressman Buchanan and share his outrage,” National Council of Young Israel president Farley Weiss told JNS. “We supported the [FIRST STEP Act] and see contracting with this anti-Semitic organization as being the antithesis of rehabbing prisoners. We call for such funding to be stopped.”

“EMET applauds Rep. Vern Buchanan’s call on the DOJ to stop funding the highly anti-Semitic, racist group, the Nation of Islam. Under the leadership of renowned anti-Semite Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam regularly disseminates conspiracy theories about Jews and the State of Israel,” the organization’s founder and president, Sarah Stern, told JNS.

“In one instance, Farrakhan said, ‘Satanic Jews have infected the whole world with poison and deceit’ and are his ‘enemy.’ In another, he exclaimed, ‘I am not an anti-Semite, I am anti-termite,’ comparing Jews to sub-humans, indeed to parasitic insects,” she continued.

“It is outrageous that the U.S. government would fund such a despicable group to propagate its hateful rhetoric, and as Rep. Buchanan has expressed in its letter, federal funding for the Nation of Islam must be halted immediately,” she added.

Zionist Organization of America president Mort Klein echoed the above sentiments: “Rep. Buchanan is correct –– why on Earth would the federal government give taxpayer dollars to the Nation of Islam, a group that has been identified for decades as a vicious hate group, led by the notorious black supremacist and anti-Semite Louis Farrakhan?”

He continued, “Would we ever fund a program under the auspices of racist David Duke? Of course not!”

“It is irrelevant that the money allegedly goes towards the NOI giving religious studies for prison inmates,” added Klein. “And this funding only strengthens and gives legitimacy to Farrakhan’s bigoted organization.”

He also mentioned, “In [light] of the fact that the NOI is a hate group, one should have the gravest concern as to what the NOI teaches prison inmates. In any event, taxpayer funding of NOI should cease at once.”

POLITICUSUSA

Published  3 months ago

The days of the House of Representatives protecting Donald Trump are over, says Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell, a member of the powerful House Judiciary Committee.

In an interview with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes on Monday, Swalwell said that Democrats plan to subpoena Trump’s attorney general Matthew Whitaker to make sure he isn’t rigging or undercutting the Mueller investigation in order to protect the president.

“He cannot hide from our committee as he would have been able to if Democrats had not won Congress,” the Democratic lawmaker said. “We will subpoena him.”

That subpoena will be upheld in courts, and he’s going to have to defend his investigation and whether or not he’s made any promises to President Trump,” Swalwell added.

.@ericswalwell says Trump AG Matthew Whitaker will be forced to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. #ctl #p2 pic.twitter.com/62SuiPPeuH

— PoliticusUSA (@politicususa) January 8, 2019

Rep. Swalwell said:

He cannot hide from our committee as he would have been able to if Democrats had not won Congress. Presidential immunity is over, Chris. We will subpoena him. That subpoena will be upheld in courts, and he’s going to have to defend his investigation and whether or not he’s made any promises to President Trump. We would rather see that done voluntarily. This is the United States. It shouldn’t be adversarial for the people’s attorney general to come to Congress and tell the American people what his priorities are and whether he can uphold a lawful investigation.

Democrats are ready to take on Trump

The reason Donald Trump chose Matthew Whitaker to be the acting attorney general is that he believed Whitaker would do his bidding. After all, before replacing Jeff Session as the AG, Whitaker had publicly cast doubt over the Mueller investigation.

With Republicans in control of Congress at the time of his appointment, Trump knew they would happily look the other way as he elevated Whitaker to the attorney general post.

But the floor has shifted quickly beneath Trump. His days of using the Department of Justice as his personal puppet are over. Democrats have subpoena power and they aren’t afraid to use it when necessary.

justice

Published  3 months ago

Prosecution Dismantled International Sex Trafficking Organization that Forced Young Women and Girls from Mexico and Central America into Prostitution for Over a Decade

Last week in federal district court in Brooklyn, New York, five members of a notorious international criminal organization, known as the Rendon-Reyes Trafficking Organization, were sentenced to prison terms of 15 to 25 years by United States District Court Judge Edward R. Korman. The amount to be paid in restitution will be announced at a later date. Three other defendants are set to be sentenced on Jan. 15. The defendants previously pled guilty to racketeering, sex trafficking, and other federal charges following their arrests in Mexico and the United States, where they were residing illegally. For over a decade, the Rendon-Reyes Trafficking Organization, based in Tenancingo, Tlaxcala, Mexico, smuggled numerous young women and girls from Mexico and Central America into the United States and forced them to engage in prostitution for the Organization’s profit, generating hundreds of thousands of dollars in criminal proceeds that were then laundered back to Mexico. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York and the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division prosecuted this case.

“These well-deserved sentences reflect the gravity of the human trafficking crimes these defendants committed,” said Acting Attorney General Whitaker. “The defendants operated an extensive sex trafficking enterprise that preyed on vulnerable young women and girls, deceiving them with false promises, coercing their compliance, and compelling them into submission through beatings, threats, isolation, and intimidation. This prosecution is the result of strong partnerships among the Eastern District of New York, the Civil Right Division’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit, the New York Office of the Department of Homeland Security’s Homeland Security Investigations, and our Mexican law enforcement counterparts. The sentences imposed in this case demonstrate our unwavering commitment to working across international borders to dismantle transnational trafficking networks and seek justice on behalf of victims and survivors.”

“These sentencings are the latest chapter in this Office’s long-term commitment to eradicate human trafficking and all forms of modern-day slavery,” stated United States Attorney Donoghue. “The crimes committed by the members of the Rendon-Reyes Trafficking Organization were brutal and shocking, and I hope that the sentences give the victims in this case some sense of justice. We will not tolerate the exploitation of women and girls for profit or sexual servitude.”

“These individuals will now face the consequences of their callous criminal actions exploiting women and girls whom they forced into sex slavery for profit. The investigation and prosecution that led to today’s sentencings speak to the strong bilateral relationship between the United States and Mexico, in which both nations are committed to holding accountable those engaged in the ruthless act of human trafficking,” said Homeland Security Investigations Executive Associate Director Derek Benner. “Investigating human trafficking remains a priority for HSI, whose primary focus is to rescue victims and release them from the grip of their captors. HSI will continue leveraging all of its investigative capabilities to disrupt human trafficking syndicates no matter where in the world they operate.”

The defendants were sentenced to the following prison terms: Jovan Rendon-Reyes, aka Jovani, 32, of Mexico, was sentenced to 20 years in prison; Saul Rendon-Reyes, aka Satanico, 41, of Mexico, was sentenced to 15 years in prison; Felix Rojas, 48, of Mexico, was sentenced to 25 years in prison; Odilon Martinez-Rojas, aka Chino or Saul, 47, of Mexico, was sentenced to over 24 years in prison; and Severiano Martinez-Rojas, 53, of Mexico, was sentenced to over 24 years in prison. Severiano Martinez-Rojas was also sentenced in a related case in the Northern District of Georgia. Those proceedings were transferred to the Eastern District of New York for entry of the defendant’s guilty plea last year, and the cases were consolidated for last week’s sentencing. Defendants Jose Rendon-Garcia, aka Gusano, 35, of Mexico, Guillermina Rendon-Reyes, 48, of Mexico, and Francisco Rendon-Reyes, aka Pancho, 30, of Mexico, will be sentenced on Jan. 15.

According to documents filed in court, between December 2004 and November 2015, members of the Rendon-Reyes Organization, including the defendants, enriched themselves by forcing multiple young women and girls, including the 12 referenced in court documents, to perform countless commercial sex acts throughout the United States and Mexico. The Organization targeted vulnerable women and girls, some as young as 14, from impoverished areas of Mexico and Central America. Male members of the Organization typically used false promises of love and marriage to lure the victims into fraudulent romantic relationships. In some instances, they forcibly abducted the victims, and on one occasion, a victim’s child. Members of the Organization frequently arranged for others to smuggle the victims across the border and into the United States. Once in the United States, members of the Organization utilized different methods to force the victims to engage in prostitution, including severe and repeated beatings, sexual assaults, forced abortions, threats to the victims, their families and children, and psychological harm. Members of the Organization forced the victims to perform as many as 45 sex acts a night and took all of the prostitution proceeds, funneling the money back to Mexico.

The investigation, prosecution, bilateral enforcement action, and extraditions of the defendants apprehended in Mexico were coordinated through the U.S.-Mexico Bilateral Human Trafficking Enforcement Initiative. Since 2009, the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security have collaborated with Mexican law enforcement counterparts in a Bilateral Human Trafficking Enforcement Initiative to more effectively dismantle human trafficking networks operating across the U.S.-Mexico border, bring human traffickers to justice, and restore the rights and dignity of human trafficking victims. These efforts have resulted in successful prosecutions in both Mexico and the United States, including U.S. federal prosecutions of over 170 defendants in multiple cases in New York, Georgia, Florida, and Texas, in addition to numerous Mexican federal and state prosecutions of associated sex traffickers. The convictions in this case are also the latest development in the Eastern District of New York’s comprehensive anti-trafficking program, which has to date indicted more than 80 defendants, assisted more than 150 victims, including 45 minors, reunited 19 victims’ children with their mothers, and secured restitution orders of over $4 million on behalf of trafficking victims.

The investigation of the Rendon-Reyes Trafficking Organization was led by HSI New York’s Trafficking in Persons Unit, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, and the Department of Justice’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit, with assistance from HSI Mexico City Attaché Office, the Department of Justice’s Office of International Affairs, the State Department, Interpol and the New York City Police Department. Assistance was also provided by the FBI’s Atlanta Division, and the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Northern District of Georgia. The government of Mexico, including Mexico’s Procuraduría General de la República and Policía Federal, also played a prominent role in advancing the bilateral anti-trafficking enforcement efforts in this case. Non-governmental victim service providers and advocates also dedicated efforts to restore and improve the lives of survivors of trafficking and their families.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband for the Civil Rights Division, U.S. Attorney Richard P. Donoghue of the Eastern District of New York, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Executive Associate Director Derek Benner made the announcement today.

The case against the Rendon-Reyes Trafficking Organization was investigated by HSI New York’s Trafficking in Persons Unit, and is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Taryn A. Merkl and Margaret Lee of the Eastern District of New York and Deputy Director for Litigation Benjamin J. Hawk of the Civil Rights Division’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  3 months ago

On Monday, Congressman Vern Buchanan (R-FL) demanded the Department of Justice immediately cut off federal funding to the Nation of Islam.

The letter addressed to AG Matthew Whitaker cited the Washington Examiner’s December of 2018 report which revealed the Nation of Islam was receiving hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal funding to teach Islam to prison inmates.

According to the Examiner, Nation of Islam leaders have received at least $364,500 in contracts and awards from the U.S. Bureau of Prisons and the Department of Justice between fiscal 2008 and fiscal 2019.

Thanks, Obama!

“As you may know, the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center have designated the Nation of Islam as a hate group for its racist and anti-Semitic beliefs,” Buchanan wrote.

“The federal government should not use taxpayer dollars to subsidize one of the most infamous hate groups in the United States,” Buchanan added. “That’s why I’m demanding your department immediately cease all contracts with the Nation of Islam and prohibit it from receiving any contracts in the future.”

In June of 2018 Louis Farrakhan tweeted about the “satanic Jew.”

In October Louis Farrakhan compared Jews to termites.

In November Louis Farrakhan led chants of “Death to America!” in Tehran.

Our federal government has no problem giving a domestic terrorist organization like Nation Islam money while they withhold funding for the border wall. Let that sink in.

1-7-2019 VB Letter to DOJ by on Scribd

Washington Examiner

Published  3 months ago

Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Monday called on the Department of Justice to immediately halt federal funding to the Nation of Islam, after the Washington Examiner first reported that the group has received hundreds of thousands of dollars from the government to teach religious studies programs to prison inmates.

In a letter to the Justice Department obtained by the Washington Examiner, Buchanan called the report “disturbing” and said the government’s funding of the openly anti-Semitic black separatist group was “downright immoral.”

“As you may know, the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center have designated the Nation of Islam as a hate group for its racist and anti-Semitic beliefs,” Buchanan wrote in the letter to acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

“The federal government should not use taxpayer dollars to subsidize one of the most infamous hate groups in the United States,” Buchanan added. “That’s why I’m demanding your department immediately cease all contracts with the Nation of Islam and prohibit it from receiving any contracts in the future.”

Buchanan also asked the Department of Justice to “undertake a full review of all ongoing and future contracts to ensure that the U.S. government is not financing domestic or foreign hate groups.”

The Nation of Islam, a black nationalist group run by Louis Farrakhan, preaches that white people are “blue-eyed devils” and Jews are “the synagogue of Satan." Its leaders have received at least $364,500 in contracts and awards from the Department of Justice, through the Bureau of Prisons, between fiscal 2008 and fiscal 2019.

The funding was designed to provide "Nation of Islam religious services," "Nation of Islam spiritual guide services," "Nation of Islam study services," and other related programming led by the organization’s leaders, according to Bureau of Prison records.

One of the organization’s key texts, "The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews," claims that Jews were responsible for the transatlantic slave trade and rigged the world economic system to disenfranchise black people.

The Bureau of Prisons declined last month to provide any details about the contracts, including what year they began and what Nation of Islam reading materials were used for the program. “Contracts are retained six years after final payment, so we are not able to provide details regarding the original contract on which the Nation of Islam began contracting with the Bureau of Prisons," a spokesperson told the Washington Examiner.

The spokesperson cited a regulation that federal correctional institutions "may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain cannot personally deliver due to, ordinarily, religious prescriptions or ecclesiastical constraints to which the chaplain adheres."

The Nation of Islam declined to comment to the Washington Examiner last month. However, one of the group’s leaders defended the federal funding in a subsequent blog post, calling it “a great benefit and blessing to the American Penal System.”

Washington Examiner

Published  3 months ago

Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Monday called on the Department of Justice to immediately halt federal funding to the Nation of Islam, after the Washington Examiner first reported that the group has received hundreds of thousands of dollars from the government to teach religious studies programs to prison inmates.

In a letter to the Justice Department obtained by the Washington Examiner, Buchanan called the report “disturbing” and said the government’s funding of the openly anti-Semitic black separatist group was “downright immoral.”

“As you may know, the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center have designated the Nation of Islam as a hate group for its racist and anti-Semitic beliefs,” Buchanan wrote in the letter to acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

“The federal government should not use taxpayer dollars to subsidize one of the most infamous hate groups in the United States,” Buchanan added. “That’s why I’m demanding your department immediately cease all contracts with the Nation of Islam and prohibit it from receiving any contracts in the future.”

Buchanan also asked the Department of Justice to “undertake a full review of all ongoing and future contracts to ensure that the U.S. government is not financing domestic or foreign hate groups.”

The Nation of Islam, a black nationalist group run by Louis Farrakhan, preaches that white people are “blue-eyed devils” and Jews are “the synagogue of Satan." Its leaders have received at least $364,500 in contracts and awards from the Department of Justice, through the Bureau of Prisons, between fiscal 2008 and fiscal 2019.

The funding was designed to provide "Nation of Islam religious services," "Nation of Islam spiritual guide services," "Nation of Islam study services," and other related programming led by the organization’s leaders, according to Bureau of Prison records.

One of the organization’s key texts, "The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews," claims that Jews were responsible for the transatlantic slave trade and rigged the world economic system to disenfranchise black people.

The Bureau of Prisons declined last month to provide any details about the contracts, including what year they began and what Nation of Islam reading materials were used for the program. “Contracts are retained six years after final payment, so we are not able to provide details regarding the original contract on which the Nation of Islam began contracting with the Bureau of Prisons," a spokesperson told the Washington Examiner.

The spokesperson cited a regulation that federal correctional institutions "may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain cannot personally deliver due to, ordinarily, religious prescriptions or ecclesiastical constraints to which the chaplain adheres."

The Nation of Islam declined to comment to the Washington Examiner last month. However, one of the group’s leaders defended the federal funding in a subsequent blog post, calling it “a great benefit and blessing to the American Penal System.”

TheHill

Published  3 months ago

Certain common aphorisms were never meant to be taken literally. “What doesn’t kill you only makes you stronger” is a particularly risky principle by which to live. A watched pot will indeed boil. Time does not heal all wounds. “Slow and steady” does not always win the race. President Trump added a new — and, for him, potentially dangerous — aphorism on Friday, when asked about impeachment. He said he was not at all concerned because “you can’t impeach somebody that’s doing a great job.”

The president was hopefully making an aspirational, not a literal, point — because a president can be entirely successful in office yet rightfully be impeached for committing “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” Indeed, no matter how successful a president may be in various policies, the commission of any impeachable offense means, by definition, that he or she is not doing a “great job.”

Trump’s statement was unnerving not only because he has said it before but because he is entering the most dangerous period of his term so far. With Democrats now controlling the House of Representatives — and some already stating their intentions, intemperately or even profanely like Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) — the White House is about to be hit with a torrent of document demands and subpoenas from a half-dozen committees.

Committee chairmen have promised to demand answers on Trump’s taxes, foreign business dealings, family charity and other areas beyond the still-ongoing Russia investigation. These moves reflect a strategy that not only targets Trump but is counting on Trump to be successful. They are relying on Trump’s self-description as a “counterpuncher” to supply the grounds of his removal. Yes, a president can counterpunch himself into impeachment.

Despite the filing of articles of impeachment on the first day of House Democratic control, there is not a strong basis for a single article at this time. Thus far, the strongest basis is the money paid to two women to silence them about alleged affairs with Trump before the election. Yet, while highly damaging, these allegations can be difficult to prosecute and occurred before Trump took office. An in-kind campaign contribution simply is not a strong stand-alone issue for impeachment.

Likewise, there still is no compelling basis to allege a crime based on obstruction or theories of collusion. That leaves Democrats with a House majority secured, at least in part, on promises of impeachment but without a clear, impeachable act.

Special counsel Robert Mueller could well supply the missing “high crime and misdemeanor,” of course, but the only other possible source is Trump himself. And, as he demonstrated during the James Comey debacle, Trump has the ability to do himself great harm by acting impulsively or angrily.

His firing of Comey as FBI director was not the problem; an array of Democrats and Republicans, as well as career prosecutors, felt Comey deserved to be dismissed. Instead, it was the timing: Rather than firing Comey upon taking office, Trump waited and then fired him after inappropriately questioning him on the Russia investigation and asking for leniency for a former associate, retired general Michael Flynn. Trump also reportedly called for the firing of Mueller, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, only to be deterred by his staff.

Democrats now have the chance to see if they can trigger an impeachable offense by hitting Trump across a broad range of subjects, including his tightly held business and tax records. Hammered by subpoenas and demands, they are hoping that the unpredictable Trump could commit an impulsive and destructive act. Consider just a few possible “scores” that this strategy could produce if President Trump walks into an impeachment trap.

First, firing frenzy. The biggest score would be a frustrated Trump ordering the firing of Mueller. Trump could be faced by not one but multiple special counsel reports in 2019, as well as ongoing litigation against indicted individuals. If reports are correct, he repeatedly has raised the idea of firing Mueller. That would cross a red line for some Republican senators and add “official acts” to an alleged pattern of obstruction.

Second, false statements. Unlike President Bill Clinton, who knowingly lied under oath (and was later found by a federal court to have committed perjury), Trump has not spoken under oath and only given limited answers in writing to a few questions from the special counsel. Now, Congress will be demanding answers not just from Trump but from his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and others in the White House. Lying to congressional investigators is a crime. If Trump tries to spin facts or gives false information, he would commit an impeachable offense.

Third, witness tampering. Equally dangerous is an allegation of shaping or inducing testimony. Trump has shown a continuing refusal to observe lines of separation from the investigation. Just recently, a report alleged that he called acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker to complain about the New York prosecutors pursuing campaign-finance violations. If he speaks with potential witnesses about their knowledge or accounts, it could be construed as influencing witnesses or even subornation of perjury. Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, allegedly confessed to false statements and suggested the statements were made with Trump’s knowledge.

Other potential criminal acts relate to the withholding of documents or acts that could constitute contempt of Congress. Of course, this strategy will fail if President Trump maintains simple restraint and leaves congressional and special counsel investigations to his own legal counsel. Congressional demands often raise separation-of-powers issues that can lead to litigation and delay. While Congress may not like it, it is very difficult to convert such constitutional objections into obstruction.

That, however, depends on the proper assertion of privileges. If the president interjects himself into the mix, the rationale — and the defense — can be compromised or lost. The scope and subject matter of these inquiries make for an obvious trap for Trump. This is why an aphorism like “you can’t impeach somebody that’s doing a great job” can be dangerous. Even if true to some degree on a political level, it also is true that a president can do a “great job” of getting himself impeached — if he walks into the world’s most obvious impeachment trap.

Jonathan Turley is the Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law at George Washington University. He testified on the impeachment standard for Bill Clinton and served as the lead defense counsel in the last impeachment trial in the United States Senate. Follow him on Twitter @JonathanTurley.

Axios

Published  3 months ago

"I sort of like acting. It gives me more flexibility, do you understand that?"

The Weekly List

Published  3 months ago

Week 112

01/03 4:39 pm

This week, for the first time since he took office, Trump faced a check on his power as the 116th Congress was sworn in. As House Speaker Nancy Pelosi took back the gavel, she made clear she will take Trump on, telling the Times she considers herself Trump’s equal, and the “TODAY” show that Tr

The Atlantic

Published  3 months ago

The president's endorsement of the U.S.S.R.'s invasion of Afghanistan echoes a narrative promoted by Vladimir Putin.

Rantt

Published  3 months ago

As the government shutdown continues, President Trump reminded the American people that his incompetence isn't the only reason he's unfit for office.

Washington Examiner

Published  3 months ago

Two top Republican chairmen stressed Friday that the final report from special counsel Robert Mueller "must be trusted by Americans."

In closing out their joint committee investigation into decisions made by the Justice Department, Oversight Chairman Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., and Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., took a shot at their Democratic counterparts for playing up concerns that their probe was a campaign to undermine Mueller.

"Contrary to Democrat and media claims, there has been no effort to discredit the work of the Special Counsel," Gowdy and Goodlatte wrote in a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, and the DOJ inspector general. "Quite the opposite, whatever product is produced by the Special Counsel must be trusted by Americans and that requires asking tough but fair questions about investigative techniques both employed and not employed.”

The two retiring Republicans said their committees "have assiduously avoided interfering with any ongoing criminal, counter-intelligence, administrative, or judicial reviews of conduct engaged in 2016 or 2017."

The joint endeavor began in October 2017, looking into decisions made by the DOJ related to FBI's investigation into Hillary Clinton's email server, inquiry into Russian interference and possible collusion by the Trump campaign, and alleged surveillance abuse and bias by federal agents.

While President Trump has dubbed Mueller's investigation a "witch hunt" and called it illegitimate, Democrats had accused Gowdy and Goodlatte's effort of being a partisan effort to hurt the special counsel.

"House Republicans have failed to substantiate their allegations of 'FISA abuse' at every turn. In some cases, those allegations have been made in direct coordination with the White House," Rep. Jerrold Nadler said in a statement in March. "These are blatant attempts to distract from and undermine the credibility of Special Counsel Mueller. Chairman Goodlatte and Chairman Gowdy are simply off base—just as they were last year, when they called for a new special counsel to investigate a slew of Hillary Clinton conspiracy theories. Where there is no crime, there is no criminal investigation for a second special counsel to manage.”

Nadler, D-N.Y., is poised to take over the Judiciary Committee when Democrats take control of the lower chamber next week and has joined the chorus of incoming leaders talking up the investigations they plan to focus on Trump, which they say the GOP has neglected.

While Gowdy and Goodlatte defended Mueller, they did criticize the Office of the Special Counsel for denying or delaying Congress access to information citing an "ongoing investigation" in their letter and mentioned one instance in which it retrieved documents that were in congressional possession claiming they were improperly disseminated.

Gowdy and Goodlatte's investigation is not likely to survive into the next term, and upon the conclusion of interviewing 19 "key" witnesses and reviewing thousands of pages of documents, they renewed their call for a second special counsel -- following the appointment of John Huber to investigate claims of FBI misconduct and an ongoing DOJ inspector general review.

Gowdy and Goodlatte also lamented the "institutional protectionism" at the DOJ and FBI, specifically regarding the issue of providing witnesses and documents in a timely manner.

"[C]onfidence in venerable institutions like the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation must be restored so the public can trust these institutions to make decisions solely on the facts and the law and totally devoid of political bias or consideration," they wrote.

In a separate letter to Whitaker and FBI Director Christopher Wray, Goodlatte urged that interview transcripts be released following a declassification process.

Talking Points Memo

Published  3 months ago

AFP/Getty Images

Acting Attorney General and former hot tub salesman Matthew Whitaker claimed he earned “All-American” academic honors during his University of Iowa football days on his resume and on government applications, but there’s no record of it being true, the Wall Street Journal found.

Whitaker claimed to have achieved the status of “Academic All-American” while he was a tight end at the University of Iowa in the early 1990s. The College Sports Information Directors of America told the Journal it had no record of bestowing the honor, which requires a 3.3 GPA, on Whitaker.

Whitaker claimed to have been awarded the honor in a 2010 application for an Iowa judgeship and in a resume sent to the patent marketing firm that he twisted arms for. The FTC shut down that firm this year, calling it a “scam.”

A Justice Department spokeswoman told WSJ that Whitaker had relied on a 1993 media guide for University of Iowa football, which caused him to make the error. Whitaker’s last year playing college football was 1992.

www.theepochtimes.com

Published  3 months ago

Ever since former Attorney General Jeff Sessions voluntarily recused himself from having oversight of any of the 2016 ...

www.theepochtimes.com

Published  3 months ago

Ever since former Attorney General Jeff Sessions voluntarily recused himself from having oversight of any of the 2016 ...

The Political Curriculum

Published  4 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will not recuse himself from his oversight role of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the bogus Trump-Russia collusion allegations.

A source familiar with the matter told Fox News on Thursday that Whitaker met with Justice Department ethics officials this week, who told him he was not precluded from overseeing Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling and potential collusion with Trump campaign associates during the 2016 presidential election.

Democrats have been fighting tooth and nail to get Whitaker to recuse himself from overseeing the investigation because he had been publicly critical of Mueller’s probe in the past.

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said Whitaker as acting attorney general would create a “constitutional crisis.” He told CNN, “The appointment of Mr. Whitaker should concern every American. If he stays there, he will create a constitutional crisis by inhibiting Mueller or firing Mueller.”

In November, despite Democrats’ best efforts, even Robert Mueller acknowledged Whitaker’s appointment as acting attorney general would have no impact on his investigation.

Mueller’s top attorney, Michael Dreeben stated in a 17-page legal brief that Whitaker’s new role “neither alters the special counsel’s authority to represent the United States nor raises any jurisdictional issue.”

Dreeben continued, “The Special Counsel continues to exercise the same authority, and the jurisdiction of the district court and this Court is intact.”

Dan Bongino

Published  4 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will not recuse himself from his oversight role of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the bogus Trump-Russia collusion allegations.

Fox News reports:

A source familiar with the matter told Fox News on Thursday that Whitaker met with Justice Department ethics officials this week, who told him he was not precluded from overseeing Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling and potential collusion with Trump campaign associates during the 2016 presidential election.

Democrats have been fighting tooth and nail to get Whitaker to recuse himself from overseeing the investigation because he had been publicly critical of Mueller’s probe in the past.

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said Whitaker as acting attorney general would create a “constitutional crisis.” He told CNN, “The appointment of Mr. Whitaker should concern every American. If he stays there, he will create a constitutional crisis by inhibiting Mueller or firing Mueller.”

In November, despite Democrats’ best efforts, even Robert Mueller acknowledged Whitaker’s appointment as acting attorney general would have no impact on his investigation.

Mueller’s top attorney, Michael Dreeben stated in a 17-page legal brief that Whitaker’s new role “neither alters the special counsel’s authority to represent the United States nor raises any jurisdictional issue.”

Dreeben continued, “The Special Counsel continues to exercise the same authority, and the jurisdiction of the district court and this Court is intact.”

The Gateway Pundit

Published  4 months ago

Matthew Whitaker was appointed acting Attorney General in November after Jeff Sessions was fired in disgrace.

Whitaker immediately took over the Mueller investigation, bumping DAG Rod Rosenstein from the role and the Democrats went crazy calling for him to recuse himself.

Three Senate Judiciary Democrats then sued to block Matthew Whitaker from serving as Attorney General.

Senators Blumenthal, Whitehouse and Hirono sued to block Whitaker from “serving in any office within the federal government” because the Senate hasn’t consented.

On Wednesday Acting Attorney General Whitaker was cleared by ethics officials to take over the Mueller probe — he does NOT need to recuse himself.

FOX News reported:

Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker will not recuse himself from overseeing the Russia probe, despite mounting pressure from Democrats who cite his “hostility” toward Special Counsel Robert Mueller and his investigation.

A source familiar with the matter told Fox News on Thursday that Whitaker met with Justice Department ethics officials this week, who told him he was not precluded from overseeing Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling and potential collusion with Trump campaign associates during the 2016 presidential election.

Whitaker, who served as chief of staff to former Attorney General Jeff Sessions until Sessions was fired, has faced extreme pressure from Democrats to recuse himself to ensure that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein continues in that role.

Sessions recused himself from overseeing the probe due to his work on the Trump campaign in 2016, turning control to Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller on May 17, 2017.

The DOJ also plans to send a letter to lawmakers on the Hill later today explaining Whitaker’s stance on not recusing from the Mueller Russia investigation.

Colleague Jake Gibson rpts source says DOJ also plans to send a letter to lawmakers on the Hill later today explaining Whitaker's stance on not recusing from the Mueller Russia investigation.

— Chad Pergram (@ChadPergram) December 20, 2018

Fox News

Published  4 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker has been cleared by Justice Department ethics officials to oversee Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia collusion investigation, a source told Fox News. This is breaking news. Check back for u

Rantt

Published  4 months ago

The Trump administration is in a state of chaos as President Trump’s impulsive foreign policy decisions led the last Cabinet official with bipartisan support to jump ship.

1. President Trump announced today that Secretary of Defense General James Mattis will be retiring in February. This comes just one day after Trump’s sudden decision to withdraw troops from Syria and amid rumors that he might act to do the same in Afghanistan.

Whether or not this was the last straw for Mattis has not yet been confirmed. However, Mattis’ resignation letter leaves little to doubt about his feelings for his soon to be former boss. In it, he admonished Trump’s cynical traditionalism and affinity for authoritarianism by reaffirming the importance of strengthening traditional alliances in the face of Russian and Chinese aggression.

General Mattis is widely considered the most competent member of Trump’s cabinet, the foremost of the so-called “adults in the room.” Aside from a markedly staunch stance against Iran, Mattis presided over a steadfast and level-headed defense policy lauded by both sides of the aisle. His competent leadership will be missed.

2. The government is heading for yet another shutdown, as President Trump is making good on demands to veto a spending bill approved by Congress because it does not include money for his border wall. If a resolution is not reached by close of business Friday, there will be a partial shutdown, the third this year for the GOP, which controls the White House and both houses of Congress. This would set a modern US record for governing incompetence.

3. The economy is facing further bad news this week. The Dow fell 2% today after falling another 1.5% yesterday; other US markets are facing similar trends, as are foreign markets because of them. The latest bout of pessimism is due to two factors. One is the Federal Reserve, which has raised its benchmark interest rates while also downgrading its economic outlook for the new year. The other is the impending shutdown (see above.) Many businesses cheered Trump’s tax cuts earlier in his term. Now that the era of cheap money and borrowing is coming to an end, they will have to come to terms with it.

4. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker has reportedly disregarded the advice of ethics officials to recuse himself from overseeing Robert Mueller’s investigation. While Whitaker was not found to have a legal conflict requiring him to recuse, ethics officials noted there could be the appearance of one due to his previous comments on the matter, including his public musings on how best to kill the Mueller investigation. The former hot tub salesmen got to the post by steadfastly broadcasting opinions Trump wanted to hear. This, along with his disregard for ethics will earn him high marks in an administration defined by it.

5. Homeland Security boss Kirstjen Nielsen faced questions from the House Judiciary Committee today, and things did not go well for her, as Congressmen grilled her over her agency’s handling of immigrants in their custody. Nielsen’s most egregious moment came when she was unable to provide information about the number of people who have died in DHS custody (the most recent DHS figures are three years old.) The death of 7-year-old Jakelin Caal Maquin and other DHS atrocities have renewed anger over the Trump administration’s treatment of people at the country’s border, a fact that didn’t seem to bother Secretary Nielsen much. She was also unable to come up with the number of ports of entry on the US border (Nielsen thought there were 20 or 30, there are in fact 48), was unable to speak on research that contradicted her administration’s immigration policy, and generally struggled with the use of the English language. The administration’s immigration policy seems to be influenced more by the likes of Tucker Carlson than ideals such as human rights and proper governance.

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by: Jossif Ezekilov

Jossif Ezekilov is the Foreign Affairs Editor at Rantt Media. Born in Bulgaria and raised in DC, Jossif gave up a semi-promising career as a goat herder/rapper to pursue his dream of working for a better world. During a verbal altercation, Bill O’Reilly once told Mr. Ezekilov to go work for the progressives. So he did, and now only one of them works in the media business. At Rantt, Jossif focuses on making international news and foreign policy more accessible to the casually interested reader. He also writes on a variety of issues, including global health, international development, gender equality, civil rights, and US politics.

Daily Intelligencer

Published  4 months ago

Donald Trump’s new acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker ran for statewide office twice in Iowa, and lost badly both times. After the second defeat — he finished fourth in a 2014 GOP Senate primary — a group of conservative lawyers in Washington, D.C., approached with him with an idea. According to a GOP operative familiar with the discussion, the group recruited Whitaker into an effort to start a conservative counterpoint to Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. For years, CREW had bedeviled the right with its crusades for good governance and its annual list of the most corrupt members of Congress. The Republican legal world saw the outfit as little more than a partisan operation masquerading as a government-accountability project, and they wanted their own version.

Whitaker, a former United States Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa, took the job, dividing his time between Des Moines, where he was a partner in one of the leading Republican law firms in the state, and this new group, named Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust, in Washington. Its fundraising was mysterious — almost all of its money came from Donors Trust, an organization set up to shield conservative donors’ identities when they gave to a network of right-wing political organizations. Whitaker, according to tax documents, was paid more than $400,000 for his work for the group in 2016.

Whitaker was unknown to most political and media types in Washington, and so set about meeting journalists and trying to get the group’s work recognized. Prior to the presidential election, he promised the press corps tantalizing tidbits to come about Clinton’s nefarious doings.

But the group never earned much respect in political circles in Washington, D.C.

“It was one of the hackier things I ever saw,” said one GOP operative involved in some of the early efforts of the new group. “If you wanted to be treated seriously you have to do serious work. The whole thing just became a chop shop of fake ethics complaints.”

Although the group took on the occasional back-bench Republican, it mostly became a repository of ethics complaints lodged against Hillary Clinton, the Clinton Foundation, and her presidential campaign. The group wrote to Eric Holder urging him to investigate Sidney Blumenthal for violation the Federal Agents Registration Act since Clinton’s emails revealed that he would email her while she was overseas. Whitaker wrote to the president of Harvard University demanding the school release minutes and transcripts of a 1973 meeting in which Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland was alleged to have pushed for a campus-wide ROTC ban. “Failure to disclose would leave the American people with the inescapable conclusion that Garland has something to hide,” Whitaker. He regularly filed complaints with the Federal Election Commission or the Office of Government Ethics about Clinton, although the regulatory agencies never did much with the complaints.

Clinton campaign operatives though said that in the universe of right-wing opposition research firms, FACT was one that barely registered notice.

“There were a lot of groups out there that drew blood. It was bullshit, but they drew blood,” said one former Clinton aide. “All I mostly knew about these guys was that they were a couple of partisan hacks who considered themselves watchdogs.”

FACT landed what was probably its biggest hit when it submitted research to the FEC that detailed how Catalist, a progressive data and technology vendor founded by Clinton friend Harold Ickes was coordinating between outside groups in violation of federal law. The story received play in right-wing media, but the FEC took no action in the complaint.

On FACT’s website, news releases about the group’s initiatives often feature Whitaker’s headshot — a practice that has not been taken up by the group’s new head, Kendra Arnold, a Whitaker protégé.

If the group didn’t have much of an effect on Washington politics, it did however elevate Whitaker’s career. He used his perch to become a semi-regular on CNN, eventually becoming a paid contributor. On the network, his regular defense of Donald Trump and his castigation of the Mueller investigation caught the eye of the president, and last year Whitaker became the chief of staff of former attorney general Jeff Sessions, where according to the Times, he was regarded as the White House’s “eyes and ears” inside the Justice Department.

People in Iowa political circles say that it is not that surprising that Whitaker became a favorite of the president, that he had a politician’s glad-handing way of making people like him, and that he often wanted to talk about more than politics. But while many Democrats and some Republicans fear that he has been installed in the job just to protect Trump from Mueller, friends back home say they do not recognize the caricature that is being painted of him.

“We don’t know the Matt Whitaker that MSNBC is painting of him,” said Bill Gustoff, a former law partner of Whitaker’s who serves on the board of directors of FACT. “Matt is a man of very high integrity, and an excellent attorney. I have always known him to be fair.”

In the relatively small world of Iowa politics, Whitaker was something of a player, someone who presidential candidates would court in the process of building support for the Iowa caucuses. He wasn’t an early supporter of President Trump’s, but told people that he thought Trump would win.

“Once his Senate race was over, the next thing I knew was that Whitaker was a guy with a regular cable news presence,” said Craig Robinson, a close political observer in the Hawkeye State and the editor-in-chief of the Iowa Republican website. “You always notice when something like that happens to someone from Iowa. Usually they go up the ranks bit by bit and get there but sometimes you can’t explain it. It’s who you know, I guess.”

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Breitbart

Published  4 months ago

John Podhoretz wonders if the U.S. economy tanking will make Trump lose enough support in Congress that he would be removed from office.

American Greatness

Published  4 months ago

Post by @DownStreamPols.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  4 months ago

The Deep State is a lifestyle.

400 former DOJ officials signed a letter opposing the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as Attorney General.

Hundreds of Deep State officials cheered Jeff Sessions as a hero after he openly worked to remove Donald Trump as the duly elected president.

NEW: Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions exits the Department of Justice to applause by colleagues and staff after submitting his resignation at Pres. Trump's request. https://t.co/w7mQyKOA68 pic.twitter.com/FymHSnn4ux

— ABC News (@ABC) November 7, 2018

But there were not letters signed when Hillary and her close advisers were given a pass by the Deep State. There was no letter signed when the FBI was caught spying on the Trump campaign. There was no letter signed when the FBI was caught passing fraudulent evidence to the FISA Court.

Vox

Published  4 months ago

We now have details as to how the indicted former campaign manager worked with the president to undermine federal law enforcement.

threadreaderapp

Published  4 months ago

Thread by @paul_serran: "(1) A thread about U.S. Attorney John Huber, and the explosive prosecution effort he is heading, alongside DOJ IG Hoize" it is said to be the "biggest in history." (2) I'd like to begin with d […]" #QAnon #GreatAwakening #TheStorm

Breitbart

Published  4 months ago

The House Freedom Caucus issued a statement late Monday calling for funding for President Donald Trump’s planned border wall along the U.S. border with Mexico in the upcoming funding bill as the group’s chairman, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), remains a leading contender to become the next White House chief of staff.

“This is our last chance to address illegal immigration before Democrats take over the House,” the Freedom Caucus said as a bloc in a group statement. “Republicans in Congress must fulfill our promise to the American people by building President Trump’s wall, ending catch and release, and securing our borders.”

The group is calling for GOP leaders in Congress to include the full $5 billion that President Trump requested for wall money and for legislative fixes to “catch and release” asylum loopholes in the must-pass government funding legislation later this month.

The statement comes as Meadows, the Freedom Caucus chairman, is in consideration and a leading candidate to replace John Kelly–a retired four-star Marine general–as the next White House chief of staff. Over the weekend, President Trump confirmed that Kelly will be leaving the White House by the end of the year–and that he would be announcing his replacement soon.

When it came out that Nick Ayers, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff who was seen as a leading contender for the job, would not be ascending to helm the White House staff, reports surfaced that Trump is considering Meadows for the position.

Several House members, including Reps. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) and Andy Biggs (R-TX), have come out publicly in support of Trump selecting Meadows. Biggs said in a Monday evening statement:

Mark Meadows is a proven conservative leader in Congress. Under his watch, the House Freedom Caucus has become one of the most-influential caucuses in the House. He would make an exceptional Chief of Staff for President Donald Trump. President Trump has accomplished a lot in his first two years in office. However, House Democrats are looking to overturn his endeavors and sideline his administration. President Trump needs a fighter like Mark to wholeheartedly defend his policies of smaller government and economic prosperity. I appreciate serving with Representative Meadows in the House and hope I will have a chance to work with him in the administration in the near future.

In an interview on Breitbart News Sunday with Amanda House on SiriusXM 125 the Patriot Channel on Sunday evening, Gohmert endorsed Meadows for chief of staff as well.

“I think Mark would make an outstanding chief of staff,” Gohmert said.

“He’s got a great head on his shoulders and in fact, I talked to him about in July,” Gohmert added. “It remains to be seen which direction Trump will go, but other contenders for the chief of staff position reportedly include Citizens United president Dave Bossie–who served as deputy campaign manager for Trump in 2016–and U.S. trade representative Robert Lighthizer, as well as Blackstone lobbyist Wayne Berman. Acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker and Office of Management and Budget director Mick Mulvaney are also reportedly in the mix.”

The Atlantic

Published  4 months ago

In a Manhattan federal court on Thursday, President Donald Trump’s longtime personal lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about the timing of his negotiations to build a Trump Tower Moscow in 2016, and about how often he discussed the deal with Trump during the campaign. The guilty plea is the first Mueller has secured that is related directly to Trump’s business dealings—and may be just the tip of the iceberg in the ongoing investigation of business deals involving the Trump Organization and Russian financiers, inside and outside the Kremlin.

With Trump now at war with someone who for years was his most loyal lieutenant and fixer, Cohen’s court appearance underscored the peril he presents for the president, who is unsettled by dramatic Democratic gains in the midterms and facing the prospect of unending offshoot probes by newly emboldened Democratic committee chairmen.

The plea includes evidence, for the first time, that could show how Trump was compromised by Russia while Russian President Vladimir Putin was waging a direct attack on the 2016 election. The formal agreement also incentivizes Cohen, the former executive vice president of the Trump Organization and Trump’s right-hand man for more than a decade, to tell Mueller everything he knows—and sets Cohen up as a more credible witness should Mueller ask him to testify in the future. Significantly, the guilty plea was finalized after Trump submitted his written answers to Mueller, who reportedly asked Trump specifically about the Moscow deal. (Trump’s lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, said on Thursday that Trump’s written answers matched the story that Cohen had told Mueller.)

Cohen, moreover, has indicated that he has no loyalty to the president and does not want or expect a presidential pardon. He has also not been sharing information with the president’s legal team throughout the course of his cooperation with Mueller, as Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort has been. Whereas Manafort has kept one foot in the door of Trumpworld, Cohen severed his ties to the president months ago. “The real wild card for Trump is Cohen,” said a veteran Washington lawyer who requested anonymity because he represents a client involved in the Russia probe. “It’s obvious that Cohen knows more about Trump’s business activities over the last decade than just about anyone.”

Cohen admitted on Thursday that he lied to Congress about how often he and Trump had spoken about the Trump Tower deal in 2016, and acknowledged that he had tried to organize a trip for Trump to Russia in 2016 to scope out the potential project after Trump clinched the Republican nomination. He lied both to minimize Trump’s link to the Moscow project and to limit “the ongoing Russia investigations,” according to Mueller’s team. The criminal information filed by Mueller’s office on Thursday makes clear that Cohen contacted the Kremlin “asking for assistance in connection with the Moscow Project” in January 2016.

Dan Goldman, a former federal prosecutor in the Southern District of New York, where he focused on organized crime, said he believes that the plea agreement is “a prelude to forthcoming indictments and other investigative steps. Before using information from a cooperating witness, prosecutors generally like to ‘lock in’ the witness through a guilty plea,” Goldman said. “So I would expect more to come arising out of, at least in part, Michael Cohen’s cooperation.”

It isn’t just Trump who may be in legal danger now that Cohen is cooperating—it’s also his family members, who Cohen admitted to briefing on the Trump Tower Moscow deal in 2016. According to the criminal information, filed by Mueller on Thursday, Cohen discussed the Moscow deal with Trump’s family members “within” the Trump Organization. Donald Trump Jr., an executive vice president of the Trump Organization, told the Senate Judiciary Committee last year that he was only “peripherally aware” of the Moscow deal in 2016. It is not clear what he told the House Intelligence Committee, which has not yet released the transcripts of the closed-door interview. But Representative Adam Schiff, the committee’s incoming chairman, said in a statement that the Cohen plea “highlights concern over another issue—that we believe other witnesses were also untruthful before our committee.”

While the extent of Cohen’s communications about the project with Trump’s family members is not laid out in the court filings, he has undoubtedly described those interactions to Mueller. “This sends a message that if you have lied to Congress, or plan to do so in the future, the special counsel will charge you for those lies,” Goldman said. “And the case is not simply a he-said, he-said: Mueller brings documentary proof to every one of his charges and allegations.” Indeed, the criminal information that Mueller filed against Cohen included emails that directly contradicted Cohen’s written statement to Congress. Goldman added that if he were Donald Trump Jr., “I would be more worried today than I was yesterday.”

Cohen’s guilty plea is the first Mueller has secured related directly to Trump’s business dealings, potentially crossing the “red line” Trump set last year related to his sprawling organization. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, who replaced Jeff Sessions earlier this month, has also said that Trump’s businesses should be off limits to Mueller.

But Cohen has been cooperating with Mueller’s team since August, when he first proffered information, and has already sat for more than 70 hours of interviews since September. That could prove to be incredibly damaging for Trump—who insisted both during and after the election that he had no business ties to Russia—and it could contextualize Trump’s consistent and inexplicable praise for Putin along the campaign trail. “This shows motive: Trump’s desire to pursue a major deal in Russia,” Jens David Ohlin, the vice dean of Cornell Law School, told me. “It finally gives Mueller some direct evidence that Trump’s associates continued to pursue business opportunities in Russia during the campaign, which would explain why Trump was, and continues to be, so deferential to Russia in general and Putin in particular. The motive was financial.”

Cohen also appears to be in a position to corroborate a key portion of the Steele dossier—a collection of reports written by the former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele outlining Trump’s alleged ties to Russia. Trump has called the dossier a collection of lies that was financed by Democrats.

Steele’s sources in Russia claimed that “the Kremlin’s cultivation operation” of the candidate had included offers of “various lucrative real estate development deals in Russia.” While Trump had a “minimal investment profile in Russia,” the dossier continued, it was “not for want of trying. Trump’s previous efforts had included exploring the real estate sector in St. Petersburg as well as Moscow.”

A top priority for some Democrats on the House and Senate Intelligence Committees has been to determine whether the Russians ever sought financial leverage over Trump and his associates, or whether they hold any such leverage today. Schiff, speaking to reporters, said that the criminal information filed Thursday raised the issue of “whether the Russians possess financial leverage over the president of the United States.”

“We need to look into the credible allegations that the Russians may have been laundering money through the Trump Organization,” Schiff said. “That has been a constant concern of ours, but an issue the Republicans were unwilling to look into. That is something we expect to pursue.”

Cohen’s guilty plea could shed light on the Trump family’s longtime bank of choice: Deutsche Bank, which was the only bank willing to loan to Trump after he lost others money in a series of bankruptcies. The bank was fined in 2017 as part of a Russian money-laundering scheme that involved its Moscow, New York, and London branches, and its headquarters were raided on Thursday morning by police and tax investigators as part of an ongoing money-laundering investigation. The bank refused last year to hand over documents requested by five Democratic lawmakers related to its relationship with Trump, citing the confidentiality of nonpublic customer information, and the GOP refused to subpoena the records.

Trump said on Thursday that he was still free to pursue business deals while he was running for president. “There was a good chance that I wouldn’t have won, in which case I would have gotten back into the business, and why should I lose lots of opportunities?” he told reporters. But he never disclosed the deal publicly, and Cohen’s guilty plea clearly shows how he lied in the written statement to the House and Senate Intelligence Committees to conceal the Trump Organization’s ongoing involvement in the Moscow project from January through June 2016, with the campaign under way.

The project wasn’t revealed until August 2017, when The New York Times obtained emails between Cohen and the Russian American businessman Felix Sater, who appears to be “individual 2” in the court documents filed on Thursday. Sater, who began advising the Trump Organization in the early 2000s and scoped out deals for it in Russia between 2005 and 2006, boasted of his ties to Putin in emails to Cohen in November 2015 and told Cohen that he could get “all of Putins team to buy in” on the Moscow deal. “Our boy can become president of the USA and we can engineer it,” Sater wrote. “I will get Putin on this program and we will get Donald elected.”

Sater forwarded a letter of intent to Cohen, outlining the terms of a licensing agreement to purchase property to build a “Trump World Tower Moscow,” and Trump eventually signed it. Cohen was also in touch with an assistant to Putin’s right-hand man, Dmitry Peskov, according to the court filings, and was apparently invited to be Peskov’s guest at the St. Petersburg Forum in June 2016. Cohen told Sater he would attend, but backed out at the last minute—just days after senior members of the Trump campaign met with a Russian lawyer at Trump Tower on the promise of obtaining dirt on Hillary Clinton. Peskov himself, meanwhile, also appears to have been caught in a lie: While he acknowledged on Thursday that his office called Cohen in 2016 to discuss the Trump Tower Moscow project, he claimed last year that the Kremlin had never replied to Cohen’s overtures because “we do not react to such business topics.”

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.

Fox News

Published  4 months ago

President Trump confirms he will nominate former Attorney General William Barr to return to the post and State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert to be the next ambassador to the United Nations. This is a developing story. Check back for

WayneDupree.com

Published  4 months ago

I’ve been seeing a lot of Joe DiGenova in the media these days.

DiGenova joined Laura Ingraham on Friday night to discuss Special Counsel Robert Mueller and how the man doesn’t have any evidence against President Trump.

I expected Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker to demand some answers from Mueller by now. This thing has gone on for almost two years with no end in sight. We have a right to know what’s going on, what else Mueller feels needs to be done, and when this thing comes to an end.

I am still not clear on what Mueller’s marching orders were as Special Counsel. Was it narrowly tailored to investigate Trump or was it a broader scope to look at the election as a whole? If the latter, then he has come across enough material to lop off the top of the RAT party several layers deep. If he really is angry about being given such a crap sandwich, wouldn’t that be a wonderful was of registering his disgust! Imagine the fame that would come from shutting down a coup d’tat.

What we learned again is that there is no evidence of Russian collusion with the Trump campaign and certainly nothing with the president personally. We learned the Michael Cohen is a kind of, rather unscrupulous individual who sought to enrich himself through the campaign and did some pretty sleazy deals after the campaign. But again there is no suggestion whatsoever that the president did anything wrong, committed any crime or certainly had any contact with Russians.

If you find inaccurate information within this article, please use the contact form to alert us immediately.

NOTE: Facebook and Twitter are currently censoring conservative content. We hope they will reverse their policy and honor all voices shortly. Until then, please like our page on Facebook and PLEASE check the Wayne Dupree homepage for the latest stories.

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SARAH PALIN

Published  4 months ago

Conservatives who believe the Clinton email scandal was grossly mishandled by the Justice and State Departments are in good company as a federal judge recently echoed that same sentiment. In a new memo, Senior District Court

TheHill

Published  4 months ago

The Democrat poised to lead the House Judiciary Committee next year says he has no intention of continuing the GOP-led investigation into FBI and Justice Department decisionmaking during the 2016 election.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), who stepped outside of the ongoing closed-door interview with former FBI Director James Comey, told reporters Friday that he plans to end the probe come January.

"Yes, because it is a waste of time to start with," Nadler said in response to a question about whether he would end the probe. Nadler characterized the Republican investigation as a political sideshow that aims to distract from special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible ties between the Trump campaign and Russia.

"The entire purpose of this investigation is to be a diversion of the real investigation, which is Mueller. There is no evidence of bias at the FBI and this other nonsense they are talking about," he continued.

GOP lawmakers say they are seeking to unravel what they allege is evidence of political bias against President Trump by the top brass at the FBI and DOJ during the election.

Comey, the latest in a series of current and former FBI and DOJ witnesses Republicans wrangled to testify as part of the joint House Judiciary-Oversight investigation, has long been a target for his actions during the heated presidential race.

The former FBI chief and other top officials at the bureau came under heavy scrutiny earlier this year after a DOJ watchdog issued a scathing report about Comey and other officials' judgment during the heated presidential race in relation to the Clinton email investigation and the Russia probe.

GOP lawmakers are also seeking to interview former Attorney General Loretta Lynch before Democrats take hold of committee gavels, although the exact timing remains unclear, a committee aide told The Hill on Thursday.

Nadler also told reporters that, while he just learned about Trump's nomination of William Barr to serve as attorney general — a role Barr previously held under George H.W. Bush's administration — and while the confirmation process for Barr is still a ways off, he still has "lots of questions" for Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

"The real question now is Whitaker, [who] is still the acting attorney general," Nadler said.

The top Democrat pointed to critical remarks Whitaker made about Mueller's investigation before joining the DOJ, stating that he believes it is "unconstitutional" Whitaker could take the interim role without going through the Senate confirmation process.

Democrats have pushed for Whitaker, the top official overseeing Mueller's probe, to appear before Congress to testify about his remarks. And just last week, House Democrats announced that they have secured an interview with Whitaker for sometime in January.

Daily Wire

Published  4 months ago

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Democrats, increasingly worried that Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into whether the Donald Trump campaign colluded with Russian officials to influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election will reveal nothing, have started doing something they've long criticized President Trump for: lashing out at Mueller over his "limited" probe.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) kicked off a torrent of criticism on Sunday, according to the Washington Examiner, questioning whether "Mueller has adequately investigated President Trump’s financial dealings with a German bank," and suggesting that Mueller's investigation could be so woefully incomplete that the House has no choice but to resume investigating the president themselves.

“If the special counsel hasn’t subpoenaed Deutsche Bank, he can’t be doing much of a money laundering investigation,” Schiff said. “So that’s what concerns me, that that red line has been enforced, whether by the deputy attorney general or by some other party at the Justice Department. But that leaves the country exposed.”

Schiff is referring to an alleged incident that occured late last year, reported in The New York Times. The Times reported that President Trump was ready to fire Mueller, until he was reassured that the Special Counsel had not, in fact, subpoenaed the Trump Corporation's financial records from Deutch Bank.

The report was never substantiated and relied on anonymous sources within the Justice Department, but Schiff seems to believe the report is proof that Mueller caved to the president's demands, rendering his entire investigation incomplete.

Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) is already doing the work Schiff feels Mueller failed to do, and has sent an inquiry about Trump's finances to Deutch Bank.

It's clear Democrats, who were counting on Robert Mueller to provide the ammunition they'd need to impeach the President for "colluding" with the Russian government, are concerned the Mueller probe may not be as conclusive as once believed.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker told Congress two weeks ago that Mueller was close to wrapping up his probe, and the Senate Intelligence Committee told reporters including NBC News on Tuesday that after "two years and 200 interviews" they're close to wrapping up their own investigation, having found no concrete evidence that the Trump campaign knowingly colluded with the Russians to steal the 2016 presidential election.

The revelations have clearly caused the Democrats to dramatically shift position on Mueller. Just six months ago, the Democrats were spearheading efforts to shield Mueller from the president's criticisms and protect Mueller if the president decided to fire the Special Counsel, even going so far as to promise Mueller would find a job with the Democratic House Intelligence committee if he were summarily booted from the Justice Department.

Now, unusure that Mueller will provide the outcome they're looking for, Democrats are more than willing to pre-emptively discount the Special Counsel's report.

Fox News

Published  4 months ago

Following his confirmation last month, a representative for Attorney General William Barr on Monday said Barr would not be recusing himself from overseeing Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing Russia probe.

“Following General Barr’s confirmation, senior career ethics officials advised that General Barr should not recuse himself from the Special Counsel’s investigation,” Kerri Kupec, the Director of the Office of Public Affairs at the Department of Justice, told Fox News in a statement.

“Consistent with that advice, General Barr has decided not to recuse.”

However, a senior DOJ official tells Fox News that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is still the primary liaison for Mueller's Office. Barr is ultimately in charge, but Rosenstein is still the primary liaison between the DOJ and Special Counsel Mueller's office.

During his confirmation process, Barr was repeatedly questioned about his handling of the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Democrats and many Republicans have said they believe that Mueller’s final report should be fully released. Barr has said that he will be as transparent as possible under Justice Department regulations, noting that regulations call for the report to be confidential, requiring only that the report explains the decisions to pursue or to decline prosecutions.

“I don’t know what—at the end of the day, what will be releasable. I don’t know what Bob Mueller is writing,” Barr said at his hearing.

Barr was sworn in on Feb. 14 as President Trump’s next attorney general following his confirmation by the Senate earlier in the day, placing him in charge of a Justice Department whose past officials have come under sharp criticism from the president over the ongoing Russia investigation Barr will now oversee.

Several Democrats joined nearly all the Republicans in confirming Barr, 68, a longtime lawyer who served as attorney general from 1991 to 1993 under the late President George H.W. Bush. He was confirmed 54-45.

President Trump's former AG, Jeff Sessions, resigned at the president's request after the November midterms. Trump had publically and privately lambasted Sessions over his recusal from the Russia investigation. Sessions had recused himself amid revelations he spoke twice with Russia’s ambassador and didn’t disclose it to Congress.

Following his resignation, the president then named Matthew Whitaker, who was chief of staff to Sessions, acting attorney general. Whitaker left the DOJ on Saturday.

Fox News’ John Roberts, Alex Pappas and Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

New York Post

Published  4 months ago

Acting US Attorney General Matthew Whitaker botched an address to the FBI-NYPD Joint Terrorism Task Force in Manhattan Wednesday by wrongly claiming Chelsea bomber Ahmad Rahimi had two co-conspirators — including one in custody — when he actually acted alone.

“The defendant had two alleged co-conspirators overseas,” Whitaker told dozens of law enforcement officials at the task force’s headquarters.

“One of them attempted to buy a plane ticket to come to America to aid in the attacks. Now he’s getting a plane ride to America — because he’s being extradited.”

After receiving media inquiries, the Justice Department clarified that Whitaker’s prepared remarks originally included references to a defendant other than the Chelsea bomber, but those statements were removed from the speech after a sentencing was postponed.

The department did not identify the other case but said a reference to it “was inadvertently” left in the speech.

Rahimi, the Islamic terrorist and Afghan immigrant, was sentenced to multiple life terms behind bars in February for setting off a bomb that injured 31 people in Chelsea as part of a planned wave of attacks across New York and New Jersey.

Whitaker’s speech came during a two-day visit to New York.

He also visited the National 9/11 Memorial and Museum at the World Trade Center Wednesday morning and met with U.S. attorneys for the region Tuesday evening.

Fox News

Published  4 months ago

Conservative author Jerome Corsi on Monday filed a “criminal and ethics complaint” against Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team, accusing investigators of trying to bully him into giving “false testimony” against President Trump.

The complaint, which Corsi had threatened for days, is the latest escalation between Mueller’s team and its investigation targets.

The 78-page document, asserting the existence of a “slow-motion coup against the president,” was filed to a range of top law enforcement officials including Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz, D.C.’s U.S. Attorney Jessie Liu and the Bar Disciplinary Counsel.

“Dr. Corsi has been criminally threatened and coerced to tell a lie and call it the truth,” the complaint states.

Corsi, who wrote the anti-President Obama book "The Obama Nation" and is connected with political operative Roger Stone, has claimed for the past week that he was being improperly pressured by Mueller’s team to strike a plea deal which he now says he won’t sign.

According to Corsi’s complaint, they wanted him to demonstrate that he acted as a liaison between Stone and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on one side and the Trump campaign on the other, regarding the release of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee.

The complaint states that Mueller’s office is now “knowingly and deceitfully threatening to charge Dr. Corsi with an alleged false statement,” unless he gives them “false testimony” against Trump and others.

The purported threat of a false statement charge, according to the complaint, pertains to a July 2016 email from Stone asking him to “get to” Assange and get the pending emails.

Corsi’s complaint says he was unable to initially give “accurate” testimony on that point, until he could reload emails on his laptop. The complaint says he later amended his answers. In an interview last week with Fox News’ "Tucker Carlson Tonight", Corsi said Mueller’s team “was happy” with his answers until he couldn’t “give them what they wanted.”

Asked about Monday's complaint, Mueller spokesman Peter Carr said they would decline to comment.

Corsi, the onetime Washington bureau chief of the conspiracy-dabbling right-wing website Infowars, told host Tucker Carlson last week that he has had "no contact with Julian Assange whatsoever."

The complaint is the latest sign of turbulence between Mueller’s team and investigation targets and witnesses. The team recently accused ex-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort of breaching his plea deal by lying to investigators.

Meanwhile, the special counsel’s office stunned Washington with the revelation last week that it had struck a plea deal with former Trump personal attorney Michael Cohen, who is speaking to investigators about Trump’s real estate pursuits in Russia among other topics.

While Trump maintained his stance there is no collusion and blasted Mueller’s investigation in stark terms last week, the developments showed the probe focusing more closely on Trump himself.

Fox News’ Samuel Chamberlain and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Chicks On The Right — Young Conservatives

Published  4 months ago

It’s clear at this point after two years that this Mueller charade is going to come to close without proving any kind of collusion between the Russian government and the Trump team. At this point, Mueller looks like he’s just trying to make life miserable for as many Trump associates as possible using intimidation and perjury traps.

Conservative writer Jerome Corsi is tired of Mueller’s games to he’s taking matters into his own hands.

From Fox News:

Conservative author Jerome Corsi on Monday filed a “criminal and ethics complaint” against Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team, accusing investigators of trying to bully him into giving “false testimony” against President Trump.

The complaint, which Corsi had threatened for days, is the latest escalation between Mueller’s team and its investigation targets.

The 78-page document, asserting the existence of a “slow-motion coup against the president,” was filed to a range of top law enforcement officials including Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz, D.C.’s U.S. Attorney Jessie Liu and the Bar Disciplinary Counsel.

“Dr. Corsi has been criminally threatened and coerced to tell a lie and call it the truth,” the complaint states.

Corsi claims the Mueller team asked him to lie and commit witness tampering. That’s a big deal.

Mueller wouldn’t be messing around with Corsi and Roger Stone if there was a coordinated effort between the Trump campaign and Russia.

The Russian collusion narrative has completely fallen apart after millions of dollars wasted and several lives destroyed.

Conservative Tribune

Published  4 months ago

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake’s bid to pass legislation protecting special counsel Robert Mueller was blocked on Wednesday by Republican colleague Sen. Mike Lee of Utah.

Flake teamed up with fellow Judiciary Committee members, Democratic Sens. Chris Coons of Delaware and Cory Booker of New Jersey, in calling for unanimous consent for a floor vote on their legislation S.2644, the Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act, the Washington Examiner reported.

In a speech from the Senate floor on Wednesday, Flake argued that the legislation is necessary in light of President Donald Trump’s “demeaning” and “denigrating” behavior toward Mueller. The Arizonan cited Trump’s repeated tweets about a “phony witch hunt” staffed by “angry Democrats.”

Flake also pointed to the forced resignation of former Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the reassignment of oversight of the Mueller probe from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker as a cause for alarm.

Lee rose in opposition to the legislation, thereby blocking it from reaching a full vote.

The conservative stalwart argued the separation of powers doctrine established by the Constitution is applicable, meaning Congress should not try to usurp decisions clearly in the purview of the executive branch.

“Prosecutorial authority of the United States belongs in the Department of Justice. The Department of Justice answers to the President of the United States. It’s principal officers consistent of people appointed by the president serving at the pleasure of the president after being confirmed by the U.S. Senate,” Lee said.

He further contended that if Congress were to pass legislation shielding the special counsel from executive oversight, it would in effect be creating a “fourth branch of government.”

Earlier this month, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked Flake’s move to have his legislation receive a full vote.

“The president is not going to fire Bob Mueller, nor do I think he should, nor do I think he should not be allowed to finish,” McConnell told reporters on Tuesday, according to the Examiner.

He added, “We have a lot of things to do to finish up this year without taking votes on things that are completely irrelevant to outcomes.”

During a Wednesday appearance on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Coons claimed that McConnell is protecting Trump by blocking the legislation.

The senator expressed confidence S.2644 would receive 60 votes if it came to the floor, pointing out that it passed in the Senate Judiciary Committee by a vote of 14 to 7 in April.

“I think, frankly, at the end of the day, Leader McConnell has gotten reassurances from the president that he won’t act against Mueller, but those assurances are undermined every single day when President Trump both tweets untrue criticisms of Robert Mueller and his investigation and does other things that are unexpected or unconventional or unjustified,” Coons said.

In retaliation for his legislation not being considered on Wednesday, Flake joined with Democrats in voting against judicial nominee Thomas Farr to serve on the federal bench for the Eastern District of North Carolina, Fox News reported.

Vice President Mike Pence stepped in to break the 50-50 tie, successfully confirming Farr.

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Rantt

Published  4 months ago

President Trump is resorting to authoritarian tactics while Robert Mueller puts Paul Manafort in a bind and more evidence of collusion mounts.

POLITICO

Published  4 months ago

GOP unloads on Flake

11/28 7:00 pm

Senate Republicans are grumbling over Jeff Flake’s vow to oppose judicial nominees until he gets a vote to protect the Mueller probe.

NJ.com

Published  4 months ago

WASHINGTON -- Senate Republicans on Wednesday struck down a new effort by U.S. Sen. Cory Booker and others to make it harder for President Donald Trump to fire special counsel Robert Mueller.

Booker, D-N.J., joined U.S. Sens. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Chris Coons, D-Del., in seeking to advance legislation that would allow a special counsel to be fired only for good cause by a senior Justice Department official under reasons given in writing. The special counsel would have 10 days to appeal his dismissal to a federal judge.

"This is a proactive bill, aimed at ensuring now and in the future we have appropriate checks and balances in place to prevent a constitutional crisis," Booker said on the Senate floor.

U.S. Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, blocked the Senate from debating the measure, saying Congress, the legislative branch, did not have the power to put constraints on the Justice Department, which come under the purview of the executive branch.

He cited the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia in saying that protecting the special counsel would create a "de facto fourth branch of government, fundamentally undermining the separation of powers that is so core to our liberty."

Coons and Booker are the Democratic co-sponsors of the bipartisan measure, which passed the Republican-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee in April. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., blocked a similar effort to bring the bill to the Senate floor Nov 14.

Their concern was that Trump will take action to stymie Mueller's ongoing probe into whether the president's campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 election.

They and Flake all mentioned Trump's recent tweets criticizing the investigation, which the president has derided as a "witch hunt" even as Mueller has secured the indictments of at least 32 individuals, according to Vox.

While the disgusting Fake News is doing everything within their power not to report it that way, at least 3 major players are intimating that the Angry Mueller Gang of Dems is viciously telling witnesses to lie about facts & they will get relief. This is our Joseph McCarthy Era!

-- Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 28, 2018

The Mueller Witch Hunt is a total disgrace. They are looking at supposedly stolen Crooked Hillary Clinton Emails (even though they don't want to look at the DNC Server), but have no interest in the Emails that Hillary DELETED & acid washed AFTER getting a Congressional Subpoena!

-- Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 28, 2018

They also cited Trump's decision to force Attorney General Jeff Sessions to resign and appoint Matthew Whitaker to take over the Justice Department and the probe. Whitaker has been critical of the investigation.

"No one, not even the president of the United States, is above the law," Booker said. "We must act quickly to protect and secure this fundamental democratic ideal. This is a sobered, measured, bipartisan bill that will achieve those ends."

Jonathan D. Salant may be reached at jsalant@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JDSalant or on Facebook. Find NJ.com Politics on Facebook.

ConservativeHQ.com

Published  4 months ago

Come January, Flake is out-of-office and irrelevant, so as we see it, it is time for Mitch McConnell to remove Flake from the Senate Committee on the Judiciary and replace him with a sane member, Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas comes immediately to mind, who will advance the pending conservative judicial nominees to the Senate Floor for confirmation

mcclatchydc

Published  4 months ago

Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta is out of the running to be President Donald Trump’s attorney general following a Miami Herald report that he oversaw a sweetheart deal for a wealthy financier accused of raping teenage girls and running a sex-trafficking ring, according to two people close to the president.

The investigation, published Wednesday, was “not helpful” to Acosta, who was a federal prosecutor in Florida before coming to Washington, the two advisers said.

Acosta, though, was never under serious consideration to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions, whom Trump fired earlier this month. ‘It was never going to be him,” one said.

The investigation, which reported that Acosta, then U.S. attorney cut a secret deal to allow billionaire Jeffrey Epstein to serve only 13 months in a county jail, is “clearly something” that is being widely circulated among Trump aides, one of the people said. The agreement “essentially shut down an ongoing FBI probe” and granted immunity to “any potential co-conspirators.” according to the story.

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Acosta’s current job, which includes overseeing labor laws related to sex-trafficking, is not in jeopardy, several people told McClatchy.

Neither the White House, nor the Labor Department, would respond to repeated questions about the report.

Trump will likely pick an attorney general who he has a closer relationship with than Acosta. Those who have made the short list are Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, retiring Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, the two advisers said.

Bondi, who is finishing her second term, has long been mentioned as a possible administration appointee since Trump became president last year. She was a Trump surrogate during the 2016 presidential campaign and, more recently, a member of the president’s Opioid and Drug Abuse Commission.

Trump and Bondi recently met while the president was on vacation at his Mar-A-Lago resort in Palm Beach for Thanksgiving, according to the advisers..

“I’d consider Pam Bondi for anything,” Trump told reporters earlier this month. “I know her very well. In the meantime, she’s got a very good job. She’s doing a very good job. She’s always done a very good job. But at some form ... I’d love to have her in the administration.”

Christie, a longtime Trump ally who prosecuted the father of Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, recently spoke to Kushner at the White House. if Christie is to be chosen, Kushner must agree, the sources said.

Trump abruptly fired Sessions after criticizing him repeatedly for recusing himself from oversight of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether Trump aides colluded with Russia to interfere in the 2016 election.

Trump named Matthew Whitaker, who had been Sessions’ chief of staff at the Justice Department and served as U.S. attorney in Iowa, as acting attorney general. Democrats have been calling for Whitaker to recuse himself from Mueller’s investigation because he has been critical of it.

Trump is also considering Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, who has a closer relationship to the president than Acosta.

Several conservative lawyers are recommending Janice Rogers Brown, a retired circuit judge and former California Supreme Court justice who has spoken to the White House about the job, according to a third person familiar with the situation. Brown, who stepped down last year after serving a dozen years on the D.C. circuit court, where she served alongside now Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. does not have an existing relationship with Trump.

Anita Kumar: 202-383-6017, @anitakumar01

BARE NAKED ISLAM

Published  4 months ago

Perfectly named after the Prophet Mohammed who also killed many Jews, this Muslim named ‘Mohammed Mohammed’ was caught on video repeatedly trying to run over Orthodox Jewish men outside a synagogue.

The Hill (h/t TherezaB) Authorities are investigating the incident as a possible hate crime, CBS Los Angeles reported. Video from a security camera shows the driver apparently trying to hit two men dressed in clothing typically worn by Orthodox Jews on Shabbat.

Mohammed Mohammed, 32, was arrested in connection with the incident and was charged with assault with a deadly weapon. According to security footage obtained by CBSLA, the suspect was seen making a “hard-U-turn” during the event, while another tape shows the driver reversing his vehicle and attempting to strike group a second time.

The man reportedly insulted a group of Jewish people leaving the synagogue before he got into his vehicle and attempted to run them over, the Los Angeles Police Department told the local NBC affiliate.

The suspect’s car crashed into another vehicle. No one was injured during the incident, according to NBC Los Angeles. Mohammed, who was charged with assault with a deadly weapon with a vehicle, is reportedly being held on $55,000 bail.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said earlier this month that he is “particularly troubled by the increase in anti-Semitic hate crimes — which were already the most common religious hate crimes in the United States.”

(You can thank Obama’s immigration policies which dumped hundreds of thousands more Muslims into the U.S. During Obama’s reign, the Muslim population increased from 2.2 million to 3.2 million)

Fox News

Published  4 months ago

Newly released tax documents showing a plunge in Clinton Foundation donations after Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential election defeat have fueled long-standing Republican allegations of possible “pay-to-play” transactions at the organization, amid a Justice Department probe covering foundation issues. 

Dan Bongino

Published  4 months ago

Incoming chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) said the Democrats will bring Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker before Congress.

“We are going to bring Whitaker before the Congress, assuming he’s still in his position at the time when Democrats take over,” he told CNN’s Dana Bash on Sunday.

Schiff said he was concerned that Whitaker wasn’t being transparent with lawmakers. “Fact of the matter is that he’s not telegraphing what he’s doing,” he said. “He’s not telling us or anyone, at least in Congress.”

Whitaker has been in Democrat crosshairs ever since his appointment, mainly due to his prior public criticisms of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into the Trump campaign and its alleged ties to Russia.

Despite Mueller’s recent statement that Whitaker’s appointment, “neither alters the special counsel’s authority to represent the United States nor raises any jurisdictional issue,” Schiff isn’t convinced.

“I don’t know… whether he will allow Mueller to subpoena the president or whether he will allow Mueller to look into this issue or giving Mueller a time when he needs to wrap up his investigation,” said Schiff.

Mueller’s statement about Whitaker was part of a 17-page legal brief by one of his top attorneys, and also stated, “The Special Counsel continues to exercise the same authority, and the jurisdiction of the district court and this Court is intact.”

CNN’s Dana Bash: “Have you actually seen him (acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker) take any concrete steps to impede” the Mueller investigation?

Rep. Adam Schiff: “We simply don't know, but I'll tell you this Dana, we're going to find out” #CNNSOTU pic.twitter.com/ChVF2FLjWo

— CNN Politics (@CNNPolitics) November 25, 2018

American Greatness

Published  4 months ago

Just hours after Jeff Sessions resigned as attorney general last Wednesday at the president’s behest, #TheResistance found its newest target for destruction: Sessions’ interim replacement, Matthew Whitaker.

Negative coverage about the acting attorney general has dominated national publications and cable news outlets. Reporters have portrayed Whitaker as a Trump lackey, a crackpot, and an “attack dog”; Democratic leaders are demanding that he recuse himself from overseeing Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation; on Tuesday, incoming House Intelligence Committee chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) warned that if Whitaker fails to step aside from the probe, “his actions will be exposed.” (Of course, this is pure propaganda. As Andrew McCarthy explains, Whitaker is well-qualified and meets the legal requirements for an interim presidential cabinet appointment.)

NeverTrump “conservatives” are aiding Schiff and the media in their campaign to paralyze if not remove Whitaker. Commercials attacking the acting attorney general were aired on several Sunday morning political shows. The ads were sponsored by “Republicans for the Rule of Law,” a group founded earlier this year by Bill Kristol, the editor-at-large of The Weekly Standard. The group’s primary role so far appears to be pimping for the Mueller probe, a political witch-hunt that Kristol and his fellow NeverTrumpers pray will lead to the impeachment and removal of the president. The Left and their NeverTrump footsoldiers fear Whitaker will thwart the special counsel’s investigation instead of rubber stamping Mueller’s ever-expanding investigation as Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has done over the past 18 months.

Buying primo air time on network television doesn’t come cheap. So who is funding “Republicans for the Rule of Law” and their attacks on the Republican president and his acting attorney general? Is it big Republican donors?

We haven’t found any, but we have learned learned that one of Kristol’s benefactors is progressive billionaire Pierre Omidyar, the co-founder of eBay.

In addition to funding dissident ex-conservatives, Omidyar, 51, and his wife—who have pledged to give their more than $10 billion fortune to charity—operate an extensive network of nonprofits and foundations around the world. Omidyar has directed millions of dollars to a variety of progressive causes and political candidates: he and wife “have have given more than $500,000 to federal candidates and groups—nearly all of them Democrats—since 1999,” including six-figure donations to the Democratic senate and congressional campaign committees.

The Omidyars have also been among the most prolific supporters of left-wing causes for years. According to a 2014 report by the Media Research Center, “Michael Bloomberg, Warren Buffett, Pierre Omidyar, Tom Steyer and George Soros’s son, Jonathan are major funders of the left. Together, they have contributed at least $2.7 billion since 2000 to groups pushing abortion, gun control, climate change alarmism and liberal candidates.” And lately, Omidyar seems to have become a big fan of Kristol’s, probably because of their mutual hatred of Donald Trump. Digging a little deeper it looks like they may have more in common since Kristol has recently found his “inner socialist” and he now opposes Republican candidates.

One of Omidyar’s nonprofits is the Democracy Fund. In 2015, the Democracy Fund awarded nearly $9 million in grants, “many of which went to left-wing organizations.” One Democracy Fund recipient is currently in court fighting the results of the Georgia gubernatorial race, which was won by Republican Brian Kemp.

An affiliate of that fund disclosed on its website that it has given as least $600,000 to Kristol’s umbrella group, Defending Democracy Together, since May. (Other NeverTrumpers involved in the group are author Mona Charen, strategist Linda Chavez, and former governor Christine Todd Whitman.) Republicans for the Rule of Law operates under the purview of Defending Democracy Together.

So why is a group of so-called principled “conservatives” accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars from a leftist billionaire who has shown zero dedication to conservative causes, an activist who finances interests that are inimical to conservative values and policies, and who bankrolls Democratic candidates hostile to mainstream conservatives?

Because the same phonies who claims to be all about principles and integrity are now the folks willing to do almost anything to take down Trump. (Remember that the next time they lecture pro-Trump Republicans about being a cult.)

Omidyar is a virulent Trump foe; he donated $250,000 to the NeverTrump PAC in 2016. Calling Trump a “dangerous authoritarian demagogue” during the presidential primaries, the Iranian-born entrepreneur proclaimed that “endorsing Donald Trump immediately disqualifies you from any position of public trust.” His Twitter timeline—much like Kristol’s—is an ongoing diatribe against the president and his allies. He recently has claimed the president is suffering from a “failing mental capacity” and called him “corrupt and incapacitated.”

Omidyar also is tied to another billionaire archenemy of the president: George Soros. Omidyar has donated millions to Soros’s pet projects, including the Open Society Foundations, a main funder of Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, and the Center for American Progress.

Among the goals of the Open Society Foundations are “creating a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants, cutting the number of prison inmates by 50%, enacting comprehensive immigration reform, increasing welfare handouts, and raising taxes to redistribute wealth.” (The Standard has other ties to Soros-linked projects and seems to be running a lot of cover for the global financier of late. More on that in an upcoming piece.)

It’s one thing for a political pundit like Kristol to brand himself as a Trump-hating “conservative” to earn hits on cable news shows and get fawning coverage in elite media publications. It’s quite another to partner up with the sworn enemies of the very principles one has claimed not only to champion, but of which he has insisted he is the last, best defender.

His new friend is a foe of these causes and has been for decades, which makes it appear as though Kristol is ready to sell out to any deep pocket just to damage the president while hiding the fact that his crusade is financed, at least in part, by a major anti-Trump, anti-conservative left-wing billionaire. (There is no information posted on Republicans for the Rule of Law’s website, or Kristol’s umbrella group, that discloses their funding sources.) The irony is rich indeed that “Republicans for the Rule of Law” is financed by a Democrat.

At what point do others stand up and not just deny Kristol his “conservative” cred, but acknowledge that he is now on the other side? When you join the battlefield alongside partisan hacks like Adam Schiff and take payoffs from leftist billionaires to do their political dirty work, there is nothing Republican or conservative, or frankly, decent, about you.

Content created by the Center for American Greatness, Inc. is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a significant audience. For licensing opportunities for our original content, please contact licensing@centerforamericangreatness.com.

Photo Credit: Joshua Blanchard/Getty Images for Politicon

Judicial Watch

Published  4 months ago

Calls Maryland Attorney General’s Request for Federal Judicial Action to Enjoin Whitaker’s Appointment ‘Naked Attempt to Wage Political Battle in the Courts’

State of Maryland v. United States of America, et al. (No. 1:18-cv-02849)).

Less than a week after President Trump on November 7 appointed Matthew Whitaker, then-chief of staff to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, as acting attorney general, Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, on behalf of the State of Maryland, filed a motion, asking the court to prohibit the administrative substitution of Whitaker to replace former Attorney General Jeff Sessions as one of nine defendants in a pending lawsuit.

Judicial Watch argues that the “State of Maryland’s naked attempt to wage a political battle in the courts should be denied” and its motion both misstates the law and is fatally flawed on procedural grounds.

Judicial Watch argues that the appointment is valid, as acts performed by a person acting under the color of official title are valid “even though it is later discovered that the legality of that person’s appointment or election to office is deficient.” Judicial Watch contends that “Supreme Court precedent suggests the de facto officer doctrine would apply” and precludes issuance of an injunction in this case.

According to the Judicial Watch brief, the doctrine “springs from the fear of chaos that would result from multiple and repetitious suits challenging every action taken by every official whose claim to office could be open to question and seeks to protect the public by insuring the orderly functioning of the government despite technical defects in title to office.”

Judicial Watch also argues that the Maryland attorney general misstates the law in claiming that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein should assume the top position of attorney general. In attempting to support his claim that Trump’s appointment of Whitaker violates the Attorney General Succession Act, Frosh contends:

Congress … adopted the Attorney General Succession Act to specify the acting head of that office [attorney general] in particular. Without exception, the statutes have required that the Department of Justice’s second-in-command serve as Acting Attorney General, never allowing the President to override that rule. [Emphasis added]

The Judicial Watch brief responds in rebuttal:

Contrary to the State of Maryland’s assertion, the Attorney General Succession Act in no way mandates that the Deputy Attorney General becomes the Acting Attorney General. The statute says “may….” To the extent the Vacancies Reform Act is constitutional – and the State of Maryland does not argue otherwise – the Attorney General Succession Act does not prohibit the VRA’s [Federal Vacancies Reform Act] application in this case.

According to Judicial Watch, the State of Maryland’s motion for an injunction also fails procedurally because its lawsuit is against Attorney General Sessions, in his official capacity as attorney general, an office he no longer holds. Judicial Watch argues:

[The lawsuit] is not against him in his personal capacity. There is nothing for the Court to do. Substitution is automatic.

Frosh revealed his political and ideological motives in filing the suit when he said, “[T]his guy, Mr. Whitaker, has extreme views and that’s dangerous in itself.” A coalition of attorneys general from 14 states and Washington, D.C. also have weighed in by filing an amici curiae brief supporting the State of Maryland. D.C. Attorney General Karl A. Racine, who is leading the coalition of amici called Trump’s appointment of Whitaker “illegal, unconstitutional, and runs counter to the rule of law.”

Pointing to numerous partisan legal challenges and separate moves by Maryland’s own lawyer to litigate a similar case before the Supreme Court, Judicial Watch also filed a Public Information Act request with the Maryland Attorney General about its efforts to challenge the Whitaker appointment.

“Anti-Trump politicians shouldn’t be allowed to abuse the courts to achieve their political goals,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “The court should deny Maryland’s naked attempt to wage a political battle in the courts.”

The Gateway Pundit

Published  4 months ago

Liberal “watchdog” group American Oversight submitted a complaint to the Office of Special Counsel this week accusing the acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker of possible Hatch Act violations.

The head of American Oversight is a former attorney in the Obama adminstration.

This is the latest hit on Matt Whitaker.

Democrats are in a panic that Whitaker may expose their corruption and criminal actions during the Obama administration and the first two years of the Trump White House.

Via Special Report:

An independent federal investigative agency is looking into whether acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker violated prohibitions on political activities by federal employees by accepting contributions to his 2014 Senate campaign earlier this year.

Last January and February, when Whitaker served as chief of staff at the Department of Justice, four individuals donated a total of $8,800 to the committee for Whitaker’s unsuccessful 2014 run for a Senate seat in Iowa, according to Federal Election Commission records.

Austin Evers, the executive director of the watchdog organization American Oversight, told CNN his group submitted a complaint to the Office of Special Counsel that argued Whitaker may have violated the Hatch Act, which prohibits federal employees from accepting political contributions.

A spokesperson for the Office of Special Counsel confirmed receipt of the complaint and said a case file on the matter has been opened.

Rantt

Published  4 months ago

It's been months since Madeleine Albright's warning about President Trump's authoritarian tendencies and needless to say, she was right.

The Daily Beast

Published  4 months ago

As critics condemn reports that Trump wanted to ask the DOJ to prosecute his political enemies, his right-leaning allies see nothing wrong with the president’s intentions.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Oregon “attorney general” Ellen Rosenblum has filed a lawsuit in federal court against the Trump administration because federal funding for law enforcement is being withheld due to Oregon’s “sanctuary state” status for illegal aliens. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports: Oregon sued the Trump administration Friday over a requirement the state work with immigration authorities if it […]

USA TODAY

Published  5 months ago

Special counsel Robert Mueller on Wednesday urged a judge to deny a request from a former Trump campaign adviser to delay the commencement of his jail sentence, which is scheduled to begin Monday.

George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty last year to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts while working for the Trump campaign in 2016. In September, he was sentenced to two weeks in jail, a year of supervised release, 200 hours of community service and a $9,500 fine. His sentence was scheduled to begin Nov. 26.

Papdopoulos is the first former Trump aide to be sentenced in Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Papadopoulos' lawyers filed a motion on Friday asking a judge to allow their client to stay out of jail until a ruling is handed down in another case, which is challenging the constitutionality of Mueller's appointment as special counsel. They said for Papadopoulos to "serve a sentence for a conviction that may be void, would be unjust."

Some of the arguments made in the case arguing Mueller's appointment was unconstitutional echo those made challenging President Donald Trump's selection of acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker. They say the process that gave Mueller his authority violated the Appointments Clause of the Constitution and that his powers make him a "principal officer" requiring Senate confirmation.

Mueller's team argued Papadopoulos has no appeal pending and that the deadline to file one expired on Sept. 25. They also said his lawyers' point about waiting on the case challenging Mueller's appointment didn't wash because a court issued an opinion on the matter in August. They said his "newly raised argument has long been available to him."

Since pleading guilty, Papadopoulos has said on television and on social media that he was "framed" and that he never should have pleaded guilty. Mueller's team used those arguments against him, saying they show his most recent motions are just being made for the "purposes of delay."

Papadopoulos served as a foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign. Although the president has tried to diminish Papadopoulos' role, he touted him as a member of his foreign policy team in a March 2016 meeting with The Washington Post editorial board.

Mueller's team said Papadopoulos "lied to the FBI regarding his interactions with a foreign professor whom he understood to have significant ties to the Russian government, as well as a female Russian national."

Papadopoulos told the FBI his meetings with them were "inconsequential" and occurred before he started working on the campaign.

"In truth and fact, the defendant knew that the professor took an interest in him only after the professor learned the defendant was affiliated with the Trump Campaign, and in late April 2016 after returning from a trip to Moscow, the professor told the defendant that Russia possessed 'dirt' on Clinton in the form of 'thousands of emails,' " the court filing says.

Contributing: Brad Heath

Neon Revolt

Published  5 months ago

If you’ve been following me on Gab, you’ll know I have been working on a very large article for the past two days. This is not that article. #QAnon, as you’re already doubtlessly …

I Love My Freedom

Published  5 months ago

It may be the beginning of the holiday season but anti-Trump celebrities are already mired in unhappiness as they continue to stew over the results of the 2016 election and despite the Democrats’ retaking of the house, exist in a state of misery.

The latest to pop off via his Twitter account is legendary writer Stephen King who on Tuesday, once again called for the president’s impeachment.

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This time it’s over Ivanka’s email use and a hissy fit over murdered Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi who the left wants to avenge at any cost even if it means crashing the world’s economy but hey, they are warmongering fascists now and damn proud of it.

He also decried interim AG Matthew Whitaker as a “crook” in his outburst.

Trump condones murder, then explains it's okay for his daughter to do what he wanted Hillary Clinton locked up for. Oh, and his AG is a fucking crook. Impeach.

— Stephen King (@StephenKing) November 21, 2018

Via Fox News, “Stephen King calls for Trump’s impeachment, criticizes Ivanka on Twitter”:

Author Stephen King continued his criticism of President Trump and his administration on Tuesday, once again calling for his impeachment.

The 71-year-old writer of “It” and countless other horror books took to Twitter to sound off on some of the biggest headlines of the week that concern the president including the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, Ivanka Trump’s use of a personal email address and the appointment of a new attorney general.

“Trump condones murder, then explains it’s okay for his daughter to do what he wanted Hillary Clinton locked up for. Oh, and his AG is a f—ing crook. Impeach,” King wrote.

The first part of the tweet was likely a reference to the lengthy statement that Trump gave with regards to Saudi Arabia and how his administration is not moving forward with any kind of punishment over the death of Khashoggi.

The jab at the president’s daughter is a not-so-subtle reference to reports that Ivanka allegedly used a private email address to conduct government business, something similar to what Trump criticized Hillary Clinton for during the 2016 presidential election.

Finally, the jab at Trump’s newly-appointed attorney general in the wake of former AG Jeff Sessions stepping down. Trump has faced opposition from his critics for appointing Matthew Whitaker in Sessions’ place.

The state of Maine’s most famous resident outside of Senator Susan Collins has for decades cranked out scary product from his prolific and bizarre mental assembly line to hordes of devoted fans including “The Shining”, “The Stand” and “The Green Mile” among his dozens of books and compilations.

King has made gazillions off of his product which is often quickly snapped up and turned into movies and television shows. Some were enduring classics like the “Shawshank Redemption” and others were borderline crappy like “The Running Man” (which bore little resemblance to the very subversive book version) and he is an industry all his own.

If his unhinged tweet is any indication of his mood, Thanksgiving Day will turn the King mansion into a veritable house of horrors as the author continues to be haunted by Trump much like the protagonist in one of his best-selling works of fiction.

A good piece of advice for the author would be to refer back to “The Shawshank Redemption” and “Get busy living or get busy dying.”

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Democrat leader Chuck Schumer called on the Justice Department to investigate acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker’s communications with the Trump White House.

Schumer and Democrats are outraged that AWOL Jeff Sessions was given the boot and must believe President Trump does not have the right to pick his own Attorney General.

This is more nonsense from the Democrats, a party that continues to prove they have no ideas to help the American people.

ABC reported:

The Senate’s top Democrat asked the Justice Department’s watchdog on Tuesday to open an investigation into communications between acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and the White House.

Sen. Charles Schumer wants the Justice Department’s inspector general to look into Whitaker’s communications beginning in 2017, when Whitaker was appointed chief of staff to then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Whitaker was elevated to the top job after Sessions was ousted by President Donald Trump earlier this month.

In a letter to Inspector General Michael Horowitz, Schumer, D-N.Y., said he wants inspector general’s investigators to look into whether Whitaker had access to confidential grand jury information in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. Schumer also wants investigators to examine whether Whitaker shared any information with Trump or others in the administration.

U.S.

Published  5 months ago

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senator Chuck Grassley said on Friday he will relinquish his job as U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman next year, creating a coveted vacancy atop a panel that reviews judicial nominations and was among those examining Russia’s role in U.S. elections.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) speaks during a news conference to discuss the FBI background investigation into the assault allegations against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas/File Photo

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, a former skeptic toward President Donald Trump who in recent months has become one of his fiercest supporters, has publicly stated his interest in becoming Judiciary Committee chairman in the event of a vacancy.

Grassley, an Iowa Republican who turned 85 in September, said in a statement that in giving up the Judiciary Committee post he would instead seek to replace retiring Senator Orrin Hatch as chairman of the tax-writing Senate Finance Committee, a position Grassley held twice previously.

The Judiciary Committee’s role in reviewing judicial nominations has been in the spotlight at a time when Trump has nominated a succession of conservative judges in a bid to move the federal judiciary, including the Supreme Court, to the right. The Senate must confirm appointments to the Supreme Court and other federal judgeships.

The committee was the focus of attention this fall in contentious public hearings over Trump’s second Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, who denied an allegation that he sexually assaulted a university professor in the 1980s when both were teenagers. The Republican-led panel backed Kavanaugh despite fierce Democratic opposition, and the Senate voted to confirm the conservative federal appeals court judge to a lifetime position on the high court on Oct. 6.

Graham lashed out at Kavanaugh’s Democratic opponents during the tense hearings, accusing them of pursuing “the most unethical sham since I’ve been in politics.”

As head of the Finance Committee, Grassley said he would focus on additional tax cuts and tax fairness, U.S. exports and improving U.S. healthcare.

While the Senate Intelligence Committee has taken the lead in the chamber in looking into Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the Judiciary Committee has played a smaller role. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation has led to criminal charges against former Trump aides and a variety of Russian individuals and entities.

Graham on Thursday met with Matthew Whitaker, who Trump named as acting attorney general after ousting Jeff Sessions last week. Whitaker, who has assumed authority over the Mueller probe, told Graham he was comfortable with the ongoing investigation, the senator said.

Senate Republicans, who maintained control of the chamber in midterm congressional elections this month, will finalize the committee leadership posts when the next Congress convenes in January. Democrats won control of the House.

Dan Bongino

Published  5 months ago

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Three Senate Democrats have filed a lawsuit today calling the appointment of Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker illegal, according to Reuters.

Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) and Senator Mazie Hirono (D-HI), say President Trump violated the Constitution and denied the Senate the right to vote on Whitaker’s confirmation.

Blumenthal said in a statement, “President Trump is denying senators our constitutional obligation and opportunity to do our job: scrutinizing the nomination of our nation’s top law enforcement official. The reason is simple: Whitaker would never pass the advice and consent test. In selecting a so-called ‘constitutional nobody’ and thwarting every senator’s constitutional duty, Trump leaves us no choice but to seek recourse through the courts.”

Last week, the Department of Justice released a legal opinion stating that Whitaker could legally serve as acting attorney general, writing, “As all three branches of government have long recognized, the President may designate an acting official to perform the duties of a vacant principal office, including a Cabinet office, even when the acting official has not been confirmed by the Senate.”

Whitaker has come under fire from Democrats who claim his history of comments about Robert Mueller’s probe into President Trump and Russia are grounds for recusal from his oversight role in the investigation.

House Democrat leaders recently sent a letter to an ethics official at the Department of Justice, demanding Whitaker’s recusal, writing, “There are serious ethical considerations that require Mr. Whitaker’s immediate recusal from any involvement with the Special Counsel investigation of the Russian government’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election.”

Prior to his appointment as acting attorney general, Whitaker told radio host Andrew Wilkow that there was “no collusion” between Russia and Trump.

“The truth is there was no collusion with the Russians and the Trump campaign,” he said. “There was interference by the Russians into the election, but that was not collusion with the campaign. That’s where the left seems to be combining those two issues.”

Whitaker also appeared on CNN in 2017 and suggested that a new Attorney General could reduce Mueller’s budget and grind the investigation to a halt.

President Trump told Fox News yesterday that he “would not get involved” in Whitaker’s decisions as it relates to his oversight of the Mueller probe, and said he was confident that Whitaker was “going to do what’s right.”

Whitaker was appointed acting attorney general earlier this month, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions submitted his letter of resignation at President Trump’s request.

Rantt

Published  5 months ago

When it comes to Donald Trump's presidency, unhinged is an understatement.

Fox News

Published  5 months ago

Three Democratic senators on Monday filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging the constitutionality of President Trump’s appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general.

Trump appointed to Whitaker to lead the Justice Department after Attorney General Jeff Sessions was forced out of the role earlier this month.

The senators who filed the complaint in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia are Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal, Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and Hawaii Sen. Mazie Hirono. All three released fiery statements Monday.

“Installing Matthew Whitaker so flagrantly defies constitutional law that any viewer of School House Rock would recognize it. Americans prize a system of checks and balances, which President Trump’s dictatorial appointment betrays,” Blumenthal said.

"The stakes are too high to allow the president to install an unconfirmed lackey to lead the Department of Justice – a lackey whose stated purpose, apparently, is undermining a major investigation into the president,” Whitehouse said.

“Donald Trump cannot subvert the Constitution to protect himself and evade accountability,” Hirono said.

The senators argue that Whitaker’s appointment is in violation of the Constitution’s appointments clause. They ask the federal court to declare Whitaker’s appointment unconstitutional and block him from carrying out duties.

But the Justice Department maintains that the appointment is legal. DOJ spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said Monday it is “lawful” and comports with the with the Federal Vacancies Reform Act, the appointments clause of the U.S. Constitution, Supreme Court precedent, past Department of Justice opinions and past actions of Republican and Democratic presidents.

“There are over 160 instances in American history in which non-Senate confirmed persons performed, on a temporary basis, the duties of a Senate-confirmed position,” Kupec said. “To suggest otherwise is to ignore centuries of practice and precedent.”

Last week, the Justice Department Office of Legal Counsel issued an opinion supporting Whitaker’s appointment.

“This Office previously had advised that the President could designate a senior Department of Justice Official, such as Mr. Whitaker as Acting Attorney General,” the OLC said, noting that Whitaker has been serving at the Justice Department “at a sufficiently senior pay level for over a year.”

The Democratic senators are being represented by two non-profit law firms in the case: Protect Democracy and the Constitutional Accountability Center.

Fox News’ Jake Gibson, Brooke Singman, Paige Dukeman and Bill Mears contributed to this report.

Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

Sunday on ABC’s “This Week,” the probable incoming chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) said Democrats would challenge the appointment of acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

When asked if Democrats would challenge that appointment, Schiff replied, “Yes.”

He continued, “I think the appointment is unconstitutional.”

Schiff said, “Constitutionally it has to be subject to confirmation. I think they lose that case when it goes to the Supreme Court. It’s in conflict with a more specific statute and that is there is a Succession Statute for the Justice Department which makes the Justice Department different from other agencies.”

He continued, “So it’s a flawed appointment, but the biggest flaw from my point of view is that he was chosen for the purpose of interfering with the Mueller investigation.”

He added, “We’ll expose any involvement he has in it. He needs to know if he takes any action to curb what Mr. Mueller does, we’ll find out about it. We are going to expose it. I would call on my colleagues right now to avoid the Constitutional crisis. Take action now. Speak out against this appointment.”

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

On Monday, three Democrat Senators sued to block Matthew Whitaker from serving as Attorney General.

Senators Blumenthal, Whitehouse and Hirono sued to block Whitaker from “serving in any office within the federal government” because the Senate hasn’t consented.

Both President Trump and Whitaker are named as defendants.

Market Watch reported:

Three Democratic senators have filed a lawsuit challenging the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general. Sens. Richard Blumenthal, Sheldon Whitehouse and Mazie Hirono say in a filing with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia that the Senate hasn’t consented to Whitaker “serving in any office within the federal government, let alone the highest office at the DOJ.”

Matthew Whitaker was appointed as Acting Attorney General on November 7th after Jeff Sessions resigned at the request of President Trump.

The Democrats and Deep State have been targeting Whitaker because he now has control over the Mueller witch hunt.

Fox News legal analyst Gregg Jarrett says Whitaker’s appointment is completely legal.

JARRETT: Whitaker’s appointment is NOT unconstitutional or invalid. Under the Vacancies Reform Act, the President is authorized to designate as Acting A-G an officer or employee who has been at the DOJ for at least 90 days. Whitaker meets this legal standard.

Whitaker’s appointment is NOT unconstitutional or invalid. Under the Vacancies Reform Act, the President is authorized to designate as Acting A-G an officer or employee who has been at the DOJ for at least 90 days. Whitaker meets this legal standard.

— Gregg Jarrett (@GreggJarrett) November 9, 2018

This is a breaking story…please refresh page for updates.

Big League Politics

Published  5 months ago

With the election Overtime period in the Deep South coming to an end — and Republicans protecting their victories in Georgia and Florida — the details of the vote-finding madness are still coming to light. At least one investigation might already be taking shape. Florida officials have referred swamp state Democrats to federal prosecutors to look into evidence of an incorrect mail-in form.

If federal prosecutors accept the challenge, that would put the investigation of the Florida Democrats under the jurisdiction of acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker. The Florida Democratic Party, which nominated Andrew Gillum for governor, is now the subject of massive public scrutiny all over America.

After saying earlier in the week that the State officials were trying “divert attention” away from the Department of State, which is part of Gov. Rick Scott’s administration, the Democrats on Friday took a different approach: They lawyered up.

“Upon receiving notice of the allegations that the form was incorrect, FDP took immediate steps, including hiring an independent investigator to review the issues at hand,” attorney Mark Herron said in a statement provided by a party spokeswoman. “As soon as we know the results of the investigation we will advise you.”

Herron went to CNN to break the news Friday morning, one week after the vote-by-mail “cure affidavits” were sent to U.S. Attorneys Christopher P. Canova of the Northern District of Florida, Maria Chapa Lopez of the Middle District of Florida and Ariana Fajardo Orshan of the Southern District of Florida.

Information related to whose mail ballots were rejected is public information. It’s not uncommon for political parties or outside groups to use that information to reach out to voters who had a mail ballot rejected to encourage them to fix the issues. In most cases, the problem is because a voter did not sign the ballot.

To cure a mail-in ballot, voters needed to submit an affidavit on Nov. 5, the day before Election Day. But the altered version changed the date to Nov. 8, the deadline to cure issues with provisional ballots. It’s unclear if any voters availed themselves of the altered affidavit produced by party operatives.

Politico passage ends

There could be a lot of material in any investigation into Florida Democrats — besides just that one incorrect form. There were, after all, boxes of ballots turning up, including a box of blank ballots intercepted at the Fort Lauderdale airport, flagged by an Avis employee.

The Broward County teacher who allegedly found a container labelled “Provisional Ballots” after Election Day did not choose to tell the cops or federal law enforcement right away. Rather, she called up Andrew Gillum’s friend in the Florida state legislature.

Lakeisha Sorey, the teacher who found the “Provisional Ballots” box, called Andrew Gillum’s friend Shevrin Jones for assistance during the emergency. How convenient!

Here is Andrew Gillum praising Shevrin Jones in 2017, at the beginning of Gillum’s long-shot bid to become governor.

Here is Gillum with Shevrin Jones literally on Election Day:

The American Conservative

Published  5 months ago

Beyond the constitutionality of his appointment, his views on judicial review and religious litmus tests disqualify him.

The Federalist

Published  5 months ago

The installation of Matthew Whitaker as the acting attorney general has the recusal pundits barking like shelter dogs in the presence of a trespassing squirrel. In case you’re wondering how the recusal rules work, it’s simply a matter of whether it helps or hurts Trump.

Don’t believe me? See if you can detect a pattern. Since Whitaker might rein in the special counsel, he must be recused, they argue. Similarly, when it appeared former attorney general Jeff Sessions might help Trump, he acceded to demands he recuse himself. But Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is a proven thorn in the president’s side with an obvious conflict of interest, so no demands for recusal there.

Judge Rudy Contreras’s friendship with disgraced FBI agent Peter Strzok and lawyer Lisa Page at the same time he was reviewing Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act warrant applications from Strzok did not require recusal from considering the application. But the Trump appointee with authority to consider a search warrant of Trump’s lawyer’s private office was recused, leading to the raid to look for evidence that likely could have been obtained by subpoena.

The recusal pundits called for the recusal of newly confirmed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh because he might side with the president in future cases. Yet when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg calls Trump a “faker” and openly expresses dismay at the prospect of his presidency, she need not recuse. Don’t bother reading the underlying rules on conflict of interest, because there’s only one test that matters: Would the recusal help get Trump?

This Is Obviously a Partisan Witch Hunt

Forcing Whitaker to recuse himself from the Robert Mueller probe would “protect” it by restoring oversight responsibility to Rosenstein. This seems to be a bipartisan goal. Republicans have joined the Democrats and the media to knowingly caution against the imprudence of stopping the Mueller “investigation.” But before we start contemplating tortured recusal arguments, it’s worth asking, “What is Mueller supposed to be doing, anyway?”

Mueller is supposed to be investigating “any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump,” or at least that was his original appointment until Rosenstein issued a secret memo supplementing Mueller’s jurisdiction.

By now, everybody knows there is no evidence the Trump campaign colluded with the Russians to win the 2016 election. As I show below, even Trump-hating legacy media sources such as The New York Times have been forced to admit the key facts that support this conclusion. The Russia hoax started when the Hillary Clinton campaign hired Fusion GPS to counterweight her email investigation troubles.

Fusion GPS provided the “dirt” that Fusion GPS-connected Russian attorney Natalia Veselnitskyaya used as bait for the Trump Tower meeting with Donald Trump Jr. The George Papadopoulos meetings often cited by Trump-Russia collusion boosters appear more connected to U.S. government sting operations than to Russia. U.S. Department of Justice official Bruce Ohr, who is married to Fusion GPS subcontractor Nellie Ohr, unsuccessfully attempted to coerce Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska to say that Manafort was coordinating with Russia during the campaign. Deripaska refused, calling the assertion preposterous.

Mueller Delayed Until Democrats Retook the House

Zero percent of Mueller’s indictments and convictions fall within the mandate of investigating links between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. But the investigation did succeed in one important goal of its proponents: to delay and frustrate House oversight into the Justice Department and FBI’s interference in the 2016 elections until after the Democrats could retake the House. It’s not hard to see why the government officials who helped the Clinton campaign advance the Trump-Russia smear would want a new House.

It was these Republican-led House investigations that uncovered many of the critical revelations of the Clinton campaign using Fusion GPS and Perkins Coie to collude with elements inside our own government to interfere with the 2016 election. For example, we would not know that the Clinton campaign paid Fusion GPS to frame Trump for Russia collusion but for a House subpoena of Fusion GPS bank records. Likewise, it was investigators for the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence whose investigation originally broke that Nellie Ohr worked for Fusion GPS.

And it was during a House hearing when we learned that Bruce Ohr sponsored Fusion GPS research to the FBI. It was the House memo that revealed Rosenstein signed off on the FISA warrant application that heavily relied upon the Fusion GPS dirt to justify surveillance of Carter Page. Indeed, to the extent that we have an answer to the original mandate of the Mueller probe, we have the House, not Mueller, to thank.

More than half of Americans voting in the midterms think the Mueller probe is politically motivated. Only 40 percent of Americans think the investigation is justified. Let’s stop and think about this for a second. The Mueller probe is staffed with “hyper-partisan” Clinton allies and Trump haters. Second in command is Andrew Weissman, who appears to be reprising his central role in the unjust destruction of accounting firm Arthur Andersen LLP.

Mueller’s probe is a political prosecution, and everyone willing to be honest with the situation knows it. It has no moral basis for continuing even another hour. Where are the calls for their recusals?

Politicized Prosecution Is the End of True Justice

It’s extremely bad for a democracy to criminalize political differences. This is a favorite tool of dictatorships that pretend to be democracies but use the criminal justice system to neutralize their political opposition. For example, Russian President Vladimir Putin has repeatedly trumped up embezzlement and fraud charges against Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny to prevent him from participating in presidential elections.

Russia uses leaks and issues bogus international arrest warrants against critics of the Russian government. The assembly line of political prosecution appears to be the only thing that functions efficiently in the socialist paradise of Venezuela. To criticize or run for office against the ruling party in Egypt, Pakistan, China, Burma, Saudi Arabia, and many other such countries could put your legal well-being in jeopardy.

Unfortunately, prosecution of political opponents is becoming more common in America, as prosecutors seek to interfere with or reverse elections results in Missouri, Texas, Alaska, New York, and Virginia, to name a few high-profile examples. With the real control of the Mueller probe in the hands of leftist partisans, political prosecution might seem a tolerable evil to the left as it seeks to reverse the 2016 election. It’s not. It’s just evil. And it shouldn’t be tolerated by any on the left who still believe in democracy.

Even as the left makes lofty pronouncements about how the Mueller investigation protects constitutional principles, it does exactly the opposite by driving us ever closer to an America in which criminal prosecutions steer elections to the outcome desired by the real power brokers. The scary thing is that a majority of Americans can see this for what it is. Our leaders nevertheless lecture their subjects on the moral necessity for Mueller’s criminal probe to continue pursuit of its apparent real goal: to reverse a political outcome too important to be left to voters.

mcclatchydc

Published  5 months ago

President Donald Trump will meet with Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi — who is on his short list be his next attorney general — while he vacations at his Mar-A-Lago resort in Palm Beach for Thanksgiving next week, according to a source close to the president.

Bondi, Florida’s first female attorney general, is finishing her second term. She is not legally allowed to run again, and has been mentioned as a possible administration appointee since Trump became president last year.

Bondi was a Trump surrogate during the 2016 presidential campaign and, more recently, a member of the president’s Opioid and Drug Abuse Commission.

Three sources said Trump is seriously considering Bondi for the job. Bondi’s office did not immediately return a request for comment.

Trump is considering several other well-known officials for attorney general, including Janice Rogers Brown, a retired circuit judge and former California Supreme Court justice who has spoken to the White House about the job, according to a second source familiar with the search.

One name not on Trump’s list is Kris Kobach, Kansas secretary of state and architect of one of the nation’s toughest immigration laws, according to the two sources and another person close to the president.

The president had initially considered Kobach, who was defeated last week in his bid for governor, for various positions at the Department of Homeland Security but apparently has soured on him after his electoral loss.

Trump abruptly fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions last week after criticizing him repeatedly for recusing himself from oversight of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether Trump aides colluded with Russia to interfere in the 2016 election.

Trump named Matthew Whitaker, who had been Sessions’ chief of staff at the Justice Department and served as U.S. attorney in Iowa, as acting attorney general. Democrats have been calling for Whitaker to recuse himself from Mueller’s investigation because he has been critical of it.

Trump will likely pick someone he has had a relationship with, according to one of the sources. That list could include former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a longtime Trump ally who does not get along with Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, a top White House aide. As a U.S. attorney, Christie prosecuted Kushner’s father.

Christie said this week he has not been contacted about the job but he did speak to Kushner when he was at the White House for a meeting on prison reform, a source said.

Trump and Bondi have been in regular contact since the Nov. 6 election as Florida embarked on recounts in both the governor and Senate races. The president endorsed Republicans Ron DeSantis and Rick Scott in those two contests and was heavily involved in the governor’s race.

Bondi received a $25,000 campaign donation in 2013 from a charity run by Trump as her office was looking into complaints from customers of Trump University, which was the subject of a class action lawsuit in New York. Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee had requested the Justice Department to look into whether Trump paid off Bondi. She denied that the two actions were connected.

Trump, who spends much of the winter in Florida, is expected to spend several days at his Mar-A-Lago resort next week.

Several conservative lawyers are recommending Brown, who stepped down last year after serving a dozen years on the D.C. circuit court, where she served alongside now Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. She does not have an existing relationship with Trump.

Other names reportedly being mentioned for the permanent position include Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Transportation Department general counsel Steven Bradbury, former Attorney General Bill Barr and Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan. Of those, Trump only has a relationship with Azar.

Retiring Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-South Carolina, Sen. Lindsay Graham, R-South Carolina, and Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, have said they do not want the job.

Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

On Friday’s broadcast of HBO’s “Real Time,” Representative Eric Swalwell (D-CA) vowed that Democrats will do everything they can to get Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker to recuse himself due to the fact that Whitaker has “pre-judged” Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

Swalwell stated that Democrats should “project confidence, tell the American people, you elected us to stop this. We’re going to stop this.”

He continued, “And so, we’re going to protect Bob Mueller. We’re going to make sure that this hired assassin who was brought in to take out the Mueller investigation is not able to do it. And also, we’re going to do all we can to get him to recuse himself. Because he’s pre-judged the investigation, and he has been plotting for months with Donald Trump to do this.”

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Guest post by Joe Hoft

Americans are so tired of seeing their duly-elected President Trump crucified for a fake Russia collusion conspiracy while the real criminals in the Department of Justice, the FBI and the Democrat Party go untouched.

It’s past time for the Justice Department to finally “Drain the Swamp” and “Lock Her Up”!

Before the 2016 election, Americans across the country were demanding that candidate Donald Trump clean Washington of the corruption and criminal cancer that plagued the Obama Administration and their DC cronies.

At rally after rally Americans demanded that when elected, President Trump “Drain the Swamp”

Americans were just as eager to see the corrupt Hillary Clinton also be brought to justice. The entire country knew that the FBI and DOJ were corrupt and contaminated when Hillary was exonerated of all wrongdoing after lying many times then destroying evidence related to her off-site email server.

They screamed “Lock Her Up” and still do at President Trump’s rallies –

Now it’s time. Sleeping Jeff Sessions is gone. A new sheriff is in town. He is Acting AG Matthew Whitaker, a former Big Ten football tight end and scholar athlete.

Americans want justice and can wait no longer. There is more than enough evidence to indict Hillary Clinton for her email crimes.

The Uranium One sale and the donations to the Clinton Foundation must be looked into and indictments produced. How could Obama and his Secretary of State approve the sale of 20% of the country’s uranium to Russia and then receive millions in apparent kick backs? This is the real Russia scandal and all of America knows it.

The FBI and DOJ are corrupt. The Mueller investigation proves it. How could any criminal investigation into the President start with no crime, be allowed to look into anything, be run by a gang of conflicted Hillary supporters and continue based on a fake dossier lie? The FBI, DOJ and Mueller gang are an outrage to ordinary law abiding citizens in the US!

Americans are ready for justice and there are signs that justice may soon be coming. Hillary is being asked to answer questions on her email server. These were pressed by Judicial Watch and not the DOJ however:

30 days. Court orders Mrs. Clinton to respond in writing, under oath, to key questions about her email system within 30 days. @JudicialWatch is alone doing the heavy lifting on this major scandal….@RealDonaldTrump should ask why DOJ and State oppose us. https://t.co/w2jdO9ymFw

— Tom Fitton (@TomFitton) November 20, 2018

Others give us an indication that indictments are coming against the corrupt Obama team, including his corrupt former CIA Head:

Jimbo – you constantly remind us how you should be locked up for both your serial failures at CIA & for your part in setting up the coup against a sitting President known as the “Russian Narrative” – tic-toc @JohnBrennan – you will never need any ladders as you will be in prison https://t.co/K3VqpvHlFk

— Tony Shaffer (@T_S_P_O_O_K_Y) November 20, 2018

God and country loving Americans demand justice. It cannot come soon enough! Mr. President please make it so, for the sake of our union, make it so!

Sara A. Carter

Published  5 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker won’t fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller, according to Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.).

Graham met with Whitaker on Thursday afternoon and said the new acting attorney general doesn’t see anything wrong with Mueller’s investigation.

“As to the Mueller investigation, I’m confident that it is not in jeopardy,” Graham said after meeting with Whitaker.

Graham said that Whitaker assured him that he doesn’t think that Mueller’s probe has breached any Justice Department guidelines.

“There’s no reason to fire him. I asked him, ‘Do you have any reason to [fire] Mr. Mueller? He said he has zero reason to believe anything is being done wrong with the Mueller investigation,” Graham said, recounting the conversation.

Graham recently coauthored legislation protecting Special Counsel Mueller. The proposed legislation would allow any special counsel to challenge a termination in court after 10 days. Senators Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Corey Booker (D-NJ), and Chris Coons (D-Del.) also authored the bill.

Over the weekend, Sen. Graham appeared on CBS’s Face the Nation, where he defended the legality of Whitaker’s appointment as acting attorney general and said there was no need for him to recuse himself from his oversight responsibilities of the Mueller investigation.

dailycaller

Published  5 months ago

'We’re working on many things'

Homeland Security

Published  5 months ago

Conservatives have long wondered where noted NeverTrumper Bill Kristol, the editor-at-large of The Weekly Standard, was getting the funding for his multi-year crusade against President Trump. The mystery now appears to have been solved.

According to Julie Kelly of American Greatness, the sugar daddy funding much of Kristol's NeverTrumper activities is left-wing billionaire Pierre Omidyar, the co-founder of eBay.

NeverTrump “conservatives” like Kristol have lately united with the left in opposing Trump's appointment of Matthew Whitaker, former attorney general Jeff Sessions’ interim replacement. The Kristol-founded group “Republicans for the Rule of Law” sponsored ads attacking the acting attorney general on several Sunday morning political shows last weekend, Kelly reported.

The group’s primary role so far appears to be pimping for the Mueller probe, a political witch-hunt that Kristol and his fellow NeverTrumpers pray will lead to the impeachment and removal of the president. The Left and their NeverTrump footsoldiers fear Whitaker will thwart the special counsel’s investigation instead of rubber stamping Mueller’s ever-expanding investigation as Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has done over the past 18 months.

Incredibly, Kelly was unable to find any Republican donors to “Republicans for the Rule of Law,” but did discover that an affiliate of one of Omidyar’s nonprofits had given hundreds of thousands of dollars to Kristol’s NeverTrump group.

According to the report, Omidyar’s group Democracy Fund awarded nearly $9 million in grants in 2015, “many of which went to left-wing organizations.”

An affiliate of that fund disclosed on its website that it has given as least $600,000 to Kristol’s umbrella group, Defending Democracy Together, since May.

In a tweet linking to American Greatness Wednesday afternoon, Kristol did not deny Kelly's claim. Instead, he tacitly admitted it by lauding the "public spiritedness" of the left.

Grateful to all—left, right, and center—who are willing to step up to defend liberal democracy and the rule of law. Nothing would make me happier if such impressive examples of public-spiritedness on the left inspired more public-spiritedness on the right! https://t.co/kIHPULt2A9

— Bill Kristol (@BillKristol) November 14, 2018

According to Kelly, other NeverTrumpers involved in Republicans for the Rule of Law include National Review contributor Mona Charen, Republican strategist Linda Chavez, and former Republican governor Christine Todd Whitman. The group operates under the purview of Defending Democracy Together.

It will not come as a surprise that Omidyar has also bankrolled Evan McMullin's anti-Trump activities, as the Daily Caller reported late last year. What brought these alleged "conservatives" and the left-wing billionaire together was their mutual hatred of Donald Trump, apparently. But was that all?

Since 1999, Omidyar has reportedly given more than $500,000 to mostly Democrat candidates.

The Omidyars have also been among the most prolific supporters of left-wing causes for years. According to a 2014 report by the Media Research Center, “Michael Bloomberg, Warren Buffett, Pierre Omidyar, Tom Steyer and George Soros’s son, Jonathan are major funders of the left. Together, they have contributed at least $2.7 billion since 2000 to groups pushing abortion, gun control, climate change alarmism and liberal candidates.”

SARAH PALIN

Published  5 months ago

President Trump has renewed his criticisms of the ongoing investigation led by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

In a pair of tweets, the president called it a “total mess” and said it is a “witch hunt like no other in American history.”

“The inner workings of the Mueller investigation are a total mess,” Trump tweeted. “They have found no collusion and have gone absolutely nuts. They are screaming and shouting at people, horribly threatening them to come up with the answers they want.”

“They are a disgrace to our Nation and don’t care how many lives the ruin. These are Angry People, including the highly conflicted Bob Mueller, who worked for Obama for 8 years. They won’t even look at all of the bad acts and crimes on the other side. A TOTAL WITCH HUNT LIKE NO OTHER IN AMERICAN HISTORY!” he said.

Trump has routinely criticized the special counsel investigation but was mum on the issue leading up to the 2018 midterm elections. Instead, Trump used his social media platform to endorse political candidates and draw attention to a thousands-strong migrant caravan.

Here’s more, from Politico:

Trump’s broadsides against the Mueller investigation are some of the most direct in recent weeks, reviving past attacks against Mueller’s time as FBI director in the Obama administration, and calling for the investigation of unspecified “bad acts and crimes on the other side.”

Reuters on Tuesday reported that Trump and his legal team were finalizing the president’s answers to questions about Russian interference, and that he would not be responding to inquiries about whether or not he sought to obstruct the probe.

Whether Trump would respond to questions from the special counsel has been a point of negotiation for over a year, as Trump has insisted he wants to sit for an interview, a move his legal team has advised against out of fear that the president might perjure himself.

Trump’s criticism also comes after an effort in the Senate to advance a protection bill was objected to by Republican Leader Mitch McConnell. From the Hill:

A bill to protect the special counsel’s investigation into Russian election interference and possible collusion between Trump’s campaign and Moscow was blocked Wednesday by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who said earlier in the day that there was no threat to Mueller from the president.

Democrats, and some Republicans, called for the legislation to be passed in the wake of Trump ousting Attorney General Jeff Sessions last week and replacing him with acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, Sessions’s former chief of staff.

Note: The author of this article has included commentary that expresses an opinion and analysis of the facts.

Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

Lawyer George Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, is launching a group aimed at encouraging right-leaning attorneys to “speak out” against President Donald Trump.

“We believe in the rule of law, the power of truth, the independence of the criminal justice system, the imperative of individual rights and the necessity of civil discourse,” the mission statement of the recently formed group “Check and Balances” reads. “We believe these principles apply regardless of the party or persons in power.”

Over a dozen conservative attorneys, including former acting Attorney General Pete D. Keisler and ex-Gov. Tom Ridge (R-PA) are signees of the group’s founding document.

In an interview with the New York Times, Conway said he wants the group to act as a counter-balance to the Federalist Society, a group he says he has long respected but claims the “perception out there that conservative lawyers have essentially sold their souls for judges and regulatory reform.”

“We just want to be a voice speaking out, and to encourage others to speak out,” Conway told the Times.

According to Keisler, the group was created with the goal of stirring debate concerning President Trump’s agenda.

“It’s important that people from across the political spectrum speak out about the country’s commitment to the rule of law and the core values underlying it — that the criminal justice system should be nonpartisan and independent, that a free press and public criticism should be encouraged and not attacked,” Keisler, who worked under former President George W. Bush, said.

Conway, a frequent critic of the president, recently co-wrote a Times opinion-editorial in which he argued that appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting Attorney General is “unconstitutional” and “illegal.” President Trump dismissed the op-ed, saying Conway is “just trying to get publicity for himself.”

Fox News

Published  5 months ago

The Department of Justice Office of Legal Counsel issued an opinion Wednesday supporting President Trump's appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general. In the opening line of the opinion the OLC says Trump-appointed Whitaker under the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, and further reveals, "This Office previously had advised that the President could designate a senior Department of Justice Official, such as Mr. Whitaker, as Acting Attorney General... "This is a developing story. Check

CNS News

Published  5 months ago

(CNSNews.com) - As speculation mounts about what Robert Mueller and his investigators are up to -- almost two years into the Trump-Russia investigation -- President Trump is drawing his own conclusions.

In two tweets on Thursday, he wrote:

The inner workings of the Mueller investigation are a total mess. They have found no collusion and have gone absolutely nuts. They are screaming and shouting at people, horribly threatening them to come up with the answers they want. They are a disgrace to our Nation and don’t care how many lives the (sic) ruin. These are Angry People, including the highly conflicted Bob Mueller, who worked for Obama for 8 years. They won’t even look at all of the bad acts and crimes on the other side. A TOTAL WITCH HUNT LIKE NO OTHER IN AMERICAN HISTORY!

Trump's tirade comes as Democrats and some Republicans are trying to bring up legislation protecting the Mueller investigation from possible interference by Trump.

On Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said he doesn't think such legislation is necessary.

"I mean, there's been no indication -- as you can imagine, I've talked to the president fairly often -- no indication that the Mueller investigation will not be allowed to finish. And it should be allowed to finish.

"We know how the president feels about the Mueller investigation, but he's never said he wants to shut it down. I've never heard anybody down there say they want to shut it down. I think it's in no danger, and so I don't think any legislation's necessary."

Speaking to CNN on Thursday morning, incoming House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler said no one knows what the Mueller team is up to, except for court filings made by his team.

"I certainly worry that the Acting Attorney General Whitaker was put there for the express purpose to be a hatchet man to sabotage this investigation," Nadler said.

Democrats insist that Acting AG Matthew Whitaker should recuse himself from the Mueller investigation, as former Attorney General Jeff Sessions did, because he has publicly commented on it and thus "pre-judged" the outcome, critics say.

The Washington Times reported on Thursday that based on a new court filing yesterday, the Mueller probe could go on for several more months. "Prosecutors say they’re not ready for Trump campaign aide Rick Gates to be sentenced because he is continuing to cooperate with “several ongoing investigations.” And they’re asking a federal judge to give them until mid-January to offer another update about his case," the newspaper reported.

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Blunt Force Truth

Published  5 months ago

Federal prosecutors have reportedly been asked to step in and investigate some of the numerous claims of vote fraud in the Florida 2018 election, as the highly disputed Palm Beach County recount process drags on until at least November 20. Could acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker now step in?

Blank ballots recently turned up in a box at the Fort Lauderdale airport, according to Sheriff Scott Israel’s Broward County sheriff’s office, which shut down the airport in response to a suspicious package threat that turned out to not be a bomb.

Politico reported Wednesday: “The Florida Department of State last week asked federal prosecutors to investigate dates that were changed on official state election documents, the first voting “irregularities” it has flagged in the wake of the 2018 elections.

Want more BFT? Leave us a voicemail on our page or follow us on Twitter @BFT_Podcast and Facebook @BluntForceTruthPodcast. We want to hear from you! There’s no better place to get the #BluntForceTruth.

Rantt

Published  5 months ago

As the White House fails to defend the US from threats abroad, Trump fails to uphold the constitution at home.

Here are today’s top stories:

1. “The security and well-being of the United States are at greater risk than at any time in decades. America’s military superiority—the hard-power backbone of its global influence and national security—has eroded to a dangerous degree.”

So begins a recently published assessment from the National Defense Strategy Commission on the state of the country’s national defense. The bi-partisan, congressionally empowered commission goes on to the paint a picture of a US military unprepared to meet the challenges of resurgent threats, one that would “struggle to win, or perhaps lose, a war against China or Russia.” Even such calamities as a Chinese invasion of Taiwan or a North Korea missile strike on South Korea may catch the US flat-footed. (As if to illustrate this point, the Russian military succeeded in jamming GPS signals during a major NATO military exercise in Norway today.)

The commission’s main purpose is to evaluate the National Defense Strategy (NDS), the document in which the Defense Department outlines its priorities. The 2018 NDS called for a greater focus on China and Russia’s military resurgence, as well as belligerence from North Korea and Iran while scaling back counterterrorism efforts. The commission concurred with this direction but warns that the US is overestimating its ability to confront these threats, citing wide-ranging vulnerabilities across multiple areas including missile defense, cyber warfare, electronic warfare, space operations, and nuclear deterrence.

In a separate interview, Ambassador Eric Edelman, the commission’s co-chair, stressed that consistently higher military spending- at minimum 3-5 percent annually, an increase Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has requested- is needed to make up this shortfall. While spending has decreased, from about 4.7% of GDP in 2010 to just over 3% last year, any increases ought to be coupled with stipulations for smarter and more efficient spending by the incoming Congress. Hundreds of billions of dollars are wasted by the Pentagon, often on administrative and bureaucratic matters. Add that to the list of shortcomings.

2. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker remains under fire after he replaced Jeff Sessions last week. Not only has he received calls for his recusal due to the anti-Mueller views he’s espoused and his ties to Sam Clovis who is a witness in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe, his appointment has also been called unconstitutional by conservative legal scholars. Members of the Federalist Society have defected and organized a group called “Checks And Balances” with the purpose of spotlighting Trump’s threats to the rule of law, including his appointment of Whitaker. This effort is being led by Kellyanne Conway’s husband George Conway.

This all comes as Maryland’s Attorney General sues the Trump administration over Whitaker’s appointment. Today, the DOJ argued that Whitaker’s appointment was constitutional Or, as Slate put it: “Here’s that argument, in a nutshell: The Constitution’s text doesn’t really matter; the Framers didn’t mean what they said; and an acting attorney general who served without Senate confirmation for six days in 1866 provides the historical precedent to justify Whitaker’s claim to the office.”

3. CNN has sued President Trump and several aides for the restoration of White House press access to Jim Acosta. Acosta’s press access was denied after he pressed President Trump on his lies regarding the migrant caravan during a press conference. The White House then used a fake video from Infowars to claim Acosta assaulted a White House intern. And now, in response to CNN’s lawsuit, the Trump administration is claiming that they have the ability to deny any reporter White House press credentials. Legal precedent and the first amendment beg to differ.

4. The budget deficit hit over $100 billion for the month of October, the largest in three years and a 60 percent increase from a year ago, per Bloomberg News. The biggest reason for the shortfall was from Trump’s tax cuts, which outweighed the returns generated from an otherwise booming economy, causing spending to outpace tax revenue by a ratio of 2 to 1. Trump’s first full fiscal year, which ended in September, saw the overall budget deficit grow to $779 billion, the highest since 2012, when the country was still reeling from recession. At that time, Republicans used fiscal conservatism as a weapon to obstruct every move Obama tried to make to revive a recovering economy and lower unemployment. Once in power, the numbers show they abandoned all pretenses of fiscal restraint.

5. A rape trial acquittal in Ireland has sparked widespread protests and a national conversation about sexual assault and consent. A 27-year-old man was found not guilty of raping a 17-year-old woman in a muddy patch in the Irish city of Cork, despite the victim’s testimony she was dragged over 30 yards and a witness seeing the man’s hands on her throat. In her closing arguments, defense lawyer Elizabeth O’Connell insinuated the victim was asking for it, saying “You have to look at the way she was dressed. She was wearing a thong with a lace front.”

The trial outcome, and Ms. O’Connell’s comments in particular, drew country-wide ire, with protests forming in several cities, with women placing underwear at the courthouse in Cork and other prominent sites. Irish women also posted pictures of their underwear under the hashtag #ThisIsNotConsent to protest rape culture and victim blaming.

by: Jossif Ezekilov

Jossif Ezekilov is the Foreign Affairs Editor at Rantt Media. Born in Bulgaria and raised in DC, Jossif gave up a semi-promising career as a goat herder/rapper to pursue his dream of working for a better world. During a verbal altercation, Bill O’Reilly once told Mr. Ezekilov to go work for the progressives. So he did, and now only one of them works in the media business. At Rantt, Jossif focuses on making international news and foreign policy more accessible to the casually interested reader. He also writes on a variety of issues, including global health, international development, gender equality, civil rights, and US politics.

American Greatness

Published  5 months ago

Just hours after Jeff Sessions resigned as attorney general last Wednesday at the president’s behest, #TheResistance found its newest target for destruction: Sessions’ interim replacement, Matthew Whitaker.

Negative coverage about the acting attorney general has dominated national publications and cable news outlets. Reporters have portrayed Whitaker as a Trump lackey, a crackpot, and an “attack dog”; Democratic leaders are demanding that he recuse himself from overseeing Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation; on Tuesday, incoming House Intelligence Committee chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) warned that if Whitaker fails to step aside from the probe, “his actions will be exposed.” (Of course, this is pure propaganda. As Andrew McCarthy explains, Whitaker is well-qualified and meets the legal requirements for an interim presidential cabinet appointment.)

NeverTrump “conservatives” are aiding Schiff and the media in their campaign to paralyze if not remove Whitaker. Commercials attacking the acting attorney general were aired on several Sunday morning political shows. The ads were sponsored by “Republicans for the Rule of Law,” a group founded earlier this year by Bill Kristol, the editor-at-large of The Weekly Standard. The group’s primary role so far appears to be pimping for the Mueller probe, a political witch-hunt that Kristol and his fellow NeverTrumpers pray will lead to the impeachment and removal of the president. The Left and their NeverTrump footsoldiers fear Whitaker will thwart the special counsel’s investigation instead of rubber stamping Mueller’s ever-expanding investigation as Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has done over the past 18 months.

Buying primo air time on network television doesn’t come cheap. So who is funding “Republicans for the Rule of Law” and their attacks on the Republican president and his acting attorney general? Is it big Republican donors?

We haven’t found any, but we have learned learned that one of Kristol’s benefactors is progressive billionaire Pierre Omidyar, the co-founder of eBay.

In addition to funding dissident ex-conservatives, Omidyar, 51, and his wife—who have pledged to give their more than $10 billion fortune to charity—operate an extensive network of nonprofits and foundations around the world. Omidyar has directed millions of dollars to a variety of progressive causes and political candidates: he and wife “have have given more than $500,000 to federal candidates and groups—nearly all of them Democrats—since 1999,” including six-figure donations to the Democratic senate and congressional campaign committees.

The Omidyars have also been among the most prolific supporters of left-wing causes for years. According to a 2014 report by the Media Research Center, “Michael Bloomberg, Warren Buffett, Pierre Omidyar, Tom Steyer and George Soros’s son, Jonathan are major funders of the left. Together, they have contributed at least $2.7 billion since 2000 to groups pushing abortion, gun control, climate change alarmism and liberal candidates.” And lately, Omidyar seems to have become a big fan of Kristol’s, probably because of their mutual hatred of Donald Trump. Digging a little deeper it looks like they may have more in common since Kristol has recently found his “inner socialist” and he now opposes Republican candidates.

One of Omidyar’s nonprofits is the Democracy Fund. In 2015, the Democracy Fund awarded nearly $9 million in grants, “many of which went to left-wing organizations.” One Democracy Fund recipient is currently in court fighting the results of the Georgia gubernatorial race, which was won by Republican Brian Kemp.

An affiliate of that fund disclosed on its website that it has given as least $600,000 to Kristol’s umbrella group, Defending Democracy Together, since May. (Other NeverTrumpers involved in the group are author Mona Charen, strategist Linda Chavez, and former governor Christine Todd Whitman.) Republicans for the Rule of Law operates under the purview of Defending Democracy Together.

So why is a group of so-called principled “conservatives” accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars from a leftist billionaire who has shown zero dedication to conservative causes, an activist who finances interests that are inimical to conservative values and policies, and who bankrolls Democratic candidates hostile to mainstream conservatives?

Because the same phonies who claims to be all about principles and integrity are now the folks willing to do almost anything to take down Trump. (Remember that the next time they lecture pro-Trump Republicans about being a cult.)

Omidyar is a virulent Trump foe; he donated $250,000 to the NeverTrump PAC in 2016. Calling Trump a “dangerous authoritarian demagogue” during the presidential primaries, the Iranian-born entrepreneur proclaimed that “endorsing Donald Trump immediately disqualifies you from any position of public trust.” His Twitter timeline—much like Kristol’s—is an ongoing diatribe against the president and his allies. He recently has claimed the president is suffering from a “failing mental capacity” and called him “corrupt and incapacitated.”

Omidyar also is tied to another billionaire archenemy of the president: George Soros. Omidyar has donated millions to Soros’s pet projects, including the Open Society Foundations, a main funder of Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, and the Center for American Progress.

Among the goals of the Open Society Foundations are “creating a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants, cutting the number of prison inmates by 50%, enacting comprehensive immigration reform, increasing welfare handouts, and raising taxes to redistribute wealth.” (The Standard has other ties to Soros-linked projects and seems to be running a lot of cover for the global financier of late. More on that in an upcoming piece.)

It’s one thing for a political pundit like Kristol to brand himself as a Trump-hating “conservative” to earn hits on cable news shows and get fawning coverage in elite media publications. It’s quite another to partner up with the sworn enemies of the very principles one has claimed not only to champion, but of which he has insisted he is the last, best defender.

His new friend is a foe of these causes and has been for decades, which makes it appear as though Kristol is ready to sell out to any deep pocket just to damage the president while hiding the fact that his crusade is financed, at least in part, by a major anti-Trump, anti-conservative left-wing billionaire. (There is no information posted on Republicans for the Rule of Law’s website, or Kristol’s umbrella group, that discloses their funding sources.) The irony is rich indeed that “Republicans for the Rule of Law” is financed by a Democrat.

At what point do others stand up and not just deny Kristol his “conservative” cred, but acknowledge that he is now on the other side? When you join the battlefield alongside partisan hacks like Adam Schiff and take payoffs from leftist billionaires to do their political dirty work, there is nothing Republican or conservative, or frankly, decent, about you.

Content created by the Center for American Greatness, Inc. is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a significant audience. For licensing opportunities for our original content, please contact licensing@centerforamericangreatness.com.

Photo Credit: Joshua Blanchard/Getty Images for Politicon

TheHill

Published  5 months ago

The latest news headlines indicate that the Russia 2016 election-meddling investigation is ramping up. Connected with this probe is the now infamous meeting President Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., had with Russian officials last June. While we are still trying to ascertain who all was in that meeting and what, if any, information was shared that could have helped Trump’s presidential campaign, we cannot ignore another meeting with a foreign government — one where we have proof serious campaign violations were committed.

Back in January of this year, Politico reported that Democratic official met with Ukrainian officials to get information on the Trump campaign in an effort to boost Hillary Clinton’s presidential bid. While it didn’t get nearly the mainstream media scrutiny that the Donald Trump Jr.'s Russia meeting is getting, it did prompt President Trump to correctly ask why it was being swept under the rug.

In a tweet last month, Trump said “Ukrainian efforts to sabotage Trump campaign — ‘quietly working to boost Clinton.’ So where is the investigation A.G.” It even prompted a Ukraine member of parliament, Andre Derkah, to send a letter last month to Ukraine’s prosecutor general requesting “that authorities launch a pretrial investigation into ‘illegal interference in the election of President of the United States organized by a criminal investigation.’” It also raised some very serious concerns for our organization, the Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust (FACT).

This month, FACT filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) against the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and its Ukrainian-American consultant, Alexandra Chalupa, for knowingly soliciting and accepting illegal, in-kind contributions from the Ukrainian government.

Specifically, the complaint contends that, last year, Ukrainian-American operative and DNC consultant, Alexandra Chalupa met with Ukrainian government officials to get information in an effort to expose ties between Trump, his former campaign manager Paul Manafort and Russia. As reported, a political officer in the Ukrainian Embassy was instructed to help Chalupa conduct research on connections between Trump, Manafort and Russia. The DNC subsequently acknowledged that it had knowledge of the research.

First, according to federal law, an in-kind contribution consists of “anything of value, including information and leads, the fruits of paid research, or similar investigatory activity, to a political committee.” Second, federal law also prohibits accepting or receiving anything of value from foreign nationals and the Ukrainian government officials are foreign nationals.

Since Chalupa allegedly engaged in both activities as a DNC staffer, this collusion would constitute an illegal, in-kind contribution. And, even though the DNC claimed it “did not incorporate [Chalupa’s] findings in its dossiers on the subjects,” that would be irrelevant as the DNC solicited and received valuable opposition research.

Given what we know today about both situations, it’s clear they both merit serious investigation.

To date we have no proof that anything of value was received by the Trump campaign as a result of the Donald Jr. meeting. In fact, the Russian lawyer who meet with Trump’s son, Natalia Veselnitskaya, said: “I never had any damaging or sensitive information about Hillary Clinton. It was never my intention to have that.”

Foreign influence in our politics is nothing new but it is very concerning and should be investigated. The DNC/Ukraine connection is serious, and the public deserves answers.

Matthew Whitaker, a former U.S. attorney, is executive director of the Foundation for Accountability and Civic Trust (FACT), a nonprofit ethics watchdog.

The views expressed by contributors are their own and are not the views of The Hill.

dailycaller

Published  5 months ago

Jeannie Rhee previously represented Hillary and the Clinton Foundation

The DC Chronicle

Published  5 months ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — Maryland is challenging the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as the new U.S. acting attorney general.

A filing, a draft of which was obtained earlier by The Associated Press, argues that President Donald Trump sidestepped the Constitution and normal procedure by naming Whitaker to the position in place of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (ROH’-zen-styn).

Whitaker was appointed Nov. 7 after the White House demanded the resignation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Whitaker had been Sessions’ chief of staff.

The Maryland filing was made Tuesday in a legal dispute with the Trump administration over the Affordable Care Act. That lawsuit names Sessions as a defendant. The state seeks to name Rosenstein as a defendant over Whitaker.

Spokespeople for the Justice Department haven’t responded to an email seeking comment.

Dan Bongino

Published  5 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will speak with ethics officials at the Department of Justice about matters that “may warrant recusal.”

In a statement acquired by The Hill, DOJ Spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said, “Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker is fully committed to following all appropriate processes and procedures at the Department of Justice, including consulting with senior ethics officials on his oversight responsibilities and matters that may warrant recusal.”

Democrats have made repeated calls for Whitaker to recuse himself from his oversight responsibilities in the Russia investigation because he has previously spoken out against the Mueller investigation and the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investigation.

Whitaker told radio host Andrew Wilkow that he does not believe there was any collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

LISTEN: Dan discusses the legality of Whitaker’s appointment as Acting Attorney General

“The truth is there was no collusion with the Russians and the Trump campaign,” he said. “There was interference by the Russians into the election, but that was not collusion with the campaign. That’s where the left seems to be combining those two issues.”

In the same interview, Whitaker stressed that there has been no evidence to suggest any wrongdoing with the Trump campaign and Russia. “The last thing they want right now is for the truth to come out, and for the fact that there’s not a single piece of evidence that demonstrates that the Trump campaign had any illegal or any improper relationships with the Russians,” he said.

In July 2017, Whitaker appeared on CNN where he suggested that a new Attorney General could reduce Mueller’s budget to grind the investigation to a halt:

On Sunday, Democrats sent a letter to a DOJ ethics official demanding his recusal from the Special Counsel investigation.

The letter reads, in part:

There are serious ethical considerations that require Mr. Whitaker’s immediate recusal from any involvement with the Special Counsel investigation of the Russian government’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election. Mr. Whitaker has a history of hostile statements toward Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation, including televised statements suggesting that the investigation

be defunded or subjected to strict limitations on its scope

Whitaker,48, was appointed Acting Attorney General last week, when then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigned at President Trump’s request. He previously served as Sessions’ chief of staff at the Department of Justice.

In 2004, Whitaker was appointed by President Bush as U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa and, in 2014, ran in the Iowa GOP Senate primary, where he lost to Joni Ernst.

He was managing partner of the Des Moines, Iowa law firm, Whitaker Hagenow & Gustoff LLP from November 2009 to September 2017.

WayneDupree.com

Published  5 months ago

House Democrats are trying to flex their muscle against Republicans now that they have won the Midterms.

President Trump replaced the former Attorney General Jeff Sessions with Acting AG Matthew Whitaker. Related: Democrats Want Acting Attorney General To Recuse Himself Like Former AG Sessions!

Whitaker has a history of believing in the law, and with that, he’s made news from an op-ed he wrote concerning Hillary Clinton and what happened before the 2016 Presidential election. Whitaker felt that Clinton should have been prosecuted. Related: Acting Attorney General Past Op-Ed; “I Would Indict Hillary Clinton”

Democrats feel that by installing Whitaker, he will not only stop Special Counsel Robert Mueller from doing his job, but he will also notify the White House of all types of findings from Mueller’s investigation.

More from Wayne Dupree

Sen. Chuck Schumer has already asked for Whitaker to recuse himself and now Rep. Adam Schiff is doing the same thing.

If Whitaker doesn’t recuse himself and has any involvement in Mueller’s probe, we will expose it, including whether he made any commitments to Trump, is serving as a back channel, or interfering in the probe. He will be held accountable. There must be no ambiguity about that.

I assume at one time or the other, this fool asked Eric Holder, Loretta Lynch, Mueller, James Comey, or Rod Rosenstein, to recuse themselves? Double Standards?

Video Transcript:

I want to make this very clear, if he doesn’t recuse himself, if he has any involvement whatsoever in this Russia probe, we are going to find out whether he made commitments to the President about the probe, whether he is serving as a back channel to the President or his lawyers about the probe, whether he’s doing anything to interfere with the probe. Mr. Whitaker needs to understand that he will be called to answer and any role that he plays will be exposed to the public. We don’t want there to be any ambiguity about that.

Democrats always talking about what must be done especially if it involves them at a disadvantage.

Don’t get me wrong, I think Whitaker is an idiot, biased, and absolutely unqualified for the job. But, they can’t force him to recuse if he doesn’t want to. But they can’t block the appointment because it was not constitutional

Schiff and his cronies must have had something on Sessions to get him to recuse himself. Now they got to threaten Whitaker. I hope he doesn’t fall for it.

I hope Trump picks a prominent AG that will kick some Democrat butt and put them in their place.

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Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

On Wednesday's broadcast of the Fox News Channel's "Shepard Smith Reporting," Fox News Senior Judicial Analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano criticized the | Video

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

The Deep State is absolutely terrified of President Trump’s appointment to Acting Attorney General, Matthew Whitaker. Today the state of Maryland announced their legal action into the constitutionality of Whitaker’s appointment. The Deep State must have him removed to continue the Mueller witch hunt.

Matthew Whitaker, the new Acting AG who replaced Jeff Sessions after Sessions turned in his resignation last Wednesday afternoon, is a former Iowa Hawkeye Tight End in college who played in the Rose Bowl.

When appointed as Acting AG, Whitaker took over Rosenstein’s job overseeing the Mueller witch hunt. He is described as a “Trump loyalist” who has been privately described as the West Wing’s “eyes and ears” in the Justice Department, says the New York Times.

In August of 2017, Matthew Whitaker penned an op-ed for CNN titled, “Mueller’s Investigation of Trump is Going Too Far” wherein he argued the Special Counsel is roving outside of his jurisdiction to investigate Trump-Russia collusion.

And there’s more…in July 2016, before the presidential election, Matthew Whitaker penned an opinion piece for USA today where he argued that Hillary Clinton should be locked up.

Whitaker wrote:

According to FBI Director James Comey’s statement on Tuesday, former secretary of State Hillary Clinton could have been charged with violating several different code sections, and he detailed the evidence that supports bringing criminal charges.

Yet, Director Comey’s judgment was that “no reasonable prosecutor” would bring the case. I disagree. I believe myself to have been a reasonable prosecutor, and when the facts and evidence show a criminal violation has been committed, the individuals involved should not dictate whether the case is prosecuted…

…A reasonable prosecutor may ask, if on numerous occasions, an unknown State Department employee had taken top secret information from a secured system, emailed that information on a Gmail account, and stored the information on a personal server for years, would that individual be prosecuted? I believe they would.

Whitaker was on CNN and he questioned the wisdom of the Mueller team knocking down former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s door at 4 in the morning –

I joined @CNN last night to discuss what the latest developments in the Manafort investigation could mean. See more: https://t.co/bOzZ5ap31b pic.twitter.com/RcEcjwmbDn

— Matt Whitaker ?? (@MattWhitaker46) August 11, 2017

He also found it ironic that former FBI Director James Comey could be investigated for midhandling classified information –

Comey could go under investigation for mishandling classified information? That’s what you call ironic. Full clip: https://t.co/c9YV1KRilv pic.twitter.com/jUKSab7ka7

— Matt Whitaker ?? (@MattWhitaker46) September 13, 2017

In 2015 he pointed out the obvious that Obama’s Administration was the most corrupt ever –

Most transparent? Two-thirds of federal agencies flunked Freedom of Information Act test http://t.co/UMOR8E7Qft pic.twitter.com/67bLL43kOF

— Matt Whitaker ?? (@MattWhitaker46) April 29, 2015

The Inquisitr

Published  5 months ago

Jacob Wohl, the 20-year-old Donald Trump mega-fan and conspiracy theorist who on November 2 attempted to stage a hoax accusing Russia Investigation Special Counsel Robert Mueller of sexual assault, as NBC News reported, appeared on Wednesday to claim credit for the arrest of Michael Avenatti.

Avenatti, who skyrocketed to fame earlier this year as the media-friendly lawyer for adult video star Stormy Daniels in her lawsuit against Donald Trump, was arrested by Los Angeles detectives on Wednesday on suspicion of domestic violence, the LAPD confirmed on its Twitter account.

The news of Avenatti’s arrest, as Inquisitr reported, first appeared on the celebrity gossip site TMZ — which initially said that the alleged victim was Avenatti’s estranged wife, Lisa Storie.

But after Storie issued a statement through her lawyer, posted on Twitter by CNN correspondent MJ Lee, denying that she was involved in any such incident, TMZ updated its own story.

“We were initially told by our sources the alleged victim was Avenatti’s estranged wife,” TMZ wrote in the update. “We now know it was not. The incident involved a different woman.” The site also reported that Avenatti would be released on $50,000 bail, with an “emergency protective order” prohibiting him from contact with the still-unidentified alleged victim.

But soon after the arrest was made public, a supposed private investigation firm — Surefire Intelligence — directly connected to Wohl and his attempt to frame Mueller, posted a cryptic message to its own Twitter feed. The post linked to a news report of Avenatti’s arrest, and contained the comment, “Surefire Intelligence strikes again.”

In a hipster coffee shop here in West LA. Right next to us we overheard a group of young women who were absolutely ecstatic to learn that Acting-AG Matthew Whitaker is preparing to SHUT DOWN Mueller pic.twitter.com/fg2EZebqbB

— Jacob Wohl (@JacobAWohl) November 8, 2018

Wohl himself retweeted the Surefire Intelligence tweet. While Wohl has denied that he is connected to Surefire Intelligence, the supposed company “is linked to Wohl in numerous ways, including domain records and a company phone that redirects to a number registered to Wohl’s mother,” according to NBC News.

It was Surefire Intelligence that sent emails to several women offering them sizable cash payments if they would publicly and falsely accuse Mueller of sexual assault, according to the Above The Law legal blog.

Though he retweeted the “Surefire Intelligence strikes again” tweet, Wohl later posted a Twitter message of his own, appearing to take a high road with regard to the Avenatti arrest.

“Michael Avenatti is innocent until proven guilty. Even though I disagree with him, I grant the presumption of innocence that he refused to grant to Justice Kavanaugh,” Wohl wrote, referring to allegations by Avenatti’s client Julie Swetnick that then-Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh had participated in parties where women were drugged and gang raped, as Inquisitr has reported.

The Intercept

Published  5 months ago

The correct response to a white nationalist president is to relentlessly resist and call out his behavior as dangerously abnormal.

POLITICUSUSA

Published  5 months ago

By Sarah N. Lynch

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Acting U.S. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will consult with ethics officials about any matters that could require him to recuse himself, the Justice Department said on Monday, after critics called on him to step aside from overseeing a Special Counsel probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“Acting AG Matt Whitaker is fully committed to following all appropriate processes and procedures at the Department of Justice, including consulting with senior ethics officials on his oversight responsibilities and matters that may warrant recusal,” spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said in a statement.

Whitaker became the acting attorney general last week after President Donald Trump ordered Jeff Sessions to resign following months of criticizing him for recusing himself from the Russia investigation, which Trump has repeatedly called a “witch hunt.”

Sessions’ recusal paved the way for Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to appoint Special Counsel Robert Mueller in May 2017.

The investigation has already led to criminal charges against dozens of people, including Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.

With Whitaker’s appointment, Rosenstein is no longer in charge of the Russia probe. Democrats in Congress have said they fear Whitaker could undermine or even fire Mueller after he expressed negative opinions about the probe before joining the Justice Department as Sessions’ chief of staff in October 2017.

On Sunday, top Democrats in the House of Representatives and the Senate sent a letter to the Justice Department’s chief ethics officer to ask whether Whitaker had received any guidance on possibly recusing himself from the Russia probe.

“Allowing a vocal opponent of the investigation to oversee it will severely undermine public confidence in the Justice Department’s work on this critically important matter,” the letter said.

(Reporting by Sarah N. Lynch; additional reporting by Makini Brice; Editing by Sandra Maler and Sonya Hepinstall)

CNBC

Published  5 months ago

Michael Cohen, former personal attorney for U.S. President Donald Trump, exits the Loews Regency hotel and walks toward a taxi cab, July 27, 2018 in New York City.

Michael Cohen, the former personal lawyer for President Donald Trump, took a train Monday to Washington from New York to talk to investigators from the office of special counsel Robert Mueller.

A person familiar with the matter, who declined to be named, told CNBC that Cohen visited Washington with criminal defense lawyer Guy Petrillo to speak with Mueller's team.

Cohen's meeting with Mueller's team was only the latest in a series of sit-downs the attorney has had with the special counsel's office since pleading guilty in August to federal criminal charges. Those included campaign contribution violations related to payments to two women, purportedly at the behest of Trump. That case was brought by federal investigators in the Southern District of New York, not Mueller's team.

On Monday, an ABC News reporter caught Cohen on video walking through the Union Station railroad complex on Capitol Hill in Washington, accompanied by Petrillo.

Cohen did not respond to a series of questions fired at him during the video, including ones asking why he was in Washington, whether he was meeting with Mueller, or whether he was going to "meet with the president."

Cohen kept a deadpan look on his face during all the questions except for the last, when he was asked how his train ride was.

"The train was great," Cohen cracked, flashing a grin.

Petrillo did not immediately respond to a request for comment from CNBC.

Read more: Democrats are waiting for a Mueller report that may never come

Mueller is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, possible coordination between the Kremlin and the Trump campaign, and potential obstruction of justice by Trump himself.

The president has repeatedly called Mueller's investigation a "witch hunt" and denied any wrongdoing by him or his campaign.

The White House also has denied Trump had an affair with porn star Stormy Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, or with former Playboy model Karen McDougal. Cohen paid $130,000 to Daniels on the eve of the 2016 presidential election for her silence about the alleged tryst with Trump. McDougal received $150,000 that same year from the publisher of the Trump-friendly supermarket tabloid The National Enquirer, which did not publish her account of a relationship with the president before Election Day.

Last week, Trump forced out Attorney General Jeff Sessions and installed Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general in his place. The president had often publicly criticized Sessions for recusing himself from the Russia probe.

Whitaker's appointment put him in charge of Mueller's case. It also led to calls by a number of members of Congress to allow the special counsel to complete his work unimpeded.

Cohen is due to be sentenced Dec. 12 in U.S. District Court in Manhattan on charges of tax evasion, making false statements to a bank, and the two campaign contribution violations.

When he pleaded guilty, he did so without an explicit agreement to cooperate with prosecutors in hopes of reducing his potential criminal sentence.

But his voluntary cooperation with Mueller's team, as well as other meetings Cohen has reportedly had with federal prosecutors in New York and with New York state law enforcement officials, could win him leniency from the sentencing judge.

NBC News

Published  5 months ago

WASHINGTON — Two members of congress, a cabinet official, a presidential confidant and a frequent guest on Fox News are among those being considered by President Donald Trump to be the next attorney general, multiple sources tell NBC News.

One of those, former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, was a close adviser to the president in his 2016 presidential campaign. He has been largely sidelined by the administration since then but resurfaced at the White House on Thursday for what White House officials said was for a previously scheduled meeting on prison reform.

Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, and retiring Rep. Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, have also joined the list of those in the running, the sources say.

Ratcliffe, a former political appointee of President George W. Bush who was later appointed to be U.S. Attorney of the Eastern District of Texas, has become a top candidate.

He was elected to Congress in 2014 and has been named as the most conservative Texas legislator by the Heritage Foundation. He made a name for himself when he grilled former FBI agent Peter Strzok in a House Judiciary Committee hearing about text messages he sent ahead of the 2016 election.

Gowdy, who led the House investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's handling of the attack that led to the deaths of four Americans in Benghazi, is retiring from Congress at the end of the year and was a prosecutor before coming to Congress. He and Trump have had a contentious relationship, especially since Gowdy voted “present” on a House bill to keep the House’s Russia investigation going when every other Republican voted “no.”

Neither Ratcliffe nor Gowdy’s office responded to requests for comment.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., who is close to Gowdy, has become an adviser to the president on the position. Frequently mentioned for the job himself, Graham has said repeatedly that he is not interested. But anticipating that Sessions would be fired or would resign, he has been working on a list of potential replacements to present to the president.

And Graham, who could be the next chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, could have a large say on if the nominee is successful in the Senate.

Graham said he discussed Sessions’ successor with the president at the White House on Thursday. “I’m confident the White House is looking for someone who the President and country can have confidence in, and be confirmed by the Senate,” Graham said in a statement.

Other names that have been discussed include Noel Francisco, the current solicitor general of the United States, who was appointed by Trump last year. Trump’s Health and Human Services secretary Alex Azar is also a contender, sources tell NBC News.

Azar's spokeswoman, Caitlin Oakley said the secretary is happy in his current job. "Secretary Azar has repeatedly said that this is the best job he has ever had and that this is his dream job. He plans to continue serving President Trump as his HHS Secretary."

Andrew McCarthy, a former assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of new York and current columnist for the National Review, is also said to be under consideration. McCarthy is a common guest on Fox News, which Trump appreciates in an official.

McCarthy has also written that acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker could be amidst an “audition” for the permanent gig. Whitaker, Sessions former chief of staff, has spoken negatively about the Russia probe when he was an analyst on CNN.

But Whitaker’s appointment is unlikely, unless he is removed from the acting position. Under the Federal Vacancies Reform Act, a person appointed to the position of Acting Attorney General who has not previously been confirmed by the Senate must step out of the acting position in order to be confirmed on a permanent basis.

Finally, losing Kansas gubernatorial candidate Kris Kobach has been mentioned as well. Kobach, a former Kansas secretary of state and member of Trump’s transition team who led a failed advisory board to investigate voter fraud, has also made a name for himself on hard right immigration policies. But most observers say it would be quite difficult for Kobach to ever be confirmed by the Senate because of his controversial positions on hot button issues.

Getting passed the Senate will be a key requirement for any nominee. At least three Republicans have already said that protecting the Mueller investigation is a critical concern.

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine said the Mueller probe “must be allowed” to continue. Senator-elect Mitt Romney tweeted “it is imperative” the probe continues, and Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina said it will “undoubtedly be an important issue during the confirmation.”

Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

Arguments that President Trump cannot appoint Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general must be incorrect.

Dreshare

Published  5 months ago

Brenda Snipes (born September 7, 1950) is an American Political Personality and Broward County Attorney from Talladega (USA). She started working in Blanc

True Pundit

Published  5 months ago

NRATV host Dan Bongino explained who he’d like to see as the long-term replacement for former Attorney General Jeff Sessions on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Friday.

President Donald Trump requested and accepted Sessions’ resignation on Tuesday. The president publicly announced the decision on Twitter and revealed the interim AG to be Matthew Whitaker.

“Let me throw something out there some of the audience may jump back. I would love to see Ted Cruz,” Bongino said. “You get a double whammy out of this. You get a solid constitutional conservative who will never fault, this guy is principled. We know it, we love him.”

“Secondly, you get an open seat in Texas,” he concluded. “The Dems will pour a bunch of money into fools gold again, we’ll get Beto number two. They will waste all their money and time. They won’t spend it on other Senate seats and we win again in Texas. I think it’s a great plan.” – READ MORE

Conservative Tribune

Published  5 months ago

Matthew Whitaker’s tenure as acting attorney general may only be able to be measured in hours, but he’s already made a huge impact in how asylum-seekers are processed at the southern border.

According to a new interim final rule from the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security, those who enter the country illegally and are captured will no longer be able to claim asylum and will instead be returned to their country of origin on an expedited basis.

“Consistent with our immigration laws, the President has the broad authority to suspend or restrict the entry of aliens into the United States if he determines it to be in the national interest to do so,” Whitaker said in a joint statement with DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

“Today’s rule applies this important principle to aliens who violate such a suspension or restriction regarding the southern border imposed by the President by invoking an express authority provided by Congress to restrict eligibility for asylum.

“Our asylum system is overwhelmed with too many meritless asylum claims from aliens who place a tremendous burden on our resources, preventing us from being able to expeditiously grant asylum to those who truly deserve it. Today, we are using the authority granted to us by Congress to bar aliens who violate a Presidential suspension of entry or other restriction from asylum eligibility.”

TRENDING: Watch: Ignorant Joy Behar Doesn’t Know How Senate Elections Work, Humiliates Self on Nat’l TV

Translating that out of federalese, this is basically saying that those who cross into America illegally and then are captured cannot claim asylum as pursuant to the Immigration and Nationality Act — the same act that the president used to craft the travel ban, which was ultimately upheld by the Supreme Court.

That law holds that “(w)henever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate.”

The only way to gain political asylum, therefore, is to present oneself at a port of entry to the United States.

The New York Times crystalized the arguments for and against the move in their article on the new rule.

“Lawyers for immigration advocacy organizations said they violated a founding principle of federal asylum: to judge each person’s asylum claim on its own merits. And the lawyers said federal and international law made it clear that the United States must provide immigrants the opportunity to claim asylum regardless of whether they entered the country legally or illegally,” the Thursday article read.

“Trump administration officials defended the new approach, saying the president is responding to statistics that show that most migrants who seek asylum are eventually denied — but not before many of them skip their court hearings and choose to illegally stay in the United States.”

That last part is generally true. Few asylum seekers are able to establish a credible fear based on political persecution in their home country, which is why their application is typically denied. If they do have a realistic claim, presenting themselves at a port of entry is the proper way of doing things.

As for the legality of that, Bill Hing, general counsel at the Immigrant Legal Resource Center, told Newsweek that, “U.S. and international law does not specify that you have to go to a certain port.”

Whether or not this stands is going to be a matter of considerable debate. Whether it specifies you have to go to a certain port or not, under American law, seems again like it would be subject to the Immigration and Nationality Act — although that will certainly be a matter for the courts.

RELATED: ‘That’s Enough’: Trump Slaps Acosta Down After Scuffle for Mic with Female Aide

As for international law, that and $35 will usually get you an oil change. While there are obviously certain international legal norms everyone is expected to follow, the unsecured southern border represents an especial challenge to the United States. The abuse of the asylum process by individuals who have chosen to broke the law to get into the country in the first place, thus placing a strain on a system that already struggles to deal with legitimate asylum claims, should be an overriding concern in this case.

The Trump administration has also said those illegally in the country could apply for two other smaller programs as opposed to asylum, which would technically satisfy our treaty obligations. Whether treaty signatories buy this, and whether it ends up meaning anything, again remains to be seen.

No matter how this shakes out, it’s a sign that Whitaker is putting his stamp on the office posthaste — even if one gets the idea that President Trump had more than a little to do with the formulation of this policy. Say what you will about that, but Sessions certainly wasn’t willing to take this step.

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Observer

Published  5 months ago

No matter what Trump does, Mueller is still coming. “Nobody who’s close to the Russians is getting out of this,” an Intelligence Community official who assisted the Special Counsel’s investigation told me. Alex Wong/Getty Images

No matter what Trump does, Mueller is still coming. “Nobody who’s close to the Russians is getting out of this,” an Intelligence Community official who assisted the Special Counsel’s investigation told me. Alex Wong/Getty Images

For every day of his presidency—657 so far, if you’re counting—the issue of Donald J. Trump’s ties to Russia has darkened the Oval Office door. Since May 17, 2017, when former FBI director Robert S. Mueller was appointed Special Counsel to unravel Trump’s secret Kremlin linkages, the president has seethed, his rage seeping into his tweets. From its first day, President Trump has wanted to quash the Mueller investigation, and now he’s making his move.

But is it already too late? There’s mounting evidence it is, specifically that Team Mueller is ready to strike imminently with indictments, no matter what the White House does.

All the same, the feat was impetuous even for Trump. He could not wait even one day, dropping his bomb on Wednesday afternoon, on the heels of his wild, angry press conference about the midterm elections. Although Tuesday’s midterms were hardly the personal success that Trump presented them as—with the Democratic takeover of the House muted by GOP gains in the Senate—the hotly desired Democratic Blue Wave never quite swelled. The midterms were a setback for the White House, but hardly an unprecedented one. Barack Obama in 2010 and Bill Clinton in 1994 took worse midterm hits and got reelected.

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Nevertheless, only 18 hours after polls closed, President Trump cashiered his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, the cabinet’s most sincere Trumpian true believer. The move was long overdue; indeed, Sessions’ survival this long seems miraculous (that the attorney general’s strange forced-resignation letter lacked a date was the tell). Sessions committed the unpardonable sin in Trump’s eyes of recusing himself from the Russia probe, an act commonsensical for any attorney.

By finally getting rid of the hated Sessions, Trump opened the door to shutting down the Mueller investigation. The president cares nothing for precedent or rules, yet even for Trump what happened on Wednesday was a brazen act which seems destined to force a constitutional crisis.

Not content with pushing Sessions aside, Trump shoved Rod Rosenstein, the dutiful deputy attorney general who has overseen the Mueller probe, out of the way too. Rosenstein is still in his job, for now, but he has been removed from any role in the Mueller inquiry. There went the last bureaucratic top-cover for Team Mueller.

Trump then outdid himself by appointing as acting attorney general Sessions’ chief of staff, Matthew Whitaker. At the Justice Department, Whitaker is disliked as a Trump crony who is qualified, barely, to be the attorney general, being a former Federal prosecutor in Iowa.

However, Whitaker is also a critic of the Mueller inquiry, indeed a vehement one, who has advocated limiting and even shuttering any investigation into the president’s ties to Moscow. By any normal legal standards, Whitaker should immediately recuse himself from anything touching the Special Counsel’s office, but these are not normal times in our nation’s capital. Whitaker was chosen by the White House to fix the president’s Mueller problem by any means necessary. Whitaker’s own highly partisan and less-than-ethical past indicates that, for once, President Trump may have chosen the right man for the job.

Democrats are howling gigantic curses, as expected, but plenty of Republicans are also troubled by the Whitaker appointment. Many are challenging the legality of placing Whitaker in the position, even temporarily, to interfere with Mueller. Embarrassingly for the White House, George Conway, a top Washington legal eagle who is married to Kellyanne Conway, the president’s top consigliera, publicly denounced the Sessions defenestration, adding that replacing him with “nobody” Whitaker is “unconstitutional. It’s illegal. And it means that anything Whitaker does, or tries to do, in that position is invalid.”

Conservative legal celebrity John Yoo weighed in just as harshly. Reviled on the Left for his fierce defense of President George W. Bush during the bumpiest years of his administration, Yoo flatly denounced as “unconstitutional” the current White House effort to let Whitaker kill the Mueller inquiry as acting attorney general. If Trump wants Whitaker to do that, the nominee will need to pass Senate approval.

That’s a high-stakes gamble, and if the White House has any sense it will back off quickly before they have created a bona fide constitutional crisis there’s no way out of. That said, Trump may want a major crisis to buy time before Team Mueller drops indictments on the president, his relatives, and his retinue.

To abide by Justice Department rules, Mueller went silent for almost two months before the midterms, to avoid any appearance of election interference, but the Special Counsel’s office is now renewing the public side of their investigation. Team Mueller is reported to be working on the final draft of their report on the president and his Russian ties in 2016. Whatever that report says, it’s not likely to be flattering to Team Trump.

Worse for the White House, Mueller’s prosecutors are widely believed to be closing in on two people close to the president, Roger Stone and Donald Trump, Jr. Stone, the self-proclaimed Republican “ratf*cker,” has spoken openly of his fears of impending indictment over his links to WikiLeaks in 2016. Don Jr. is reported to be concerned as well, since he appears to have lied to Federal investigators about the fateful June 9, 2016 Trump Tower meeting with Russian intelligence officials.

Indictments of Stone, a friend of the president since the 1970s, or worse Trump’s son and namesake, seem certain to push the White House into greater paroxysms of rage. What might happen then is anybody’s guess. Trump’s desperation to shut down the Mueller inquiry before it cuts very close to home is therefore understandable.

It’s also a fool’s errand. In truth, it’s far too late to shut the Special Counsel down altogether. Mueller and his staff, veterans of Beltway wars, were not surprised by this week’s events. They were prepared. Any efforts by Acting AG Whitaker to block indictments will go public quickly and throw Washington into deep crisis. For Trump, there are no exits or off-ramps left.

When Mueller informs the public of more indictments is an open question. That they are coming, however, is not. And there are lots of them. The Special Counsel has been at work for almost 18 months now. An Intelligence Community official who assisted the Special Counsel’s investigation told me this week that Team Mueller is holding “dozens of sealed indictments” of people associated with the president, his 2015-16 campaign, and his administration. “Nobody who’s close to the Russians is getting out of this,” said the IC official. When will those indictments start being unsealed? Watch this space.

Vox

Published  5 months ago

Whitaker advised the president on launching a new special counsel while working as chief of staff for Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

the Guardian

Published  5 months ago

Matthew Whitaker a paid board member for World Patent Marketing as veteran tells Guardian: ‘I spent the money on a dream. I lost everything’

True Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Some politicians and pundits have questioned the constitutionality of President Donald Trump’s appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general this past Wednesday, in the wake of Jeff Sessions’ departure, citing the circumvention of the Senate’s advise-and-consent role.

New York Democrats Rep. Jerrold Nadler and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, as well as House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and others, have called for Whitaker to recuse himself from handling the Mueller investigation based on public comments Whitaker has made in the past about it.

Nadler’s role will soon include chairmanship of the House Judiciary Committee — affording him a position with considerable power.

Schumer announced that he, along with Pelosi and other fellow Democrats who are ranking members on their respective committees, was sending a letter to the chief ethics officer of the Justice Department, asking him to issue guidelines regarding Whitaker’s potential recusal from matters pertaining to the Mueller investigation.

If Whitaker does not recuse himself, Schumer said he would attach a demand for Whitaker’s non-interference to “must pass” legislation such as the spending bill — then risking another government shutdown.

As Schumer said on “State of the Union,” some senators — who may or may not have standing to bring such a suit — are pursuing legal action challenging Whitaker’s appointment. – READ MORE

POLITICUSUSA

Published  5 months ago

Trump’s installed Attorney General Mark Whitaker is under criminal FBI investigation for scamming millions of dollars from customers in an invention promotion scheme.

According to The Wall Street Journal:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is conducting a criminal investigation of a Florida company accused of scamming millions from customers during the period that Matthew Whitaker, the acting U.S. attorney general, served as a paid advisory-board member, according to an alleged victim who was contacted by the FBI and other people familiar with the matter.

World Patent Marketing, based in Miami Beach, shut down last year after being accused by the Federal Trade Commission of scamming customers out of $26 million. The company charged would-be inventors thousands of dollars to patent and promote their inventions, but provided almost no real services and threatened those who complained, the FTC said. The FTC’s action was a civil proceeding. The existence of a continuing FBI investigation suggests authorities are also looking into potential criminal charges.

Whitaker is another example of Trump hiring “the best people,” and by the best people, we mean people most likely to end up behind bars in an orange jumpsuit. It has been clear from day one that only the most corrupt of the corrupt would choose to work for a president and an administration that is the most overtly criminal in modern US political history.

Trump Top Law Enforcement Officer In The Country Is Under Criminal Investigation

The fact that the person that Trump installed to be the top law enforcement officer in the country is under criminal investigation says everything about the Trump administration. Trump isn’t just trying to escape justice. The President Of The United States is trying to corrupt an erode national institutions that deliver justice.

Mark Whitaker should be nowhere near, much less running, the Department of Justice.

For more discussion about this story join our Rachel Maddow and MSNBC group.

Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

Attorney George Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, declared in a New York Times op-ed published Thursday that President Donald Trump’s appointment of Matthew Whitaker as acting Attorney General is “unconstitutional” and “illegal.”

The premise by which Conway and co-author Neal Katyal’s argue against Whitaker’s appointment is based on the Constitution’s Appointments Clause — the provision to which principal officers of the United States must not only be nominated by the president but also confirmed by the Senate using the body’s “Advice and Consent” powers. This argument, Coway and Katyal write, was the basis of a Wall Street Journal article penned by conservative scholar Steven Calabresi, in which it was argued that the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller to oversee the Russia investigation was unconstitutional because he was nominated by the president.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed the former FBI director to lead the investigation in May 2017. One day after the midterm election, then-attorney general Jeff Sessions submitted his resignation at the behest of President Donald Trump, according to a leaked copy of the now former top Justice Department official.

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While Conway and Katyal disagreed with Calabresi conclusion, they concur with his assessment that the “core principle” of the clause is not only correct but actually serves as a legal justification for preventing Whitaker from taking the temporary role of the country’s chief lawyer. Thus, Conway and his co-author contend, Whitaker’s installment is “unconstitutional” and illegal,” adding that “it means that anything Mr. Whitaker does, or tries to do, in that position is invalid.”

Much of the commentary about Mr. Whitaker’s appointment has focused on all sorts of technical points about the Vacancies Reform Act and Justice Department succession statutes. But the flaw in the appointment of Mr. Whitaker, who was Mr. Sessions’s chief of staff at the Justice Department, runs much deeper. It defies one of the explicit checks and balances set out in the Constitution, a provision designed to protect us all against the centralization of government power.

If you don’t believe us, then take it from Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, whom President Trump once called his “favorite” sitting justice. Last year, the Supreme Court examined the question of whether the general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board had been lawfully appointed to his job without Senate confirmation. The Supreme Court held the appointment invalid on a statutory ground.

Justice Thomas agreed with the judgment, but wrote separately to emphasize that even if the statute had allowed the appointment, the Constitution’s Appointments Clause would not have. The officer in question was a principal officer, he concluded. And the public interest protected by the Appointments Clause was a critical one: The Constitution’s drafters, Justice Thomas argued, “recognized the serious risk for abuse and corruption posed by permitting one person to fill every office in the government.” Which is why, he pointed out, the framers provided for advice and consent of the Senate.

Further, the pair argues that Whitaker’s lack of qualifications puts the Justice Department and its cases at risk. “Constitutionally, Matthew Whitaker is a nobody,” write Conway and Katyal. “For the president to install Mr. Whitaker as our chief law enforcement officer is to betray the entire structure of our charter document.”

Whitaker’s appointment does not require Senate confirmation because he previously served as Sessions’ chief of staff. The lack of scrutiny, as the pair write, leaves the public with an acting Attorney General whom may have serious legal and philosophical differences with the spirit of the agency. “The public is entitled to that assurance, especially since Mr. Whitaker’s only supervisor is President Trump himself, and the president is hopelessly compromised by the Mueller investigation. That is why adherence to the requirements of the Appointments Clause is so important here, and always,” the two write.

POLITICO

Published  5 months ago

Sens. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and Chris Coons (D-Del.) plan to ask for a floor vote on legislation to shield Special Counsel Robert Mueller from a firing when the upper chamber returns to session next week, Flake said on Thursday.

The bipartisan Mueller protection legislation cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee in April but has seen no floor action amid public skepticism from Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) that Mueller's Russia investigation faces any legitimate threat from President Donald Trump.

Following Trump's Wednesday ouster of former Attorney General Jeff Sessions in favor of acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker — who has publicly criticized the Mueller probe — Flake tweeted, “it is more important than ever to protect the Special Counsel.”

Flake and Coons' plan to seek unanimous agreement to vote on the bill, however, are still likely to draw an objection from the GOP side of the aisle.

McConnell told a radio station in his home state on Thursday that "I don’t think there’s any chance that the Mueller investigation will not be allowed to finish" in light of Sessions' departure from the Department of Justice.

Democrats are all but guaranteed to support next week's bipartisan push for action on the Mueller protection bill, which was the product of months-long talks to combine two different versions of the legislation.

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) joined Flake and the GOP's initial sponsors of pro-Mueller measures, Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), in voting for the bill when the committee approved it earlier this year.

WayneDupree.com

Published  5 months ago

if Democrats start going after Trump with investigations, Whitaker will be unleashed to go after Hillary

justice

Published  5 months ago

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen today announced an Interim Final Rule declaring that those aliens who contravene a presidential suspension or limitation on entry into the United States through the southern border with Mexico issued under section 212(f) or 215(a)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) will be rendered ineligible for asylum.

The Acting Attorney General and the Secretary issued the following joint statement:

“Consistent with our immigration laws, the President has the broad authority to suspend or restrict the entry of aliens into the United States if he determines it to be in the national interest to do so. Today's rule applies this important principle to aliens who violate such a suspension or restriction regarding the southern border imposed by the President by invoking an express authority provided by Congress to restrict eligibility for asylum. Our asylum system is overwhelmed with too many meritless asylum claims from aliens who place a tremendous burden on our resources, preventing us from being able to expeditiously grant asylum to those who truly deserve it. Today, we are using the authority granted to us by Congress to bar aliens who violate a Presidential suspension of entry or other restriction from asylum eligibility.”

Section 212(f) of the Immigration and INA states that “[w]henever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate.”

Further, Section 215(a) of the INA states that it is “unlawful…for any alien to depart from or enter or attempt to depart from or enter the United States except under such reasonable rules, regulations, and orders, and subject to such limitations and exceptions as the President may prescribe.”

In Section 208(d)(5)(B) of the INA, Congress specified that the Attorney General “may provide by regulation for any other conditions or limitations on the consideration of an application for asylum.”

Today’s new rule applies to prospective presidential proclamations, and is not retroactive.

Asylum is a discretionary form of relief granted by the Executive Branch on a discretionary basis to those fleeing persecution on the basis of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion. The rule does not render such aliens ineligible for withholding of removal under the INA or protection from removal under the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.

Sean Hannity

Published  5 months ago

DNC Chair Tom Perez slammed the resignation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions Wednesday; calling his firing a “gross abuse of power” despite calling for the senior Trump aide’s removal in March 2017.

“This is a gross abuse of power and extremely dangerous to the rule of law. And put simply, it doesn’t pass the smell test,” said Perez in written statement just minutes after Sessions announced he would be stepping down.

Trump's attempt to undermine the Mueller investigation with the hiring of Matthew Whitaker as Acting Attorney General is a gross abuse of power and extremely dangerous to the rule of law. https://t.co/Hy4qpMghib

— Tom Perez (@TomPerez) November 7, 2018

The top Democrat conveniently ignores his heated rhetoric from early last year, demanding “Sessions must resign” after claiming he “lied under oath and committed perjury.”

No spin from Trump admin can hide the fact that Sessions lied under oath and committed perjury about Russian ties. Sessions must resign.

Conservative Review

Published  5 months ago

Friday on the radio, LevinTV host Mark Levin pointed out all the things that the Left ought to consider constitutional crises, but won’t.

At the start of his opening segment, Levin pointed out how the Left never seems bothered by the constitutional implications of things like runaway activist courts, a massive, entrenched federal bureaucracy, and President Obama’s efforts to work around Congress and federal law on immigration.

Instead, he concluded, Democrats would rather claim that Trump’s replacement of Attorney General Jeff Sessions with acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker.

Under the Vacancies Act, Levin explained, the president is allowed to appoint an acting attorney general to fill Sessions’ position for “no longer than 210 days.” This gives him time to find a replacement to be confirmed by the Senate.

Whitaker’s appointment as acting AG does not come close to a “constitutional crisis.”

Where's the outrage?@marklevinshow scorches Democrats for brushing domestic abuse allegations against Rep. Keith Ellison under the rug.

Watch more from Levin on CRTV ==> https://t.co/lkcHkMPqiJ pic.twitter.com/aCmaeCtnxF

— CRTV (@CRTV) August 24, 2018

Don’t miss an episode of LevinTV! Sign up for your FREE 30-day trial today!

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Guest post by Joe Hoft Matthew Whitaker, the new Acting AG who replaced Jeff Sessions after Sessions turned in his resignation Wednesday afternoon, is a former Iowa Hawkeye Tight End in college who played in the Rose Bowl.  Let’s hope he pancakes the Deep State defenders.  Whitaker is also taking over Rosenstein’s job overseeing the […]

Sara A. Carter

Published  5 months ago

Attorney General Jeff Sessions tendered his resignation on Wednesday at the request of President Trump, and his acting replacement, Matthew Whitaker, is alarming Democrats and Special Counsel Robert Mueller loyalists across the country. Whitaker, 48, joined the Department of Justice as Sessions’ chief of staff in October 2017 and has previously spoken out against the…

Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

Hollywood actress and leftist activist Alyssa Milano offered her ribs and her husband to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after the 85-year-old fractured three ribs in a fall Wednesday.

“Ruth Bader Ginsberg can have my ribs. And my kidneys and a lung. And anything else she needs. She can even have my husband on Thursdays,” tweeted Milano Thursday morning.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg can have my ribs. And my kidneys and a lung. And anything else she needs. She can even have my husband on Thursdays.

According to the Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg, Ginsburg requested police to take her to George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. early Thursday after experiencing discomfort overnight.

“Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg fell in her office at the Court last evening. She went home, but after experiencing discomfort overnight, went to George Washington University Hospital earlier this morning,” a statement via from the Supreme Court reads. “Tests showed that she fractured three ribs on her left side and she was admitted for observation and treatment.”

In her absence, the court went ahead Thursday with a courtroom ceremony welcoming new Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who joined the court last month. President Donald Trump and new acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker were also present.

Ginsburg has had a series of health problems over the years. The aging justice broke two ribs in a fall in 2012 and had two prior bouts with cancer. In 2014, she had a stent implanted to open a blocked artery and was also was hospitalized after a bad reaction to medicine in 2009.

But she has never missed Supreme Court arguments. The court won’t hear arguments again until November 26.

Rib fractures are common among older adults, particularly after falls. The severity depends in part on whether the ribs are cracked or broken all the way through, and how many are broken. The extent of Ginsburg’s injury was not clear at press time.

Appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993, Ginsburg rebuffed suggestions from some liberals that she should step down in the first two years of President Barack Obama’s second term, when Democrats also controlled the Senate and would have been likely to confirm her successor.

She already has hired clerks for the term that extends into 2020, indicating she has no plans to retire.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

100PercentFedUp.com

Published  5 months ago

Is this what Nancy Pelosi meant today when she talked about working together in a "bipartisan" fashion for the good of the country?

Chicks On The Right — Young Conservatives

Published  5 months ago

On Wednesday we learned that Jeff Sessions resigned as attorney general. Sessions did a lot of good things especially on immigration but his decision to recuse himself seems to have been too big of misstep and he clearly lost the confidence of Trump. So, now we have Matthew Whitaker as acting AG.

Whitaker seems like a solid guy but the Democrats don’t seem to like him at all. Chuck Schumer even went so far as to say that Whitaker should recuse himself from the Russia probe like Sessions did which is obviously ridiculous.

From The Hill:

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday said that acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker should recuse himself from overseeing special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

“Given his previous comments advocating defunding and imposing limitations on the Mueller investigation, Mr. Whitaker should recuse himself from its oversight for the duration of his time as acting attorney general,” Schumer said in a statement on Wednesday.

Trey Gowdy wasn’t impressed.

From The Daily Caller:

South Carolina Republican Rep. Trey Gowdy fired back at Senator Chuck Schumer on “Special Report With Bret Baier” for his comments about President Donald Trump’s decision to fire Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday.

“Every prosecutor has jurisdictional boundaries. I don’t know a single prosecutor that does not. Mueller’s jurisdictional boundaries were set by Rod Rosenstein in the memo you have seen and they were altered, amended in the memo that we have not seen. But there has never been a prosecutor that just had unfettered power to go investigate whatever the heck he or she wanted to do,” Gowdy stated in response to Schumer.

“If you’re a state prosecutor you can’t investigate federal crimes. If you’re in New York, you can’t investigate things in Idaho. So the notion that we are going to create a special counsel that has no boss, no jurisdictional strictures at all is just typical Chuck Schumer and I think it’s why so few people take them seriously,” he continued.

Gotta love Trey Gowdy.

He’s 100% right.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein headed to the White House Wednesday afternoon after Jeff Sessions was fired.

Shortly after Sessions turned in his resignation letter, a US official said the Acting Attorney General, Matthew Whitaker is expected to take over the Mueller probe.

Although Rosenstein is to remain DAG, rumors are flying that he will turn in his resignation within the next 24-48 hours.

Following the White House meeting, Rod Rosenstein canceled a speech scheduled for Thursday in San Francisco.

The Aspen Institute says it wasn’t given a reason for the cancellation said, NBC News reporter Heidi Przybyla.

NBC REPORTED: Following WH meeting today:

DAG Rod Rosenstein has canceled a speech scheduled for Thursday in San Francisco, the Aspen Institute says.

Rosenstein was scheduled to speak to the organization’s cybersecurity summit.

The institute says it wasn’t given a reason for the cancelation

Following WH meeting today:

DAG Rod Rosenstein has canceled a speech scheduled for Thursday in San Francisco, the Aspen Institute says.

Rosenstein was scheduled to speak to the organization's cybersecurity summit.

The institute says it wasn't given a reason for the cancelation

— Heidi Przybyla (@HeidiPrzybyla) November 8, 2018

Rod Rosenstein had a rough day; he is no longer in charge of the Mueller probe he created.

Then he canceled a scheduled speech…things aren’t looking so good for Mr. Rosenstein.

Neon Revolt

Published  5 months ago

I wish the shills would make up their minds. One day, I’m a pied piper leading people away from Q. The very next, I’m a pied piper leading them towards that silly LARP known as Q. (And …

the Guardian

Published  5 months ago

Donald Trump’s new acting attorney general was part of a company accused by the US government of running a multimillion-dollar scam.

Matthew Whitaker was paid to sit on the advisory board of World Patent Marketing, which was ordered in May this year to pay a $26m settlement following legal action by federal authorities, which said it tricked aspiring inventors.

Whitaker was appointed acting attorney general on Wednesday afternoon after the attorney general, Jeff Sessions, was fired by Trump.

Play Video

Court filings in the case against World Patent Marketing show that Whitaker received regular payments of $1,875 from the Florida-based company, and sent a threatening email to a victim of the alleged scam.

Whitaker publicly vouched for the company, claiming in a December 2014 statement that they “go beyond making statements about doing business ‘ethically’ and translate those words into action”.

What does Jeff Sessions' firing mean for Mueller and the Trump-Russia inquiry?

Read more

Whitaker, a former US attorney for the southern district of Iowa, said at the time: “I would only align myself with a first-class organization.”

Whitaker’s role in the alleged scam was first reported by the Miami New Times in August 2017, shortly before he joined the Trump administration as a senior aide to Sessions.

World Patent Marketing and its founder, Scott Cooper, were sued by the Federal Trade Commission in March last year. The government said it had “operated an invention-promotion scam that has bilked thousands of consumers out of millions of dollars”.

The company was accused of tricking hopeful inventors into paying it thousands of dollars to obtain patents and licensing deals for their inventions. In fact, they “failed to fulfill almost every promise they make to consumers”, the complaint said.

Emails filed to federal court show that in August 2015, Whitaker cited his former role as a federal prosecutor in a threatening email to a customer of World Patent Marketing who had complained about the company to the Better Business Bureau.

“I am assuming you understand that there could be serious civil and criminal consequences for you,” Whitaker wrote in the email. “Understand that we take threats like this quite seriously.”

In May, a judgment requiring World Patent Marketing to pay the government $25,987,192 was entered against the company by a federal court in southern Florida. Whitaker was not named among the defendants in the case.

Cooper later agreed to hand over $1m in assets and the proceeds of the sale of his $3.5m home in return for the rest of the judgment being suspended.

Whitaker, who was appointed acting attorney general by the president shortly after the midterm elections, could not immediately be reached for comment.

Fox News

Published  5 months ago

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and the top Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee are demanding answers as to who is controlling the Justice Department's Russia investigation after Attorney General Jeff Sessions' abrupt resignation on Wednesday.

Conservative Review

Published  5 months ago

Wednesday on the radio, LevinTV host Mark Levin countered the Democrat media narrative that President Donald Trump has created a “constitutional crisis” by firing Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Democrats and the media are saying Sessions’ acting replacement, Matthew Whitaker, is a threat to the Mueller probe based on previous statements by Whitaker criticizing the Russian collusion investigation. Levin said the Democrats were attempting to “smear” Whitaker and blew apart the argument that special counsel Robert Mueller should be independent of oversight by the attorney general.

“This isn’t the Saturday Night Massacre! This isn’t a constitutional crisis! This is perfectly legitimate and perfectly fine,” Levin said. “There’s nothing wrong whatsoever.”

GOP vs the Media

Get the scoop on what’s actually going on and what’s actually important: https://t.co/GB20J0BgAU pic.twitter.com/IWH3z5TQDO

— LevinTV (@LevinTV) November 7, 2018

Don’t miss an episode of LevinTV! Sign up for your FREE 30-day trial today!

Common Dreams

Published  5 months ago

Breaking News... Check back for possible updates and added details...

Progressive organizations have announced coordinated protests to take place in cities and communities nationwide on Thurdsay, November 8th at 5 PM (local time) in the wake of President Donald Trump's firing of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Right after Trump forced Sessions to resign, the White House announced that Matthew Whitaker—a DOJ official who has shown open hostility to the probe by Special Counsel Robert Mueller—would now serve as acting AG and be put in charge of the ongoing investigation.

"Trump just put someone who has openly trashed Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation in charge of it," Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen, one of the advocacy groups behind the rapid-response demonstrations, explained in an emergency email Wednesday evening. "Trump thought that by waiting until after the polls closed on Election Day, our voices would be silent. He was wrong."

Anna Galland, executive director for MoveOn.org, said: "This is a red line crossed, an attack on rule of law."

According to organizers:

This Thursday at 5 p.m. local time, Americans will rally at locations all across the country. Join them.

Find a protest near you.

Other groups— including March for Truth and Indivisible—tweeted out additional information:

"Two years ago we called on people to RESIST, and we saw people from all walks of life resisting policies and decisions that hurt ordinary people," Greenpeace USA executive director Annie Leonard said in a statement. "Now, we must build on that resistance and bring double the energy and double the hope to rebuild a country based on shared values of justice and equality. That's why we're encouraging people to join the Trump Is Not Above the Law network to protest tomorrow at 5 PM across the country."

Rantt

Published  5 months ago

The new acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's past comments indicate an uncertain future for Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Matthew Whitaker was named Acting Attorney General Wednesday after Jeff Sessions turned in his resignation at President Trump’s request. Whitaker also took over the Mueller probe, bumping Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein from the position. Democrat lawmakers panicked after Rosenstein lost control over the Mueller witch hunt and called for Whitaker to recuse himself from […]

dailycaller

Published  5 months ago

President Trump is “very seriously” considering whether to declassify a slew of FBI and Justice Department records related to the Russia investigation, he said Wednesday. That controversial proposal, which Trump has toyed with for months, may have a backer in Matthew Whitaker, the acting attorney general.

“Declassification, we’re looking at very seriously,” Trump told reporters in a press conference on Wednesday, just before Attorney General Jeff Sessions was forced to resign.

Whitaker, who served as Sessions’ chief of staff, will take over as acting attorney general. In that role, he will oversee the special counsel’s investigation into Trump associates’ links to Russia. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein had directed the investigation because Sessions recused himself due to contacts he had with Russians while working on the Trump campaign.

According to Fox News’s Catherine Herridge, Whitaker has worked quietly behind the scenes in support of the push to declassify the Russia documents.

Catherine Herridge reports on acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker @ShepNewsTeam https://t.co/SfA26v0ock pic.twitter.com/H9kTj0p2hs

— Fox News (@FoxNews) November 7, 2018

Trump announced on Sept. 17 that he was ordering the Justice Department and Office of the Director of National Intelligence to begin the process of declassifying 21 pages from an FBI application for a surveillance warrant against former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. (RELATED: Trump Orders Declassification Of Russia Probe Documents)

Trump also called for the declassification of FBI notes from interviews used to obtain the surveillance warrant. He also urged the release of FBI interviews with Bruce Ohr, the Justice Department official who serve as a back channel to Christopher Steele, the author of the Democrat-funded dossier. The FBI relied heavily on the unverified dossier to obtain the spy warrants on Page.

Trump faced heavy backlash from his declassification push. Democrats accused him of meddling with the special counsel’s investigation and of putting confidential FBI sources at risk.

Trump retracted the declassification on Sept. 21, claiming that two foreign allies asked him not to release the documents. Trump allies in Congress suggested that Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray pressured Trump not to release the documents. Some White House attorneys also counseled against releasing the records.

But Trump suggested Wednesday that with the midterms behind him, he is against considering declassification.

“It’s amazing how people on the other side just don’t want those documents declassified,” Trump said in his press conference.

“We’re looking at it carefully. I certainly wanted to wait until after the midterms.”

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

Raw Story

Published  5 months ago

President Donald Trump fired his Attorney General Jeff Sessions and moments later appointed Matthew Whitaker to fulfill the role in the interim.

Since stepping into the limelight, Matthew Whitaker’s qualifications and motives have been questioned.

Reporter Jon Swaine posted that in 2015 Whitaker threatened past clients when he was working as an advisor.

“In this Aug 2015 email, Trump’s new AG Matthew Whitaker threatens a victim of the patents scam firm that was paying Whitaker as an adviser. The firm was sued by the US govt and ordered by a court to pay $26m just 6 months ago,” Swaine tweeted.

In this Aug 2015 email, Trump’s new AG Matthew Whitaker threatens a victim of the patents scam firm that was paying Whitaker as an adviser. The firm was sued by the US govt and ordered by a court to pay $26m just 6 months ago. https://t.co/ooXGt1krVq pic.twitter.com/2y7zt4f7eP

— Jon Swaine (@jonswaine) November 7, 2018

Whitaker also worked for a company known for scamming people.

“And here is future United States Attorney General Matthew Whitaker promoting advances in hot tub design for scammers World Patent Marketing,” he tweeted.

TheHill

Published  5 months ago

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Wednesday called for acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker to recuse himself from "any involvement" in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe, which Whitaker has previously criticized.

"It is impossible to read Attorney General [Jeff] Sessions’ firing as anything other than another blatant attempt by [President Trump] to undermine & end Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation," Pelosi wrote in a tweet.

The appointment of Whitaker and the ouster of Sessions has elicited concerns among Democrats that Trump is taking steps to limit or shut down Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and any possible coordination with his team.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday also called for Whitaker to recuse himself from involvement in Mueller's probe.

The Department of Justice, however, confirmed Wednesday that Whitaker will take over for Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in overseeing the investigation. Whitaker was named acting attorney general on Wednesday when Trump fired Sessions, who had recused himself from the Russia investigation over his role in the Trump campaign.

Whitaker has previously criticized the idea of Mueller's investigation and has suggested that funding for it should be slashed.

In an op-ed for The Hill published last year before Mueller was appointed, Whitaker wrote that calls for an independent counsel to investigate Russian interference "ring hollow."

"Serious, bipartisan congressional investigations into the Russian allegations have been under way for weeks and they have made progress," he wrote. "Hollow calls for independent prosecutors are just craven attempts to score cheap political points and serve the public in no measurable way."

And, in a CNN op-ed also from last year, he said that Mueller was close to crossing a "red line" by investigating Trump's finances. He suggested that Rosenstein "should order Mueller to limit the scope of his investigation."

Whitaker also raised the possibility that a replacement for Sessions could reduce Mueller's funding to the point that the investigation came to "almost a halt."

“I could see a scenario where Jeff Sessions is replaced with a recess appointment and that attorney general doesn’t fire Bob Mueller, but he just reduces his budget so low that his investigation grinds to almost a halt," he said on CNN.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Lock her up!

As Cristina Laila reported earlier…

Jeff Sessions turned in his resignation Wednesday afternoon and the President announced Matthew Whitaker will take over his position as Acting Attorney General.

Whitaker is also taking over Rosenstein’s job overseeing the Mueller witch hunt.

Matthew Whitaker is described as a “Trump loyalist” who has been privately described as the West Wing’s “eyes and ears” in the Justice Department, says the New York Times.

In August of 2017, Matthew Whitaker penned an op-ed for CNN titled, “Mueller’s Investigation of Trump is Going Too Far” wherein he argued the Special Counsel is roving outside of his jurisdiction to investigate Trump-Russia collusion.

And there’s more…

in July 2016, before the presidential election, Matthew Whitaker penned an opinion piece for USA today where he argued that Hillary Clinton should be locked up.

Whitaker wrote:

According to FBI Director James Comey’s statement on Tuesday, former secretary of State Hillary Clinton could have been charged with violating several different code sections, and he detailed the evidence that supports bringing criminal charges.

Yet, Director Comey’s judgment was that “no reasonable prosecutor” would bring the case. I disagree. I believe myself to have been a reasonable prosecutor, and when the facts and evidence show a criminal violation has been committed, the individuals involved should not dictate whether the case is prosecuted…

…A reasonable prosecutor may ask, if on numerous occasions, an unknown State Department employee had taken top secret information from a secured system, emailed that information on a Gmail account, and stored the information on a personal server for years, would that individual be prosecuted? I believe they would.

Hat Tip T. Wictor

True Pundit

Published  5 months ago

In August 2016, Matthew Whitaker, the new interim U.S. Attorney for the United States who has replaced feckless and fired Jeff Sessions, told SiriusXM host Matt Boyle of Breitbart News Daily that he has always believed “this pay-to-play, Clinton Foundation, State Department situation is much more serious” than the original Clinton email scandal.

“James Comey, the director of the FBI, stood up and talked about the emails, and the emailing of classified information. That was serious, but the real ballgame is the situation you’re describing, and that is where Clinton Foundation donors were given preferential treatment,” Whitaker told Boyle. He added:

It’s very interesting to watch the Clinton camp try to explain away these meetings. But, like you said, 50 percent of the meetings she took with people that were not essentially employees or representatives of countries or the like, just sort of individuals that wanted to meet with the Secretary of State, 50 percent of those – as the AP has reported, more than 50 percent – were Clinton Foundation donors.

“It is not possible for them to explain away that Clinton Foundation donors were given preferential treatment when it came to seeing the Secretary of State. It’s just the way business was done,” Whitaker declared, continuing:

The frustrating thing for me continues to be, she had the private email server to avoid public disclosure of her emails. She didn’t turn over any emails until two years after she was supposed to, in 2012, from the illegal server. And yet, we are now almost four years since she finished serving, and we’re still gonna see another 15,000 – what the State Department is calling “documents,” and that’s a very interesting term to me, so I think there’s more to it than just the emails. READ MORE:

Breitbart

Published  5 months ago

Matthew Whitaker, former U.S. Attorney, said he has always believed the Clinton Foundation scandal is more serious than the email scandal.

TheHill

Published  5 months ago

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is no longer overseeing special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation after President Trump abruptly fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions, while also naming his temporary replacement who will now helm the high-profile probe.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) confirmed to The Hill on Wednesday that Matthew Whitaker, who served as Sessions' chief of staff, will now oversee the Russia probe instead of Rosenstein, who has fiercely protected the federal investigation examining Russian interference.

Sessions agreed to resign at Trump’s request, according to a copy of his resignation letter obtained by The Hill. He had recused himself from the Russia probe -- a move played a large role in the souring of their relations.

Sessions, who had been one of the earliest senators to support of Trump during the 2016 presidential election, faced repeated and public attacks from the president during his tenure, including the president denying that he had an attorney general.

Whitaker has already come under scrutiny by top Democrats, who warn that his previous remarks about Mueller's probe suggest he is unfit to oversee the investigation.

"The President is absolutely correct. Mueller has come up to a red line in the Russia 2016 election-meddling investigation that he is dangerously close to crossing," Whitaker wrote, calling for Rosenstein to "limit the scope" of Mueller's investigation.

The move comes one day after the midterm elections, where the House flipped to Democratic control.

Democrats have already indicated that they plan to conduct oversight on a series of matters relating to the Trump administration -- including this one.

"Americans must have answers immediately as to the reasoning behind @realDonaldTrump removing Jeff Sessions from @TheJusticeDept. Why is the President making this change and who has authority over Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation? We will be holding people accountable," said Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), who is the presumed Democrat to become chair of the House Judiciary Committee.

U.S.

Published  5 months ago

FILE PHOTO: Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer speaks with reporters following the weekly policy luncheons on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 2, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said on Wednesday that acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, who was appointed by President Donald Trump after he fired Jeff Sessions, should recuse himself from oversight of the Russia probe.

“Given his previous comments advocating defunding and imposing limitations on the Mueller investigation, Mr. Whitaker should recuse himself from its oversight for the duration of his time as acting attorney general,” Schumer said in a statement.

The Gateway Pundit

Published  5 months ago

Eric Holder is panicking now that Rosenstein no longer has control over the corrupt Mueller probe.

The Deep State and Democrats went from celebrating flipping the House to panicking after the President forced out AG Sessions on Wednesday.

The Gateway Pundit called it–Sessions is OUT!

Shortly after Sessions turned in his resignation letter, a US official said the Acting Attorney General, Matthew Whitaker is expected to take over the Mueller probe.

Matthew Whitaker is described as a “Trump loyalist” who has been privately described as the West Wing’s “eyes and ears” in the Justice Department, says the New York Times.

Up until Wednesday, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s job was to oversee the Mueller probe.

According to reports, Rod Rosenstein will remain as Deputy Attorney General…for now.

Eric Holder lashed out Wednesday following the news that Rosenstein is no longer in control of the Russia witch hunt.

“This is a red line” Holder said.

HOLDER: Anyone who attempts to interfere with or obstruct the Mueller inquiry must be held accountable. This is a red line. We are a nation of laws and norms not subject to the self interested actions of one man.

Anyone who attempts to interfere with or obstruct the Mueller inquiry must be held accountable. This is a red line. We are a nation of laws and norms not subject to the self interested actions of one man.

— Eric Holder (@EricHolder) November 7, 2018

True Pundit

Published  5 months ago

In short, illegal aliens can no longer cross into the United States and request asylum.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen today announced an Interim Final Rule declaring that those aliens who contravene a presidential suspension or limitation on entry into the United States through the southern border with Mexico issued under section 212(f) or 215(a)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) will be rendered ineligible for asylum.

The Acting Attorney General and the Secretary issued the following joint statement:

“Consistent with our immigration laws, the President has the broad authority to suspend or restrict the entry of aliens into the United States if he determines it to be in the national interest to do so. Today’s rule applies this important principle to aliens who violate such a suspension or restriction regarding the southern border imposed by the President by invoking an express authority provided by Congress to restrict eligibility for asylum. Our asylum system is overwhelmed with too many meritless asylum claims from aliens who place a tremendous burden on our resources, preventing us from being able to expeditiously grant asylum to those who truly deserve it. Today, we are using the authority granted to us by Congress to bar aliens who violate a Presidential suspension of entry or other restriction from asylum eligibility.”

Section 212(f) of the Immigration and INA states that “[w]henever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate.”

Further, Section 215(a) of the INA states that it is “unlawful…for any alien to depart from or enter or attempt to depart from or enter the United States except under such reasonable rules, regulations, and orders, and subject to such limitations and exceptions as th